Academic library – Save My NJ Library http://savemynjlibrary.org/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 17:32:16 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://savemynjlibrary.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.png Academic library – Save My NJ Library http://savemynjlibrary.org/ 32 32 Journal Article: “Innovation in Academic Libraries: A Selective Review” https://savemynjlibrary.org/journal-article-innovation-in-academic-libraries-a-selective-review/ Sun, 20 Nov 2022 13:55:35 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/journal-article-innovation-in-academic-libraries-a-selective-review/ The article linked below was recently published by Library Leadership and Management (LL&M). Title Innovation in Academic Libraries: A Selective Review Author Lorraine J. PellackIowa State University Libraries Source Direction and management of the libraryFlight. 36 #3 (2022) Summary It is a deliberately selective compilation of resources and ideas on innovation in academic libraries. The […]]]>

The article linked below was recently published by Library Leadership and Management (LL&M).

Title

Innovation in Academic Libraries: A Selective Review

Author

Lorraine J. Pellack
Iowa State University Libraries

Source

Direction and management of the library
Flight. 36 #3 (2022)

Summary

It is a deliberately selective compilation of resources and ideas on innovation in academic libraries. The aims of this article are: to demystify innovation in academic libraries by providing a basis for those who wish to learn more about it; encourage librarians to explore different types of innovation; present practical ideas for implementing workplace innovation in libraries (as well as supporting innovation on campus); and provide provocative ideas to help spark creativity locally.

direct to Full text article
19 pages; PDF.

Filed under: University libraries, Libraries, Management and direction, New

About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@gmail.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant and frequent speaker based in the Washington DC metro area. He received his MLIS degree from Wayne State University in Detroit. Price has won several awards, including the SLA Innovations in Technology Award and Wayne St. University Library and Information Science Program Alumnus of the Year. From 2006 to 2009, he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com. Gary is also the co-founder of infoDJ an innovation research consultancy that supports enterprise product and business model teams with just-in-time fact finding and insight.

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Unpacking the traditional assessment of the value of academic libraries » https://savemynjlibrary.org/unpacking-the-traditional-assessment-of-the-value-of-academic-libraries/ Sun, 06 Nov 2022 16:08:12 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/unpacking-the-traditional-assessment-of-the-value-of-academic-libraries/ The article linked below was recently published by College & Research Libraries. Title Invisible work, invisible value: analysis of the traditional evaluation of the value of university libraries Authors Rachel Ivy ClarkeSyracuse University Katerina Lynn StantonSyracuse University Alexandra GrimmSyracuse University Bo ZhangSyracuse University Source University and research librariesVol 83, No 6 (2022) DO I:10.5860/crl.83.6.926 Summary […]]]>

The article linked below was recently published by College & Research Libraries.

Title

Invisible work, invisible value: analysis of the traditional evaluation of the value of university libraries

Authors

Rachel Ivy Clarke
Syracuse University

Katerina Lynn Stanton
Syracuse University

Alexandra Grimm
Syracuse University

Bo Zhang
Syracuse University

Source

University and research libraries
Vol 83, No 6 (2022)

DO I:10.5860/crl.83.6.926

Summary

Academic libraries face increasing pressure to demonstrate their value to stakeholders, but traditional assessments of their financial worth ignore the work of librarians and library staff in producing usable collections and services for patrons. Through a survey of American academic library workers, we examine the range, scope, and financial value of work performed in American academic libraries. Our results reveal the ways in which traditional evaluation mechanisms make this work invisible to stakeholders. We argue that making this work more visible will help better communicate the value of academic libraries and spark conversations about reducing workload and stress for library workers.

Source: 10.5860/crl.83.6.926

direct to Full text article

Filed under: University libraries, Libraries, New, Patrons and users, Reports

About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@gmail.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant and frequent speaker based in the Washington DC metro area. He received his MLIS degree from Wayne State University in Detroit. Price has won several awards, including the SLA Innovations in Technology Award and Wayne St. University Library and Information Science Program Alumnus of the Year. From 2006 to 2009, he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com. Gary is also the co-founder of infoDJ an innovation research consultancy that supports enterprise product and business model teams with just-in-time fact finding and insight.

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Are academic library practitioners prepared? » https://savemynjlibrary.org/are-academic-library-practitioners-prepared/ Tue, 04 Oct 2022 11:45:51 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/are-academic-library-practitioners-prepared/ The summary below was published today by The Journal of Academic Librarianship. Title Ethical Issues and Learning Analytics: Are Academic Library Practitioners Prepared? Authors Kyle ML JonesIndiana University-Indianapolis (IUPUI) Lisa Janicke HinchliffeUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Source The Journal of Academic Librarianship DOI: 10.1016/j.acalib.2022.102621 Summary University libraries are involved in the collection and analysis of […]]]>

The summary below was published today by The Journal of Academic Librarianship.

Title

Ethical Issues and Learning Analytics: Are Academic Library Practitioners Prepared?

Authors

Kyle ML Jones
Indiana University-Indianapolis (IUPUI)

Lisa Janicke Hinchliffe
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Source

The Journal of Academic Librarianship

DOI: 10.1016/j.acalib.2022.102621

Summary

University libraries are involved in the collection and analysis of student data. Under the aegis of learning analysis, these practices aim to develop an understanding of how libraries contribute to student learning, the educational experience, and the effective functioning of academic institutions. Learning analytics, however, is fraught with ethical issues, which are made more complex by the high degree of ethics that library practitioners embrace as part of their professional values. This article discusses the results of a survey of academic library practitioners. The survey identifies the ethical issues that practitioners associate with learning analytics and the degree to which they are prepared to address these issues. The discussion suggests ways forward to address knowledge and practice gaps.

direct to Source

Additional Items

By Kyle ML Jones and Lisa Janicke Hinchliffe

Full Text: New Methods, New Needs: Preparing Academic Library Practitioners to Address the Ethical Issues Associated with Learning Analytics (2020)

By Kyle ML Jones, Kristin A. Briney, Abigail Goben, Dorothea Salo, Andrew Asher and Michael R. Perry

Full Text: A comprehensive introduction to library learning privacy practices, initiatives, and issues (2020) (via C&RL)

Filed Under: Academic Libraries, Data Files, Libraries, News

About Gary Price

Gary Price (gprice@gmail.com) is a librarian, writer, consultant and frequent speaker based in the Washington DC metro area. He received his MLIS degree from Wayne State University in Detroit. Price has won several awards, including the SLA Innovations in Technology Award and Wayne St. University Library and Information Science Program Alumnus of the Year. From 2006 to 2009, he was Director of Online Information Services at Ask.com. Gary is also the co-founder of infoDJ an innovation research consultancy that supports enterprise product and business model teams with just-in-time fact finding and insight.

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Basic Webinar: Training Needs for Middle Managers in Academic Libraries https://savemynjlibrary.org/basic-webinar-training-needs-for-middle-managers-in-academic-libraries/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/basic-webinar-training-needs-for-middle-managers-in-academic-libraries/ CHICAGO—Join Core on Wednesday, September 28 at 1 p.m. CT for the webinar “Training Needs of Middle Managers in Academic Libraries”. This webinar, aimed at managers, deans and directors of university libraries, will discuss the training and support of middle managers received when they were new to their position as well as the training they […]]]>

CHICAGOJoin Core on Wednesday, September 28 at 1 p.m. CT for the webinar “Training Needs of Middle Managers in Academic Libraries”. This webinar, aimed at managers, deans and directors of university libraries, will discuss the training and support of middle managers received when they were new to their position as well as the training they would have liked to have received, based on twenty interviews with current middle managers. Two experienced university library administrators will talk about the range of experiences these middle managers have with onboarding, training, and professional development, and share our ideas for improving the experiences of new middle managers. They will also give time for members of the public to share their own experiences. By the end of the webinar, attendees will understand the range of opportunities their fellow middle managers have experienced, be able to contextualize their own level of training within this continuum, and learn what opportunities they could advocate on their behalf or on behalf of managers they supervise.

Training needs of middle managers in university libraries
Live webinar: Wednesday, September 28, 2022, 1 p.m. – 2 p.m. CT

Presenters:
Amy Harris Houk, Assistant Dean for Teaching and Learning, University of North Carolina Greensboro, Greensboro, NC
Ginger H. Williams, Dean of Library Services, Fort Hays State University, Hays, KS

Registration fees:
Main member: $57.67
ALA Member: $71.10
Non-member: $79.00

How can I buy a group registration?

You can register a group by specifying the number of people who will access the webinar during checkout. We offer webinar discounts based on the number of registrations you specify at checkout. If you are a Core member, you can purchase seats for yourself and your colleagues at the Core discount rate; ALA’s new online learning store lets you extend Prime Member savings with colleagues at your institution.

Can’t attend the live event? No problem! All registrants will receive a link to the recorded session for later viewing at their convenience.

Register on line or by phone at 1-800-545-2433 (press 1 to reach our customer service representatives).

For questions or comments regarding Core webinars, please contact Core CE staff at corece@ala.org.

About Basic

Core: Leadership, Infrastructure, Futures is the national association that advances the profession of librarians and information providers in core roles of leadership and management, collections and technical services, and technology. Our mission is to cultivate and amplify the collective expertise of library workers in core functions through community building, advocacy and learning. Core is a division of the American Library Association. Follow us on our Blog, Twitter Where instagram.

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Do you feel watched, monetized and perhaps manipulated? A university library can help | Life https://savemynjlibrary.org/do-you-feel-watched-monetized-and-perhaps-manipulated-a-university-library-can-help-life/ Sat, 03 Sep 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/do-you-feel-watched-monetized-and-perhaps-manipulated-a-university-library-can-help-life/ There is incredible energy around the University of Idaho as we welcome our returning students and celebrate new additions to the Vandal family. The UI library is once again full of students studying, socializing, and using our many resources and services. As a college library, we are focused on connecting our students to high-quality resources, […]]]>

There is incredible energy around the University of Idaho as we welcome our returning students and celebrate new additions to the Vandal family. The UI library is once again full of students studying, socializing, and using our many resources and services.

As a college library, we are focused on connecting our students to high-quality resources, helping them find community, and lowering the cost of a college education through our open educational resource and library reserve programs. . We are also deeply invested in training students to become better researchers and savvier consumers of information.

Giving our students tools and skills to better navigate the information they encounter becomes more important every year. We all work, play, shop, communicate with family and friends, watch the news, and even walk around town with our phone in our pocket. These activities are all monitored, monetized and manipulated by entities that attempt to alter our behavior for their own benefit. The sheer volume of information, misinformation, misinformation, marketing and advertising that we encounter on a daily basis is exhausting, and the resulting fatigue and confusion make us more likely to confuse fiction with fact and lies with truth. As educators, we want to equip our students to fully understand the information environment in which we all live.

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Commentary: The future (budget) of the university library: Physics Today: Vol 75, No 8 https://savemynjlibrary.org/commentary-the-future-budget-of-the-university-library-physics-today-vol-75-no-8/ Mon, 01 Aug 2022 08:02:33 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/commentary-the-future-budget-of-the-university-library-physics-today-vol-75-no-8/ University librarians are stewards of resources invested for the collective good of the campus. Responsible stewardship includes serving the mission of the institution, meeting the needs of scholars and learners, and anticipating future needs. For more than a decade, I have explored the power of future thinking to guide library strategic planning and decision-making.11. LJ […]]]>

University librarians are stewards of resources invested for the collective good of the campus. Responsible stewardship includes serving the mission of the institution, meeting the needs of scholars and learners, and anticipating future needs.

For more than a decade, I have explored the power of future thinking to guide library strategic planning and decision-making.11. LJ Hinchcliffe, Ser. Lib. 7828 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1080/0361526X.2020.1739473 Futures thinking is a framework for considering multiple scenarios of what the future might hold and evaluating those scenarios in terms of likelihood and potential consequences. By considering what futures are possible, librarians can then develop strategies and policies that move toward desirable futures while also hopefully avoiding undesirable ones. Looking ahead also provides an opportunity for other library stakeholders (teachers, students, and administrators) to see their role in ensuring the health of their libraries.

So what about the current state of academic libraries? In short, times are tough.

For decades, academic librarians have faced the realities of collections budgets that have not grown to match the growing volume of journals, books, media, databases, and other resources that faculty and students need for research and learning. Many budgets have not even kept pace with inflation.

The pandemic disruptions only intensified the financial pressures that academic libraries were already facing. An Ithaka S+R survey of US academic library deans and directors found that as of September 2020, 75% of libraries that had a budget for 2020-2021 had experienced a budget cut from what would otherwise have been planned before the pandemic.22. JK Frederick, C. Wolff-Eisenberg, Academic Library Strategy and Budgeting During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Findings from the 2020 Ithaka S+R US Library Survey, Ithaca S+R (December 9, 2020). A notable proportion suffered cuts greater than 10%. Even more difficult, 20% of university libraries did not yet have a budget for the 2020-2021 fiscal year as of September, and many of these libraries had considered substantial cuts.

The survey also documented that the cuts have impacted all aspects of library budgets. Specifically, “62% reduced collections, 59% allocated staff reductions, and 53% reduced operations funds.” Collections budget cuts are further exacerbating the challenges faced by libraries as scholarly output continues to grow while library budgets shrink.

One of my favorite future thinking exercises is the future wheel, which is a visual method of exploring the implications of a given change by thinking about the consequences of the change, then the consequences of those consequences, the consequences of those consequences, etc. The goal is to see the full impact of a particular change from a variety of perspectives and uncover potential unintended consequences, especially those that could be negative, so they can be managed or mitigated.

Whether or not they specifically participated in the Futures Wheel activity, academic librarians are well versed in assessing and managing the implications of contemporary budget cuts and historic declines in purchasing power.

Due to budget cuts to library collections, researchers could spend more time researching access to the articles and books they need – for example, through interlibrary loan – which would take time on other work and increase the time needed to complete a project. Students might have to pay for course materials that are no longer available in the library, which would increase the cost of their college education. And libraries could cancel subscriptions to learned society journals, which would reduce support for fellowships, travel grants and other programs funded by publishing revenue.

Given these potential consequences—and recognizing that a significant reversal in budget trends is as implausible as it would be desirable—academic librarians have sought both short-term and long-term methods to maximize the impact of the budgets available to them. while seeking to alter the financial dynamics of the scholarly communication system as a whole.

Strategies to get the most out of collections budgets have focused on negotiating lower prices, canceling less-used subscriptions, and providing on-demand delivery services, particularly for journal articles. Research libraries have canceled “big ticket” packages with larger publishers and replaced them with a la carte packages that reflect specific campus needs.33.”Tracking reversals of large transactions“, SPARC, https://sparcopen.org/our-work/big-deal-cancellation-tracking;LJ Hinchliffe, “What do libraries keep when they cancel the jackpot?“, Expert cuisine (July 14, 2020). In some cases, they just canceled subscription packages altogether. Unsub, an online subscription analysis tool, has been particularly helpful in these efforts.44. LJ Hinchliffe, “Take a big bite out of the big problem“, Expert cuisine (May 19, 2020). Libraries have been helped during the pandemic by publishers holding prices steady rather than raising fees or even offering price relief. However, many of these programs were temporary and have ceased. In short, libraries are spending smarter and buying less.
Bargaining discounts and similar efforts are unlikely to fully address declining purchasing power or the reality of expanding academic output. Librarians have therefore also attempted to intervene in the market with the aim of changing the business models of scholarly publishing. Transformative agreements, which seek to shift library spending from paying for subscriptions to paying for open access publications, are particularly notable for the increased value received by institutions for their library spending.55. LJ Hinchliffe, “Transformative Chords: An Introduction“, Expert cuisine (April 23, 2019). But they have not yet reduced overall costs for libraries as some have envisioned. The University of California’s multi-payer model, in which its libraries provide financial support to all authors while asking those who receive a grant to cover a portion of the cost of publishing articles, is a unique approach. to solve this problem, but it is still in its early years. of implementation, it is therefore difficult to assess whether it can be extended to other institutions.

Hidden in the discussion of these realignment strategies is a difficult reality: the strategies rely on robust backroom operations and the expansion of other library services. With staffing and operational reductions as a result of the pandemic, libraries may not be able to mitigate the negative consequences of reductions in collections budgets as they once did.

This is why I want to return now to the observation at the beginning of this commentary, namely that thinking about the future provides an opportunity for teachers, students and administrators to think about their roles in relation to the future. of their libraries. To be clear, I’m not saying everyone needs to understand the nuts and bolts of library management. I say, however, that faculty, students, and administrators need to understand the impact of the library on their work — and also what a library collectively makes possible.

University libraries are by nature a lever of equity. They ensure that regardless of background, personal financial resources, social network, or other circumstances, if one is a member of the campus community, one has equal access to information resources. It can be easy for individuals to think they don’t need the library and have personal options. But the question to consider is whether the campus community needs the library.

The current realities of university library budgets reflect the challenges of the past few decades. Good stewardship of declining resources is still a story of declining resources. Librarians must ensure that they create value for their institutions and communicate their impact. But librarians alone cannot ensure that the vision of a library as a public good is a reality on campus. The message that investing in the library is investing in the community is best delivered by the researchers and learners that libraries serve.

  1. 1. LJ Hinchcliffe, Ser. Lib. 7828 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1080/0361526X.2020.1739473, Google ScholarCross reference
  2. 2. JK Frederick, C. Wolff-Eisenberg, Academic Library Strategy and Budgeting During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Findings from the 2020 Ithaka S+R US Library Survey, Ithaca S+R (December 9, 2020). Google ScholarCross reference
  3. 3.Tracking reversals of large transactions“, SPARC, https://sparcopen.org/our-work/big-deal-cancellation-tracking; Google Scholar
    L. J. Hinchliffe, “What do libraries keep when they cancel the jackpot?“, Expert cuisine (July 14, 2020). Google Scholar
  4. 4. L. J. Hinchliffe, “Take a big bite out of the big problem“, Expert cuisine (May 19, 2020). Google Scholar
  5. 5. LJ Hinchliffe, “Transformative Chords: An Introduction“, Expert cuisine (April 23, 2019). Google Scholar
  1. © 2022 American Institute of Physics.
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How to Stand Out When Applying for a College Library Job (Review) https://savemynjlibrary.org/how-to-stand-out-when-applying-for-a-college-library-job-review/ Fri, 15 Jul 2022 07:11:47 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/how-to-stand-out-when-applying-for-a-college-library-job-review/ If you’ve ever applied for a college librarian position and got nowhere, you might have wondered why. I grew up in a college family, had a great mentor in library school, and still didn’t quite understand what a hiring committee was looking for when I applied for my first librarian position. Now that I’ve served […]]]>

If you’ve ever applied for a college librarian position and got nowhere, you might have wondered why. I grew up in a college family, had a great mentor in library school, and still didn’t quite understand what a hiring committee was looking for when I applied for my first librarian position. Now that I’ve served on several hiring committees, I’ll give you a peek behind the curtain.

What can you, the candidate, do to stand out? Do you need to have all the required qualifications as well as all the preferred ones? Just as faculty members may leave their doctoral programs feeling ill-prepared to step into a university classroom, many recent MLI graduates may not have heard of academic job hunting. .

When I recently taught a class at a local graduate program, I created a module centered around this research. I taught my students how to create a matrix using the qualifications stated in the job posting because that’s what hiring committees use to create their screening tools. This article will walk you through this process and provide tips for success, using a job posting for an academic library position at a leading research university as a case study.

Follow the requirements

Whatever the job, you should read the entire job advertisement carefully, including the boilerplate statement about the university, the library and their respective missions. You’d be surprised how many applicants refer to the wrong university, and while this gaffe doesn’t always rule them out, it does show a lack of attention to detail.

Before you even create your matrix, make sure you meet all the required qualifications. The only potential wiggle room might be that our positions generally require you to have your MLS degree in hand prior to the start date, but not necessarily when applying for the position. Otherwise, if you don’t have the required qualifications, it’s a waste of the committee’s time — and that of the committee — to apply.

The job posting I’m going to use as a case study is for a music and performing arts research librarian. One of the required qualifications is “commitment to continuing professional development”, so if I was applying for the position, I would first consider what the library is looking for.

What I understand is that the library wants a candidate who will remain active in professional organizations, such as the Association of Music Libraries, by attending annual meetings and/or serving on committees. You can demonstrate this in your application by listing professional affiliations on your resume and expanding on them in the cover letter. For example, you might say that you have been a member of the Music Library Association for five years, attended national and regional conferences, and served on various committees.

Another required qualification is “knowledge of the tools and methods of digital scholarship”. Familiarity is not the same as “demonstrated experience”, so you don’t need to be an expert here. One way to meet this requirement would be to say that you are familiar with finding aids using coded archival description, or that you know how to help patrons navigate the digital collections found in contentDM, a document management software package. digital assets or other repositories. You must be specific and honest.

Another requirement is the “ability to thrive in a highly collaborative, team-based organization”. Even if your only experience was in graduate school, you can cite group projects and comment on successful strategies you employed there. For example, if you’re the best at keeping your teammates on track and on schedule, you can mention that.

Once you have reviewed all of the required qualifications and determined that you meet them, make sure each one is listed on your resume and/or in your cover letter. Some candidates write their letters in the order the qualifications are written, which is fine for the hiring committee but not necessary. Just make sure the committee doesn’t have to search for that information.

Covering preferred qualifications

You can now review preferred qualifications, which, as the name suggests, will give you an edge over candidates who simply meet the requirements. This position has a preferred qualification of “working knowledge of foreign languages ​​(French or German preferred).” The hiring committee will not test you on a foreign language, so you can indicate the level on your CV (elementary, intermediate, advanced, native speaker), including any certificates or tests, if applicable.

Another favorite qualification is “familiarity with issues of scholarly communication and intellectual property,” and again, note the word “familiarity.” You may describe any classes of graduate study or work experience, such as any work with an institutional repository, open access databases or journals, or a search for cited references.

It’s fine to use non-library experiences to approach qualifications, as long as they’re relevant. If you need to demonstrate that you can work well with clients of all stripes, for example, you can cite retail work as long as you also have library-specific experience to complement.

Whatever you envision in your letter, be as specific as possible. The idea is to put yourself in the place of the hiring committee. The sooner they can check off the boxes in the requirements matrix, the sooner they can get you through to the first round: the phone interview.

Once you have covered the requirements and desired qualifications, see if you can naturally indicate your genuine interest in college and the library. Don’t make up a reason why you’re interested and stay professional. Even if you’re applying for a position at, say, the University of California, Los Angeles, because you want to learn to surf, don’t say that. The cover letter is a great place – and really the only place – where you can talk about your enthusiasm for something like the institution’s student body or faculty research.

For example, my university has a large population of Deaf students, so if an applicant knows ASL, that’s a good thing to mention. We also have many first-generation students, and it’s helpful for the hiring committee to know if a candidate has experience with this student population or if they want to disclose that they were the first in their family to go to the University. You must consider the specifics of the university and the library so that it is clear to the committee that you are not using a generic application.

Reference letters

Back to the job posting: she asks for the contact details of three references. Some libraries will require reference letters, but you should not send them unsolicited. Also, your references should be librarians or professors, not library assistants or paraprofessionals—especially if you’re applying for a tenure-track faculty position—because a library assistant or paraprofessional may not be familiar with some of the nuances. Ideally, your references will have supervised or mentored you, but if necessary, you can ask for a peer. All references must be able to comment knowledgeably, specifically and positively on your work. You also need to make sure that they write their letters in a manner appropriate to the position you are applying for and not generic support letters.

As a courtesy, ask someone before listing them as a reference, and give them the job posting and your resume to help them prepare. It’s fine if references can’t comment on every aspect of a particular job, but you want to put them in place to be successful. Also, let your references know when they might be contacted.

Telephone interviews

After being contacted for a phone interview, pull out your matrix and brainstorm possible interview questions. Even if you clearly met the required qualifications – otherwise you wouldn’t have landed an interview – you will still be asked about at least some of them. Based on the job posting, you might be asked about your commitment to professional development, for example. Preferred qualifications are also fair, so be prepared to speak honestly about one of them. Interviewers may also ask you questions about the job in general (not just about qualifications), so make sure you are familiar with the entire job description.

Bring questions to ask; if you don’t have one, it signals to the committee that you are not interested in the position or the university or library. If you don’t know what to ask, here are some suggestions:

  • What kind of support does the library offer in terms of professional development?
  • For tenure-track positions, does the library have specific tenure and promotion guidelines, and what are the expectations for scholarly publications?
  • What is your favorite aspect of working at the university or the library?

In addition to questions directly related to stated qualifications, a hiring committee often asks questions such as:

  • Scenario: Give an example of a difficult customer interaction. What happened, how did you solve the problem and what was the result?
  • Evaluation: How do you determine if an information literacy session/library workshop/teaching session was a success?
  • Scientific research: What are your research interests? Do you have targeted reviews?
  • Values: what does diversity mean to you?

While there’s no one right way to apply for a college librarian position, you’ll be much more likely to succeed if you’re intentional and take the time to match your background and experience to a specific position. . By putting yourself in the shoes of the hiring committee, you have a much better chance of landing the job.

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Learner-Centered Techniques for Teaching Academic Libraries https://savemynjlibrary.org/learner-centered-techniques-for-teaching-academic-libraries/ Mon, 28 Mar 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/learner-centered-techniques-for-teaching-academic-libraries/ CHICAGO – When you’re alone in front of the class, mastering your content is just the first step. Knowing how to engage students in a way that fosters “ownership” ensures that learning is both active and sustained. In his new guide “Practical University Library Teaching: Learner-Centered Techniques”, published by ALA Editions, Jo Angela Oehrli shares […]]]>

CHICAGO – When you’re alone in front of the class, mastering your content is just the first step. Knowing how to engage students in a way that fosters “ownership” ensures that learning is both active and sustained. In his new guide “Practical University Library Teaching: Learner-Centered Techniques”, published by ALA Editions, Jo Angela Oehrli shares techniques proven and perfected through 20 years of practice in traditional and non-traditional contexts. Drawing on educational research, she applies these techniques to learner-centered teaching of information literacy topics. In this book, organized for quick access to techniques where you need them, you will learn:

  • how to use the guiding principles to shape your personal teaching philosophy;
  • ways to address the unequal power dynamics of a classroom;
  • 5 basic questions to guide your preparation for a course;
  • pointers to communicate with students in the language of the ACRL framework;
  • simple and subtle ways to build relationships with students;
  • real-world applications of educational research concepts such as Keller’s ARCS theory of motivation;
  • metacognitive techniques that promote student ownership of learning;
  • other tips for asking good discussion questions and how to use the brainstorming/pairing/sharing method to encourage discussion;
  • techniques to defuse distraction in the classroom through proximity, pivoting and pausing; and
  • interactive methods to uncover students’ prior knowledge in research.

Oehrli is a learning librarian at the University of Michigan‒Ann Arbor Libraries, where she teaches in individual, small group, and large class settings. A former high school and college teacher, she was an adjunct lecturer at the University of Michigan School of Information and undergraduate courses at the College of Literature, Science and the Arts. In 2017, she won the ALA Library Instruction Round Table Librarian Recognition Award and the University of Michigan Academic Librarian Recognition Award. Oehrli is chairman of the LOEX board of directors from 2021 to 2023.

Many book retailers and distributors are experiencing service disruptions or delays, including Amazon. For faster service, order directly from the ALA store. ALA Store purchases fund advocacy, outreach and accreditation programs for library and information professionals worldwide. ALA Publishing | ALA Neal Schuman publishes resources used by library and information professionals, scholars, students and educators to improve programs and services, build on best practices, improve pedagogy, share research, develop leadership and promote advocacy. ALA authors and developers are leaders in their fields and their content is published in a variety of print and electronic formats. Contact ALA editions | ALA Neal-Schuman at editionsmarketing@ala.org.

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Clarkson University Libraries First University Library to Complete Sustainable Libraries… | News https://savemynjlibrary.org/clarkson-university-libraries-first-university-library-to-complete-sustainable-libraries-news/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 16:45:14 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/clarkson-university-libraries-first-university-library-to-complete-sustainable-libraries-news/ Potsdam, NY, March 11, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Clarkson University Libraries has just become the first university library to complete the rigorous Sustainable Libraries Initiative certification program. The academic certification program encourages collaboration with other campus sustainability efforts and reaches beyond the university to position the university library as a resource and leader in broader […]]]>

Potsdam, NY, March 11, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Clarkson University Libraries has just become the first university library to complete the rigorous Sustainable Libraries Initiative certification program. The academic certification program encourages collaboration with other campus sustainability efforts and reaches beyond the university to position the university library as a resource and leader in broader community resilience.

“Participation on various university committees over the past few years has helped us position Clarkson University Libraries as a critical agency in the campus sustainability mission. We know that environmental sustainability is at the heart of Clarkson’s business. The University has consistently achieved gold ratings from the Higher Education Sustainability Monitoring, Evaluation and Rating System (AASHE STARS). The mission of our libraries says: “Incorporate sustainability issues into all of our practices. From our perspective, this statement sets the tone for all faculty and staff to align their decisions, big and small, with environmental best practices, consideration of social equity and accountability. financial,” said Dean of Libraries Michelle Young. .

With all campus facilities working together to reduce waste and find ways to recycle as much as possible, there is a collaborative and transformational vision for sustainability that fosters new ideas. Newly renovated spaces on campus, including the libraries, feature Energy Star-qualified computers and appliances, LED lighting, and energy-efficient HVAC systems and low-flow plumbing fixtures. Clarkson University uses the Siemens tracking system to compile and monitor energy consumption across the campus. There is a 12-acre, 2-megawatt solar field to generate clean energy for the campus.

Libraries purchase paper products ensuring the highest possible recycled content and ban polystyrene products. Reusable utensils and dishes are used in the library kitchen. In addition to environmental sustainability, Clarkson University Libraries’ commitment to fiscal responsibility, community engagement, and social well-being is essential to meeting the full triple bottom line definition used by the SLCP. Both within the library and across campus, there is a stated commitment to equity, diversity, and inclusion. This has been demonstrated by actions such as the creation and publication of an anti-discrimination reading list, Expanding our Worldview, which includes a reading list and multimedia resources to help students consider new perspectives and challenge to find a broader context to understand the experiences of others.

Recent space renovations at Clarkson University Libraries have focused on their physical space and storage. Creating more study spaces and small groups accessible to the public resulted in a reduction in storage of 1.25 miles of print journals. With more archives available electronically, the library has maintained access to most of these holdings without the need for physical space. Limited space for printed materials is both a challenge and an advantage. The libraries’ willingness to try an innovative open floor plan earned them the respect of faculty, colleagues, and university administration and helped promote the library as a modern institution on campus. The challenge of holding limited print resources has led to marketing and outreach efforts that seek to redefine library services for their campus community. Libraries participate in campus events focused on sustainability. Together with the Institute for Environmental Sustainability, they are planning an Earth Day celebration this year.

The Sustainable Libraries Initiative will continue to pilot its academic library certification program with a full national rollout of the program expected later this year. To learn more about the Sustainable Libraries Initiative, click here: https://sustainablelibrariesinitiative.org/

Attachment

Clarkson Library

Melissa Lindell Clarkson University 315-268-6716 mlindell@clarkson.edu

Copyright 2022 GlobeNewswire, Inc.

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Clarkson University Libraries First University Library in https://savemynjlibrary.org/clarkson-university-libraries-first-university-library-in/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/clarkson-university-libraries-first-university-library-in/ Potsdam, NY, March 11, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Clarkson University Libraries has just become the first university library to complete the rigorous Sustainable Libraries Initiative certification program. The academic certification program encourages collaboration with other campus sustainability efforts and reaches beyond the university to position the university library as a resource and leader in broader […]]]>

Potsdam, NY, March 11, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Clarkson University Libraries has just become the first university library to complete the rigorous Sustainable Libraries Initiative certification program. The academic certification program encourages collaboration with other campus sustainability efforts and reaches beyond the university to position the university library as a resource and leader in broader community resilience.

“Participation on various university committees over the past few years has helped us position Clarkson University Libraries as a critical agency in the campus sustainability mission. We know that environmental sustainability is at the heart of Clarkson’s business. The University has consistently achieved gold ratings from the Higher Education Sustainability Monitoring, Evaluation and Rating System (AASHE STARS). The mission of our libraries says: “Incorporate sustainability issues into all of our practices. From our perspective, this statement sets the tone for all faculty and staff to align their decisions, big and small, with environmental best practices, consideration of social equity and accountability. financial,” said Dean of Libraries Michelle Young. .

With all campus facilities working together to reduce waste and find ways to recycle as much as possible, there is a collaborative and transformational vision for sustainability that fosters new ideas. Newly renovated spaces on campus, including the libraries, feature Energy Star-qualified computers and appliances, LED lighting, and energy-efficient HVAC systems and low-flow plumbing fixtures. Clarkson University uses the Siemens tracking system to compile and monitor energy consumption across the campus. There is a 12-acre, 2-megawatt solar field to generate clean energy for the campus.

Libraries purchase paper products ensuring the highest possible recycled content and ban polystyrene products. Reusable utensils and dishes are used in the library kitchen. In addition to environmental sustainability, Clarkson University Libraries’ commitment to fiscal responsibility, community engagement, and social well-being is essential to meeting the full triple bottom line definition used by the SLCP. Both within the library and across campus, there is a stated commitment to equity, diversity, and inclusion. This has been demonstrated by actions such as the creation and publication of an anti-discrimination reading list, Expanding our Worldview, which includes a reading list and multimedia resources to help students consider new perspectives and challenge to find a broader context to understand the experiences of others.

Recent space renovations at Clarkson University Libraries have focused on their physical space and storage. Creating more study spaces and small groups accessible to the public resulted in a reduction in storage of 1.25 miles of print journals. With more archives available electronically, the library has maintained access to most of these holdings without the need for physical space. Limited space for printed materials is both a challenge and an advantage. The libraries’ willingness to try an innovative open floor plan earned them the respect of faculty, colleagues, and university administration and helped promote the library as a modern institution on campus. The challenge of holding limited print resources has led to marketing and outreach efforts that seek to redefine library services for their campus community. Libraries participate in campus events focused on sustainability. Together with the Institute for a Sustainable Environment, they are planning an Earth Day celebration this year.

The Sustainable Libraries Initiative will continue to pilot its academic library certification program with a full national rollout of the program expected later this year. To learn more about the Sustainable Libraries Initiative, click here: https://sustainablelibrariesinitiative.org/

        
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