Special library – Save My NJ Library http://savemynjlibrary.org/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 09:38:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://savemynjlibrary.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.png Special library – Save My NJ Library http://savemynjlibrary.org/ 32 32 Arlington Heights Memorial Library announces special library card for veterans with printing privileges – Cardinal News https://savemynjlibrary.org/arlington-heights-memorial-library-announces-special-library-card-for-veterans-with-printing-privileges-cardinal-news/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 16:07:43 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/arlington-heights-memorial-library-announces-special-library-card-for-veterans-with-printing-privileges-cardinal-news/ American flagpole of the Arlington Heights Memorial Library on Dunton Avenue. November 11 is Veterans Day, a time to honor veterans and thank them for their service. In that same spirit, every day of the year, the Arlington Heights Memorial Library is pleased to offer a special library card to current and former members of […]]]>
American flagpole of the Arlington Heights Memorial Library on Dunton Avenue.

November 11 is Veterans Day, a time to honor veterans and thank them for their service. In that same spirit, every day of the year, the Arlington Heights Memorial Library is pleased to offer a special library card to current and former members of the United States Armed Forces. In addition to offering the same benefits as standard resident library cards, this card also allows the cardholder to print up to the equivalent of the cost of 100 pages of black and white letters per week at no charge. . The card is distinct in its patriotic design and any active duty military member or veteran residing in Arlington Heights is eligible. Learn more about getting a Veterans and Armed Forces Library Card here.

Additionally, the library is pleased to offer a special lineup of programs and learning opportunities for Veterans Day 2022 beginning Friday, November 11 and continuing throughout the weekend, including:

Operation Market Garden: Friday, November 11, 1:30-2:30 p.m. / Salle Hendrickson / REGISTER

In September 1944, British Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery ordered a bold plan for the largest airdrop of the war. The effort was defeated at the last bridge, “A Bridge Too Far”, at Arnhem, resulting in the complete destruction of the British 1st Airborne Division. Battlefield expert Robert Mueller describes the action and the reasons for its failure.

Top Gun: Maverick | NEW Official Trailer (2022 Film) – Tom Cruise YouTube Tips ⓘ

Friday Film Fun: Top Gun: Maverick: Friday, November 11, 6-8:30 p.m. / Salle Hendrickson / DROP IN

Stop by for a snack and watch Top Gun: Maverick (2022) on our big screens. Duration: 131 minutes. Rating: PG-13

After more than 30 years of service as one of the Navy’s finest airmen, Pete “Maverick” Mitchell pushes the envelope as a brave test pilot and ducks the rank advancement that would ground him. When he finds himself training Top Gun graduates for a specialized assignment, Maverick meets Lt. Bradley Bradshaw, the son of Maverick’s late friend and radar intercept officer “Goose”.

This film screening is suitable for those who could benefit from a supported environment. Some lights will stay on during the movie and coloring activities, weights and fidgets will be available. This program is for ages 18 and over of all levels. No registration required; just fall.

Veterans Day of Service: Saturday, Nov. 12, 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. / Makerplace, 112 N. Belmont Ave. / DROP IN

Veterans and families! Join us in celebrating and honoring veterans and giving back through a day of creation. Head to Makerplace to create items to donate to Operation Gratitude and other local organizations, as well as create a custom project for the veteran in your life (or just you, Veterans)! Take a spin, explore the space and learn more about how you can do all year round. One free project per participant. No registration required; just fall.

Arlingtones Performance & Veterans Day Reception: Sunday, November 13, 2-4 p.m. / Hendrickson Hall / REGISTRATION

Honor Veterans Day with a patriotic performance from the Arlingtones of Arlington Heights. Veterans and their guests are invited to stay after the show for a refreshment reception. Sign up with up to one guest.

The Arlingtones is an award-winning a cappella choir with a rich history dating back to 1952! They are located and sing in the northwest suburbs of Chicago. They perform all types of music in four-part harmony, from Broadway to contemporary and traditional barbershop tunes. The Arlingtones emphasize both music and sociability.

Please Note: The Seniors Center, including the Library Reading Room Branch, is closed on Friday, November 11 and Saturday, November 12 for Veterans Day.

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Sandite sophomores will receive a free book and a special library card https://savemynjlibrary.org/sandite-sophomores-will-receive-a-free-book-and-a-special-library-card/ Sat, 22 Oct 2022 20:15:00 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/sandite-sophomores-will-receive-a-free-book-and-a-special-library-card/ Sarah Dawson Library Charles Page Every year since 2003, the Tulsa County Library has done something amazing. Thanks to the Anne and Henry Zarrow Foundation, the library system was able to provide a free book to every second grader in the county through the Books to Treasure program. And it’s not just any book; it’s […]]]>

Sarah Dawson Library Charles Page

Every year since 2003, the Tulsa County Library has done something amazing.

Thanks to the Anne and Henry Zarrow Foundation, the library system was able to provide a free book to every second grader in the county through the Books to Treasure program. And it’s not just any book; it’s the one chosen specifically to honor a famous illustrator!

Copies of the chosen book are sent to most public schools, and our librarians and children’s associates personally deliver the rest.

Schedules ready, we even do school tours to talk about the book and its illustrator, encourage parents to sign up their kids for a special edition library card, and explain how kids can meet the illustrator in real life at of the annual Books To Treasure event.

This year’s Books to Treasure illustrator is Katherine Roy, and the book each second-grader will receive is “How to Be an Elephant.” You might recognize it from Sequoyah’s Master List for Kids 2019, an annual selection of books curated by school and public libraries that students read and then vote on.

People also read…

As I mentioned, students can also sign up for a special edition library card. If they already have a library card, it can be replaced by a card that only second year students in 2022 can have! This year’s card is particularly cute, featuring Roy’s illustration of a baby elephant.

If your second year student forgot to bring their application home from school, please stop by the Charles Page Library, and we’ll make sure they get the special card.

The book and special library card are also available for homeschoolers. Parents or guardians of homeschooled sophomores can stop by the library to pick up the special library card and book.

We also have some lesson plans based on the illustrator’s books on our website, available at tulsalibrary.org/bookstotreasure.

If your child is not yet in CE2, don’t worry, next October we will have a new book and a library card to give away.

Finally, we also bring the illustrator to Tulsa. Katherine Roy will host a free public presentation and book signing at 6 p.m. on Friday, November 18 at Connor’s Cove at the Hardesty Regional Library, 8316 E. 93rd St. in Tulsa. Children are encouraged to bring their new book with them to have it signed by Roy.

Whether you’re visiting us at the library for your second year’s new book and library card or planning to attend the presentation to meet the illustrator, we hope to see you soon!

Sarah Dawson is the director of Charles Page Library in Sand Springs.

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A coastal engineer will discuss Wexford’s erosion work in a special library presentation https://savemynjlibrary.org/a-coastal-engineer-will-discuss-wexfords-erosion-work-in-a-special-library-presentation/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 19:13:00 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/a-coastal-engineer-will-discuss-wexfords-erosion-work-in-a-special-library-presentation/ Few counties have suffered as much coastal erosion as Wexford over the past decade. With over 260km of coastline, over 70 beaches and 11 piers and harbours, the county has been buffeted by storms on several occasions in recent years causing significant chunks of coastline to disappear into the sea. George Colfer is an engineer […]]]>

Few counties have suffered as much coastal erosion as Wexford over the past decade. With over 260km of coastline, over 70 beaches and 11 piers and harbours, the county has been buffeted by storms on several occasions in recent years causing significant chunks of coastline to disappear into the sea. George Colfer is an engineer Coastal Council of Wexford County and he will discuss the work he is undertaking to tackle climate change during a special presentation at Wexford Library on Thursday 15 September at 11am.

At the beginning of the presentation, George will give an overview of the main aspects of the coastline, highlighting some of the most important and challenging issues. Around 80% of Wexford’s coastline is soft and much of it is subject to erosion. George will describe the areas at risk of erosion around the coast and identify some of the challenges caused by erosion and the impacts of climate change. It will summarize the major studies and surveys commissioned by state agencies over the years to identify problems along the Wexford coast and to secure the funding to carry out the necessary protective works.

Rosslare Strand is a very dynamic coastal system with the beach and dune system either side of Wexford Harbor subject to continuous change, erosion and sedimentation. Wexford County Council has been concerned about erosion here for many years and as a result significant coastal protection works have been built since the 1950s. As a case study George will present details of the Rosslare’s €8 million Coastal Erosion and Flood Relief Programme, looking at the historic coastal protection works carried out to date. It will describe the context of the current program and show the plans in place to implement this important coastal protection program. This is a very important program to reduce risk to homes, businesses and the community itself, which is particularly relevant as mean sea levels are expected to rise and the frequency and severity of coastal storms are expected to rise. increase.

With over 70 beaches including six Blue Flag beaches and nine Green Coast beaches, George will describe the work involved in ensuring bathing water quality and maintaining the international Blue Flag standard. In beach management, George will show liaison and coordination with a wide range of agencies and organizations including the Environmental Protection Agency, Health Service Executive and An Taisce.

Wexford County Council operates 11 piers and ports, including Kilmore Quay, the largest local authority operated port in the country. George will provide an overview of major civil works and how to obtain central government funding before concluding with a summary of the uses and benefits of the coast.

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The Rotary Club of Grand Forks arrives with special library books – Grand Forks Gazette https://savemynjlibrary.org/the-rotary-club-of-grand-forks-arrives-with-special-library-books-grand-forks-gazette/ Fri, 25 Feb 2022 23:30:00 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/the-rotary-club-of-grand-forks-arrives-with-special-library-books-grand-forks-gazette/ A host of exciting new books are available for young readers at the Grand Forks Library thanks to a donation from the city’s Rotarians. The books come from a series of interactive stories that read themselves, according to library director Cari Lynn Gawletz. The Grand Forks & District Public Library added eight of these ‘Vox […]]]>

A host of exciting new books are available for young readers at the Grand Forks Library thanks to a donation from the city’s Rotarians.

The books come from a series of interactive stories that read themselves, according to library director Cari Lynn Gawletz. The Grand Forks & District Public Library added eight of these ‘Vox books’, named after the Latin for ‘voice’, with a $500 grant from Rotary District 5080, which covers eastern British Columbia and parts of Oregon and Washington states.

“They’re very popular with kids,” Gawletz told The Gazette on Friday, Feb. 25.

Four-year-old Juniper Slade reads “Toasty” while hanging out in a hammock. Photo courtesy of Erin Slade

These must-reads are highly sought after not only for the gripping stories, but also for their interactive features. Kids can curl up with the books and either read the printed pages or listen as the built-in speakers tell the stories.

Cheryl Ahrens, president of the Grand Forks Rotary Club, said she applied for the grant because she knows Gawlets loves Vox books. And at around $80 apiece, the books certainly aren’t cheap.

“Cari had come to speak at the Rotary Club and I thought to myself that the library would always need books,” she said.

Of the eight new titles, Gawletz said his favorite was Gatewhich tells the story of a piece of toast that would like to be a dog. What the dinosaurs did last night was a close second, leaving Gawletz laughing at the book’s allusions to the 90s animated classic toy story.

Four-year-old Juniper Slade, whose mother Erin works in the library, also enjoyed Gatethough one would imagine she relied more on the interactive features than the literate Gawletz.

For more information on how to borrow Vox books and many, many print books, visit the library at 7342 Fifth St. or visit the library’s webpage at grandforks.bc.libraries.coop.


@ltritsch1
laurie.tritschler@grandforksgazette.ca
Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

laurie.tritschler@boundarycreektimes.com
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BooksGrand ForksRotary

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The Rotary Club of Grand Forks arrives with special library books https://savemynjlibrary.org/the-rotary-club-of-grand-forks-arrives-with-special-library-books/ Fri, 25 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/the-rotary-club-of-grand-forks-arrives-with-special-library-books/ A host of exciting new books are available for young readers at the Grand Forks Library thanks to a donation from the city’s Rotarians. The books come from a series of interactive stories that read themselves, according to library director Cari Lynn Gawletz. The Grand Forks & District Public Library added eight of these “Vox […]]]>

A host of exciting new books are available for young readers at the Grand Forks Library thanks to a donation from the city’s Rotarians.

The books come from a series of interactive stories that read themselves, according to library director Cari Lynn Gawletz. The Grand Forks & District Public Library added eight of these “Vox books,” named after the Latin for “voice,” with a $500 grant from Rotary District 5080, which covers eastern British Columbia. and parts of Oregon and Washington states.

“They’re very popular with kids,” Gawletz told The Gazette on Friday, Feb. 25.

Four-year-old Juniper Slade reads “Toasty” while hanging out in a hammock. Photo courtesy of Erin Slade

These must-reads are highly sought after not only for the gripping stories, but also for their interactive features. Kids can curl up with the books and either read the printed pages or listen as the built-in speakers tell the stories.

Cheryl Ahrens, president of the Grand Forks Rotary Club, said she applied for the grant because she knows Gawlets loves Vox books. And at around $80 each, the books certainly don’t come cheap.

“Cari had come to speak at the Rotary Club and I thought the library would always need books,” she said.

Of the eight new titles, Gawletz said his favorite was Gatewhich tells the story of a piece of toast that would like to be a dog. What the dinosaurs did last night was a close second, leaving Gawletz laughing at the book’s allusions to the animated ’90s classic toy story.

Four-year-old Juniper Slade, whose mother Erin works in the library, also enjoyed Gatethough one would imagine she relied more on the interactive features than the literate Gawletz.

For more information on how to borrow Vox books and many, many print books, visit the library at 7342 Fifth St. or visit the library’s webpage at grandforks.bc.libraries.coop.


@ltritsch1
laurie.tritschler@grandforksgazette.ca
Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

laurie.tritschler@boundarycreektimes.com
Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

BooksGrand ForksRotary

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Pulaski County Schools Migrant Program Launches Special Library https://savemynjlibrary.org/pulaski-county-schools-migrant-program-launches-special-library/ Tue, 21 Dec 2021 23:26:00 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/pulaski-county-schools-migrant-program-launches-special-library/ [ad_1] December 21 – Students in Pulaski County weathered the worst of COVID-19 lockdowns by adapting to distance learning. For migrant students in families who often follow the harvest for work, adapting – to new schools and communities – is a way of life. With the pandemic underway, these local community students are relying more […]]]>


[ad_1]

December 21 – Students in Pulaski County weathered the worst of COVID-19 lockdowns by adapting to distance learning.

For migrant students in families who often follow the harvest for work, adapting – to new schools and communities – is a way of life. With the pandemic underway, these local community students are relying more than ever on the Pulaski County Schools’ Migrant Education Program to help them keep up with classroom work – and more.

The Migrant Education Program complements the educational needs of students with services such as tutoring, the provision of necessary school supplies (backpacks, binders, pencils, paper, etc.) and helps them track their growth as they grow. and as they progress through the district. The program is open to children (aged 3 to 21) of migrant workers crossing the district borders over a period of 36 months, or anyone under the age of 22 who works in the fields can be considered an out-of-school youth. (OSY).

“Migrant education has been around since the 1960s all over the United States,” said program coordinator Kayla Shumaker, adding that “migrant” is not necessarily synonymous with immigrant. “Migrant just means you move frequently … Our students move quite frequently due to farm work. “

The office – located on the Pulaski County School Board campus near North Main Street – has a donation / clothing closet to help families with other basic needs and this year program staff have expanded a library within its department.

“Our parents can come in and look at the clothes closet while their kids go to the library,” said Shumaker, adding that the room is equipped with toys and a dry-erase board for small children to play with. “They can also check out a book to take home.”

Shumaker noted that the books come in volumes in English and Spanish. There are also several copies of popular titles, in case more than one child at a time wants to view a particular book. The shelves are crammed with a wide variety of subjects, from fiction to textbooks, for all reading levels, from kindergarten to high school.

“We have bilingual resources for parents; we have resources for ACT, PSAT, scholarships; we have books on certification in a technology field if you don’t want to go to college,” Shumaker continued.

There are graphic novels for those who don’t like to read at all.

“They don’t see it as much like reading as watching a comic,” Shumaker said, “but they’re working on those skills.”

The library has been especially great for students who don’t yet speak English well, according to Shumaker, as trying to consult a book at school or even at the public library can be a challenge if no one is speaking. Spanish to help them.

“If they find us – or if we do find them – we have a library where students can come and consult books,” she said. “I am an avid reader, and if you can learn to read, you can learn to do anything.”

Guardians Katlyn Shepherd and Nichole Sharpe are also new to the Migrant Education Program this year.

“We have about 100 students in independent schools in Pulaski and Somerset,” Shumaker said. “They divide the schools and between them can see all of our students every week. It’s a big business.”

The Pulaski County Migrant Education Office is open weekdays from 8:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. when school is in session, although the program also offers a summer camp between each school year. If parents need help and the office is closed, they can reach Shumaker until 10 p.m. through the TalkingPoints language equity app.

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Pulaski County Schools Migrant Program Launches Special Library | Local news https://savemynjlibrary.org/pulaski-county-schools-migrant-program-launches-special-library-local-news/ Tue, 21 Dec 2021 05:11:23 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/pulaski-county-schools-migrant-program-launches-special-library-local-news/ [ad_1] Students in Pulaski County weathered the worst of COVID-19 lockdowns by adapting to distance learning. For migrant students in families who often follow the harvest for work, adapting – to new schools and communities – is a way of life. With the pandemic underway, these local community students are relying more than ever on […]]]>


[ad_1]

Students in Pulaski County weathered the worst of COVID-19 lockdowns by adapting to distance learning.

For migrant students in families who often follow the harvest for work, adapting – to new schools and communities – is a way of life. With the pandemic underway, these local community students are relying more than ever on the Pulaski County Schools’ Migrant Education Program to help them keep up with classroom work – and more.

The Migrant Education Program complements the educational needs of students with services such as tutoring, the provision of necessary school supplies (backpacks, binders, pencils, paper, etc.) and helps them track their growth as they grow. and as they progress through the district. The program is open to children (between 3 and 21 years old) of migrant workers crossing the district borders over a period of 36 months, or anyone under the age of 22 who works in the fields can be considered an out-of-school youth. (OSY).

“Migrant education has been around since the 1960s all over the United States,” said program coordinator Kayla Shumaker, adding that “migrant” is not necessarily synonymous with immigrant. “Migrant just means you move frequently… Our students move quite frequently due to farm work. “

The office, located on the Pulaski County School Board campus near North Main Street, has a donation / clothing closet to help families with other basic needs and this year program staff have expanded a library within its department.

“Our parents can come in and look at the clothes closet while their kids go to the library,” said Shumaker, adding that the room is equipped with toys and a dry-erase board for small children to play with. “They can also check out a book to take home.”

Shumaker noted that the books come in volumes in English and Spanish. There are also several copies of popular titles, in case more than one child wants to consult a particular book. The shelves are crammed with a wide variety of subjects, from fiction to textbooks, for all reading levels, from kindergarten to high school.

“We have bilingual resources for parents; we have resources for ACT, PSAT, scholarships; we have books on certification in a technology field if you don’t want to go to college,” Shumaker continued.

There are graphic novels for those who don’t like to read at all.

“They don’t see it as much like reading as watching a comic,” Shumaker said, “but they’re working on those skills.”

The library has been especially great for students who don’t yet speak English well, according to Shumaker, as trying to consult a book at school or even at the public library can be a challenge if no one is speaking. Spanish to help them.

“If they find us – or if we do find them – we have a library where students can come and consult books,” she said. “I am an avid reader, and if you can learn to read, you can learn to do anything.”

Guardians Katlyn Shepherd and Nichole Sharpe are also new to the Migrant Education Program this year.

“We have about 100 students in independent schools in Pulaski and Somerset,” Shumaker said. “They divided the schools and between them they can see all of our students every week. It’s a big business.”

The Pulaski County Migrant Education Office is open weekdays from 8:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. when school is in session, although the program also offers a summer camp between each school year. If parents need help and the office is closed, they can reach Shumaker until 10 p.m. through the TalkingPoints language equity app.

[ad_2]

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Delhi village sets up special library for women preparing for competitions https://savemynjlibrary.org/delhi-village-sets-up-special-library-for-women-preparing-for-competitions/ Sun, 05 Sep 2021 15:09:00 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/delhi-village-sets-up-special-library-for-women-preparing-for-competitions/ [ad_1] In a one-of-a-kind project, the Delhi government has built a special library for women in the village of Karala in northwest Delhi. The women-only community library was created as part of a women’s empowerment project under the “Beti Bachao, Beti Padhao” program launched by the central government. The dedicated library will encourage aspiring women […]]]>


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In a one-of-a-kind project, the Delhi government has built a special library for women in the village of Karala in northwest Delhi. The women-only community library was created as part of a women’s empowerment project under the “Beti Bachao, Beti Padhao” program launched by the central government. The dedicated library will encourage aspiring women and help those who have started to prepare for competitions such as engineering, UPSC, medicine and many more.

The mission was undertaken by the SDM of Kanjhawala Saumya Sharma to prioritize young girls who wanted to be successful in their lives. Citing the example of a girl from Majri village, SDM Sharma told Indian Express that such talent needs a “platform where they can be better guided and trained.” She also hopes that having access to a library and information would help girls with the potential to move out of their homes for a better future.

The books in the library were suggested by Vision IAS, a Delhi center that trains aspirants for Indian administrative services. In order to stimulate female candidates, the North West Delhi district administration has also decided to set up guidance and counseling centers near villages, district magistrate Chestha Yadav told IndianExpress.

According to reports, the request to establish the library was proposed by the villagers of Karala, especially the men, said SDM Sharma. The interior of the library was built by the Vrikshit Foundation. The organization did a spectacular job adding decorative pieces that promoted learning and personal development. He also added murals and paintings that represented the power of knowledge.

More such initiatives in the future

The exclusive library is one of a kind at the initiative of the district administration. It will provide space and security for ambitious women eager to work hard. Authorities have sought to build more such community libraries in villages based on feedback from villagers, SDM told reporters. The library was inaugurated on the eve of the Teachers’ Day in the presence of District Magistrate Chestha Yadav, SDM Saumya Sharma and IAS Vishakha Yadav

Image: @ DMNorthWestDelhi / Twitter

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Danville Public Library offers special library card incentives https://savemynjlibrary.org/danville-public-library-offers-special-library-card-incentives/ Mon, 30 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/danville-public-library-offers-special-library-card-incentives/ [ad_1] DANVILLE, Ill. (WCIA) – Danville Public Library (DPL) is running a special Star Wars pay-per-view incentive program in September. Officials said the free library card gives people access to a large number of books, e-books, audiobooks, videos, DVDs, CDs and more. Cards are available to new cardholders and existing cardholders with accounts in good […]]]>


[ad_1]

DANVILLE, Ill. (WCIA) – Danville Public Library (DPL) is running a special Star Wars pay-per-view incentive program in September.

Officials said the free library card gives people access to a large number of books, e-books, audiobooks, videos, DVDs, CDs and more. Cards are available to new cardholders and existing cardholders with accounts in good standing. Those who receive this new card will be entered into a raffle to win Baby Yoda-themed prizes, including gift cards, a book signed by Star Wars author Timothy Zahn, and an animatronic Baby Yoda.

“We have 5,000 limited edition Baby Yoda / Grogu library cards available, and my personal goal is to have them all out by the end of September,” said Jennifer Hess, director of the DPL library.

According to officials, there are several options for a la carte registration:
– In person at the Danville Public Library
– Online at www.danvillepubliclibrary.org
– Withdrawal of an application at local businesses or at local events

Anyone interested must complete an application and provide proof of residence or ownership in Danville.

For more information, visit the Danville Public Library website or call 217-477-5220.

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Special Library Commission meeting focuses on needs of Southeast Warren – Macomb Daily https://savemynjlibrary.org/special-library-commission-meeting-focuses-on-needs-of-southeast-warren-macomb-daily/ Mon, 09 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/special-library-commission-meeting-focuses-on-needs-of-southeast-warren-macomb-daily/ [ad_1] The Warren Library Commission recently held a special meeting to discuss options for bringing library services to the city’s most southeastern corner. The neighborhood, which lies in the area of ​​Schoenherr and Toepfer roads, has been without a library for over 20 years, since the closure of the Edgar A. Guest Library on Stephens. […]]]>


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The Warren Library Commission recently held a special meeting to discuss options for bringing library services to the city’s most southeastern corner.

The neighborhood, which lies in the area of ​​Schoenherr and Toepfer roads, has been without a library for over 20 years, since the closure of the Edgar A. Guest Library on Stephens. Currently there is no library east of Van Dyke Avenue in the town of Warren. For several years, residents have been asking for the return of library services, including activities such as “story time” and crafts.

More recently, resident Vera Speagle pioneered the idea of ​​a book kiosk that could be located in Winters Park on St. Andrews Avenue and give residents 24 hour access to books and other items. library like DVDs. Currently, Library Director Oksana Urban is awaiting a response to a grant application that would fund a mobile library to serve the Speagle neighborhood as well as other areas of the city. Discussions between Van Dyke Schools Superintendent Piper Bognar and Mayor James Fouts regarding a possible library annex at McKinley Elementary School, which is adjacent to Winters Park, are ongoing.

Speagle joined Tuesday’s Zoom meeting and said she was open to any ideas and willing to work with anyone to bring a library to her neighborhood, but time is running out.

“I love all of the ideas that have been presented, but we really need a library now,” said Speagle. “We have been neglected for so long that we can’t wait for a library to be built or even an annex to be built. The Contextual Library is something we can do right now for those residents who have been excluded from the activities of the city for so long. We need something ASAP and something that draws people to the park and creates a community atmosphere.

Library Commission Chairman Frank Pasternak said he was open to new ideas and would like to hear more feedback from residents regarding their specific needs and asked them to write letters to the Library Commission and also discussed the possibility of holding a meeting at Winters Park. give residents the opportunity to voice their concerns.

“There have been discussions about using the parks for kiosks or for temporary structures like take-out reading centers, leave,” Pasternak said. “It’s kind of a temporary fix and it’s also a small part of the library and its resources would be very limited. I think the approach of using a bookmobile is more acceptable and I think it is the best opportunity to provide reading material and access to resources to people who need them.

Annette Majka, a member of the Libraries Commission, said that whatever other library services may be added in South East Warren, a mobile library is needed and is a priority for the whole city. Ultimately, she would like to see something more permanent in the Winters Park neighborhood, perhaps a kiosk to begin with, with the goal of working at a brick and mortar library.

“I think we need a bookmobile no matter what, but it cannot replace a fixed library,” said Majka. “Citizens need something that’s there all the time. I like the idea of ​​a popup, but I am concerned about vandalism. If we could find a solution with the idea of ​​the annex at McKinley, I think that would be the ideal situation. It would be permanent, there would be library staff there; for me it would be the ultimate. Can we afford all of this? It’s all about numbers. “

Pasternak said at the August 3 special meeting that the commission will gather feedback from residents and then develop an approach that takes into account the library’s budget, including grant opportunities, as well as the neighborhood’s most urgent needs.

“We have to get the ideas of the residents and then start to move forward and find the best way to approach this,” Pasternak said. “We are for anything that makes sense and will work as hard as possible to provide library services to residents. A book box is a step forward in providing resources, but it is limited. A bookmobile would be more in line with what I thought as it would have greater functionality and the idea of ​​having an annex in a school looks even more appealing if we could make it work.

Urban said she would contact the director of the Novi Library for information on that city’s Lakeshore Lending Library, which is featured as Michigan’s first self-service library kiosk on the novilibary.org website. This library kiosk was sponsored in part by the Community Financial Credit Union.

“I’m not really in favor of a popup, but if it’s the best we can do, we should do it,” said Majka. “It could be ideal until we can get something more permanent and I’m in favor of a bookmobile no matter what. “

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