county public – Save My NJ Library http://savemynjlibrary.org/ Sat, 19 Mar 2022 14:39:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://savemynjlibrary.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.png county public – Save My NJ Library http://savemynjlibrary.org/ 32 32 Ellwood City Public Library activities for the week of March 21 – Ellwood City, PA news https://savemynjlibrary.org/ellwood-city-public-library-activities-for-the-week-of-march-21-ellwood-city-pa-news/ Sat, 19 Mar 2022 13:22:19 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/ellwood-city-public-library-activities-for-the-week-of-march-21-ellwood-city-pa-news/ Posted By: EllwoodCity.org Staff March 19, 2022 The Town of Ellwood Public Library offers a variety of weekly activities. Information is available by calling the library at 724-758-6458. PLEASE NOTE: The library has partnered with Seneca Library District, Oil Creek Library District, Erie County Public Library, and Crawford County Federated Library System for eBooks. You […]]]>

The Town of Ellwood Public Library offers a variety of weekly activities. Information is available by calling the library at 724-758-6458.

PLEASE NOTE:

The library has partnered with Seneca Library District, Oil Creek Library District, Erie County Public Library, and Crawford County Federated Library System for eBooks. You can now use the Overdrive or Libby app. to borrow books from the above libraries. Please call the library with any questions.

WERE OPEN!

The Library is open. Newspapers, magazines and toys will not be available at this time. Masks must be worn, covering mouth and nose, in the building throughout the visit. We will continue to do curbside pickup. Please call us with the recommended book(s), authors, genre or material you wish to view and our staff will see that it is alphabetically in the lobby for you. We always make our returns in specially marked containers in our hall. Please do not put donated books in these bins. 724-758-6458 is the number to call for inquiries.

Hours are Tuesday 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Wednesday 10:00 a.m. to 6:30 p.m., Thursday 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Friday 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. and Saturday 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Please remember that no one is available to take your calls unless it is during the hours indicated above.

Activities taking place this week include.

TUESDAY MARCH 22

  • 10:00 a.m. – “Baby Laptime,” a program for babies, toddlers, and preschoolers conducted via Facebook.
  • 6:00 p.m. – “Just Me and You Book Group”, will discuss the book “President of the Whole 5th Grade” by Sherri Winston on Zoom.

WEDNESDAY MARCH 23

  • Tony Crow will be at the library from 10:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. to help veterans. No appointment necessary.

THURSDAY MARCH 24

  • 6:00 p.m. – “Family Laptime”, a program for babies, toddlers and preschoolers conducted via Facebook

Sign up for the monthly e-newsletter to keep up to date with all the programs and activities happening at the library.

Here are the commemorative contributions received by the library during the month of March. Theses are published on a weekly basis in this section and represent part of the contributions received.

MEMOIRS:

  • In Memory of Carl F. Agostinelli by Ron and Debbie Atkinson
  • In Memory of Marian C. Fray by Liz Patterson and Nadene Hipple
  • In memory of Joseph Francis Valerian Jaeger by Ron and Debbie Atkinson
  • In memory of Mary “Dolly” Frances Lucas of Samuel Teolis Funeral Home, Inc.
  • In memory of Lester J. Miller by Doris and Laurie Keane
  • In memory of Loretta G. Paganie by Doris and Laurie Keane
  • In memory of Annie Trivilino of Samuel Teolis Funeral Home, Inc.
  • In memory of Joseph A. Valentino, Sr. of Liz Pratt, Samuel Teolis Funeral Home, Inc.
  • In Memory of Andrew Woloszyn by Ron and Debbie Atkinson
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Library plans planting session, Growing Reade – Times News Online https://savemynjlibrary.org/library-plans-planting-session-growing-reade-times-news-online/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 15:59:23 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/library-plans-planting-session-growing-reade-times-news-online/ Published on March 16, 2022 at 11:38 am Earth Day is April 22. With spring fast approaching, the buds have come out on the plants and the things that are growing are at the forefront of our thoughts. On April 18 and 19, we are organizing a planting session at the library. Free for all, […]]]>

Published on March 16, 2022 at 11:38 am

Earth Day is April 22. With spring fast approaching, the buds have come out on the plants and the things that are growing are at the forefront of our thoughts.

On April 18 and 19, we are organizing a planting session at the library. Free for all, this event is from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. each day. Bring a flower pot if you wish.

We are also thinking about how to “grow” our budding readers. What better way for a library to increase readership than to introduce a program just for them?

We will launch this program – Growing Readers – after Easter, April 17th. The Wayne County Public Library generously shared its Growing Readers program with the Catasauqua Public Library.

If you have young children, you may have heard of the 1000 Pound Program before kindergarten. The program asks caregivers and children to read 1,000 books together.

We decided to aim for 500 books to read with a carer. For every 10 books read, children will receive a special sticker. After reading 250 books, children will receive a book to keep, and when they have read 500 books, they will receive a certificate and a special prize.

Reading to a child is the most important thing adults can do to prepare children to read. Children introduced to reading early tend to start reading earlier and excel in school and throughout their lives. Moreover, it creates many happy memories between children and adults who read them.

It may seem like a lot to hit 500 pounds, but one bedtime pound a day will help a child reach that goal very quickly. Families can participate in this program any time before kindergarten.

You might want to start right away! Come and pick up your reading book at the library whenever you want. We ask caregivers to keep an accurate count of books read with our growing readers, using the reading log.

NEW BOOKS

Fiction: “Becoming my sister”, VC Andrews; “Dream City”, David Baldacci; “The Christie Affair”, Nina de Gramont; “A Relative Murder”, Jude Deveraux; “The Golden Couple,” Greer Hendricks and Sarah Pekkanen; “The Missing Piece”, John Lescroart; “Summer Getaway”, Susan Mallery; “The Darkest Place”, Phillip Margolin; “Fear Thy Neighbour,” Fern Michaels; “Death of the Black Widow,” James Patterson and JD Barker; “22 Seconds,” James Patterson and Maxine Paetro; “The Investigator”, John Sandford; “High Stakes,” Danielle Steel; “Nine Lives,” Peter Swanson; “French Braid”, Anne Tyler

Works of Fiction: “One Thing After Another: Memoirs of an Attorney General”, William Barr; “Shadow-Man: An Elusive Psychopathic Killer and the Birth of FBI Profiling”, Ron Franscell; “Watergate: A New History,” Garrett M. Graff; “The Whole Body Reset: Your Weight Loss Plan for a Flat Belly, Optimal Health, and a Body You’ll Love in 40s and Beyond,” Stephen Perrine with Heidi Skolnik; “The Founders: The Story of PayPal and the Entrepreneurs Who Shaped Silicon Valley,” Jimmy Soni; “Take Control of Your Diabetes Risk,” John Whyte, MD, M.Ph.

Juvenile: “The Three Bears: Lily to the Rescue”, W. Bruce Cameron; “The Haven Trials (Minecraft)”, Suyi Davies; “On Purpose (Cat Kid Comic Club #3)”, Dav Pilkey; “Flames of Hope (Wings of Fire, Book 15)”, Tui Sutherland

Young adult: “Galant”, VE Schwab; “I must betray you”, Ruta Sepetys

Picture books for children: “What am I going to do with my love today?” Kristin Chenoweth; “Why not you?” Ciara and Russell Wilson; “Pretty Perfect Kitty-Corn”, Shannon Hale and Leuyen Pham; “The Library Fish,” Alyssa Satin Capucilli; “Minions: Five Minute Stories”, Illumination Entertainment; “The Seasons of the Mouse”, Leo Lionni; “Kitten-loving,” Florence Minor; “National Geographic Little Kids First Big Book of Baby Animals”, Maya Myers; “Edward and Annie: A Penguin Adventure”, Caryn Rivadeneria

Board books for children: “The very hungry caterpillar’s first spring (The world of Eric Carle)”, Eric Carle

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National Library Lovers Month Reminds Us Why Libraries Matter | News https://savemynjlibrary.org/national-library-lovers-month-reminds-us-why-libraries-matter-news/ Sat, 26 Feb 2022 09:45:00 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/national-library-lovers-month-reminds-us-why-libraries-matter-news/ PRINCETON — Along with fire departments, grocery stores and schools, public libraries are an important part of many communities, so their service to the public is celebrated this month. February is National Library Lover’s Month, a time to celebrate the services libraries provide to the public. The region’s libraries are doing more in the internet […]]]>

PRINCETON — Along with fire departments, grocery stores and schools, public libraries are an important part of many communities, so their service to the public is celebrated this month.

February is National Library Lover’s Month, a time to celebrate the services libraries provide to the public. The region’s libraries are doing more in the internet age than lending books.

“It’s still a central place to get information,” said Benjamin Broyles, a clerk at the Princeton Public Library. “We always have a repository of information not found elsewhere; moreover, we have a lot of physical recordings. We have archives of old newspapers and we have access to computers.

“Another example is our room in West Virginia,” he said. “It has a great amount of local history. We also have documents from local authorities which are not widely distributed. Also in the West Virginia Room we have tons of microfilm rolls with newspapers from the early 1900s and we believe some are from the 1800s.”

Facilities like the Princeton Public Library are a good hub for community events, Broyles said.

“We have book sales every month,” he added.

Public libraries also provide computer access to many local people who don’t have internet access, said director Eva McGuire of the Craft Memorial Library.

“We still have a good chunk of our population that doesn’t have internet access,” McGuire said. “They don’t have computers. They are looking for jobs, and many jobs now only have an online application. They use computers at the library to fill them out.

McGuire said the library is helping students do much of their school work through remote and remote learning.

“Just because you give a kid a laptop doesn’t mean they have internet access at home,” she said. “They come to the library to upload work, submit schoolwork and do research.”

Besides access to computers, libraries often hold regional information that is not always available on the Internet. An example is the Eastern Regional Coal Archive at the Craft Memorial Library.

“It’s the story of our region,” McGuire said.

And in the age of e-books, there’s still a place for shelves full of the print variety.

“We still have a lot of people who want to read printed copies of things,” McGuire said.

Programs that the public can attend at the library offer relief from the isolation inflicted on many people by COVID-19.

“I think a lot of people appreciate more being able to go out and attend programs and see others in a safe environment,” she added.

Further south in Welch, the McDowell County Public Library also offers Internet service to its patrons, in an area where access can be particularly difficult to find. and many patrons still want to read books they can hold, said director Barbara Fields. The library also has room Welch Daily News in its archives; some copies date back to around 1918. This makes the library a resource for people researching their family’s past and local history.

“We have a lot of people from out of state contacting us for obituaries, certain records, and we’ll get them,” Fields said. “You’d be surprised. We get three or four calls a day. A man from Jacksonville, Florida called about a murder that happened here.

People come to research the microfilm archives, and some even call the library to find phone numbers, she added. Libraries also offer other resources; for example, they still offer tax forms. and the McDowell County Public Library has a West Virginia History Room with books and exhibits.

“We also have a children’s library and we have story time,” Fields said. The library also has a book club and a music club; the two clubs meet once a month.

Libraries are like community centers, said deputy director Chris Wilkes of the Tazewell County Public Library, which has branches in Tazewell, Va., as well as Bluefield, Va. and Richlands, Va.

“We welcome many different age groups from all walks of life. We have upper-class patrons and lower-class patrons and we welcome them as equals, and that’s how we like to see the library,” Wilkes said. “It’s just a common space for the public, so you can have different people from different groups and demographics in one place.”

The Tazewell County Public Library also runs many outreach programs, he added.

“I will soon be doing programs with the historical society. Our children’s librarian, she goes and works with nursery schools, works with Main Street School in Tazewell which is a private Christian school,” Wilkes said. “We also work a lot directly with high schools. In the area, we have a program where we automatically give out free digital library cards to all students in Tazewell County so they can check out e-books or check out some of our databases; Plus, beyond the books, we have historical resources you probably couldn’t find in other areas. Our Virginia Room has stuff not only about Tazewell, but about Southwest Virginia, about Southern West Virginia.

The library is working to make more local materials available online.

“Right now I have about 100 yearbooks that I’m about to send to the Library of Virginia to digitize for the public,” Wilkes said. “You can be anywhere in the country, but if you want to see your 1973 yearbook, you can download it online; and I’m scanning newspapers here that are from Tazewell county like Clinch Valley News. We digitize them through the Library of Virginia.

Public libraries are important in rural communities like Grundy, Va., said Brian F. Shortridge, director of the Buchanan County Public Library.

“We’re a lot like the town square,” he said. “People can come here regardless of race or age. We are the great democratization of this world. We are no longer just a book depository. We are truly the meeting place where ideas are shared. I think that’s one of the things we can thrive on. Hopefully we will overcome this pandemic and get back to work. »

Like other libraries, the Buchanan County Public Library offers special programs for the public. In an upcoming example, Francis Gary Powers Jr., son of U-2 spy plane pilot Francis Gary Powers, will be at the library Feb. 28 at 6 p.m. He will talk about his father’s experiences before and after being shot down in the Soviet Union.

In another show, Burt Foster, winner of the second season of the History Channel’s Forged In Fire, will be at the library on March 3. The show will begin at 6 p.m. .

“It will describe the process and tools needed to make a knife,” Shortridge said. “He will guide the audience step by step through the forging process. He will present examples of his work and answer questions from the public.

The library is working to serve as many people as possible, he said.

“We try to offer a wide variety of programs for people who have a lot of different interests,” Shortridge said. “We try to serve the general public. We are a public library and we try to take this responsibility seriously.

— Contact Greg Jordan at gjordan@bdtonline.com

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Marathon County Public Library Activities: March https://savemynjlibrary.org/marathon-county-public-library-activities-march/ Thu, 24 Feb 2022 22:44:00 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/marathon-county-public-library-activities-march/ From March 1 through March 31, adults can pick up a free Grab & Go craft kit at any of nine Marathon County Public Library locations. The kit will contain supplies to make a sari silk wrapped bracelet. Free and available while supplies last. For more information, call 715-261-7230. Until May 27, young writers aged […]]]>

From March 1 through March 31, adults can pick up a free Grab & Go craft kit at any of nine Marathon County Public Library locations. The kit will contain supplies to make a sari silk wrapped bracelet. Free and available while supplies last. For more information, call 715-261-7230.


Until May 27, young writers aged 9 to 18 are invited to submit original and unpublished poems for the MCPL Youth Poetry Contest. There is no length limit and each person can enter two poems. Entrants must be residents of Marathon County. Submit nominations to poet@mcpl.us or drop them off in person at any MCPL location. Winners will receive recognition and prizes. For more information, call 715-261-7220.


From March 1-31, the library will offer a free Grab & Go kit for kids at its nine locations. Each kit will contain supplies to make a monster magnet using the art of quilling. Kits are free and available while supplies last and can be picked up any time the library opens. For more information, call 715-261-7220.


Join the library for Family Story Time online. On March 1, we will read a variety of stories celebrating women in history. Plus, check out the Grab & Go kit available for kids at all MCPL locations throughout March! A new story hour is posted every Tuesday at 10 a.m. on MCPL’s YouTube channel, www.youtube.com/MCPLWausau, but you can watch anytime! Free. For more information, call 715-261-7220.


Join the library for Family Story Time online. On March 8, we’ll be reading funny and wacky stories about chickens! A new story hour is posted every Tuesday at 10 a.m. on MCPL’s YouTube channel, www.youtube.com/MCPLWausau, but you can watch anytime! Free. For more information, call 715-261-7220.


The Rothschild branch of the library, 211 Grand Ave., Rothschild, will host a slumber party with stuffed animals on March 10. Kids can drop off one of their stuffed animals at the branch anytime between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. The stuffed friend will spend the night at the library and can then be picked up the next day. Parents will be emailed photos of all the fun shenanigans the toys did during their stay. Free. For more information, call 715-359-6208.

Join the library for Family Story Time online. On March 15, children and families can hear library staff reading picture books about some of their favorite snacks. A new story hour is posted every Tuesday at 10 a.m. on MCPL’s YouTube channel, www.youtube.com/MCPLWausau, but you can watch anytime! Free. For more information, call 715-261-7220.


Wisconsin teens are invited to this virtual hangout hosted by teen librarians from across the state! The hangout/chat will take place on March 15 from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., via Zoom. Teens can break out of a virtual escape room, learn how to tie a Celtic knot, and more. Free. Registration required by visiting https://bit.ly/3HdFSTQ. For more information, call 715-261-7220.

Join the library for Family Story Time online. On March 22, the stories will all feature construction equipment. Plus, listen to a fun nursery rhyme that matches the building theme. A new story hour is posted every Tuesday at 10 a.m. on MCPL’s YouTube channel, www.youtube.com/MCPLWausau, but you can watch anytime! Free. For more information, call 715-261-7220.


Join the library for Family Story Time online! On March 29, the stories will be all about the trains. A new story hour is posted every Tuesday at 10 a.m. on MCPL’s YouTube channel, www.youtube.com/MCPLWausau, but you can watch anytime. Free. For more information, call 715-261-7220.

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Baltimore County Public Library celebrates Black History Month with virtual events – CBS Baltimore https://savemynjlibrary.org/baltimore-county-public-library-celebrates-black-history-month-with-virtual-events-cbs-baltimore/ Sun, 06 Feb 2022 04:12:00 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/baltimore-county-public-library-celebrates-black-history-month-with-virtual-events-cbs-baltimore/ BALTIMORE (WJZ) — To celebrate Black History Month, the Baltimore County Public Library is hosting several events, and this year they’re all virtual. Through songs and lectures, Baltimore-born musician and educator Lea Morris explains the role music played in the civil rights movement. READ MORE: Maryland endures gusty winds and prepares for a cold night […]]]>
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Allen County Public Library explores branch expansion and renovation https://savemynjlibrary.org/allen-county-public-library-explores-branch-expansion-and-renovation/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 01:21:16 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/allen-county-public-library-explores-branch-expansion-and-renovation/ FORT WAYNE, Indiana (WANE) – With increased use and aging buildings, the Allen County Public Library is exploring options for its next chapter. The board met in a special session on Wednesday to hear branch-by-branch reviews from Bostwick Design Partnership, a Cleveland-based architectural firm. The study (download available below) assessed each branch based on size […]]]>


FORT WAYNE, Indiana (WANE) – With increased use and aging buildings, the Allen County Public Library is exploring options for its next chapter.

The board met in a special session on Wednesday to hear branch-by-branch reviews from Bostwick Design Partnership, a Cleveland-based architectural firm.

The study (download available below) assessed each branch based on size versus usage, building condition and expansion capacity for current conditions and 10-year projections.

For example, the Aboite branch is not of adequate size, the lowest rating for building condition, does not allow for future expansion, and cannot be renovated to meet demand expected in 2032.

The cost of the project is unknown as the board faces so many choices. CAPL’s director of community engagement, Stephanny Smith, hasn’t ruled out asking taxpayers for help.

“In yesterday’s meeting, we shared that this would likely result in a referendum and then a place on the ballot to approve the link,” she emailed WANE 15.

“Because we haven’t determined the final scope of the project, we don’t have a dollar amount for what the taxpayer contribution might be. It was also shared that the library had reserves and would be able to contribute up to $ 21 million to the project. “

The public can speak at a meeting on Monday, January 10 at 7 p.m. Registration for the live session is available on the library website. The library plans to offer a public inquiry, open houses and will launch a new website, www.YourACPL.org, on Monday.

“It took us a year to initiate conversations with our community and our library.
staff to get there. This is where the fun part begins. I am delighted to hear what the
the community reflects on the recommendations. Residents of Allen County feel very
logged into the library, and I hope we get a lot of feedback, ”said Susan
Baier, Director General of ACPL.

The final version of the plan, which will be received by the CPRA Board of Directors in April
2022, will reflect community feedback.


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Cincinnati and Hamilton County Public Library staggered hours https://savemynjlibrary.org/cincinnati-and-hamilton-county-public-library-staggered-hours/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 22:41:00 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/cincinnati-and-hamilton-county-public-library-staggered-hours/ All Cincinnati and Hamilton County public library locations will temporarily reduce their hours of operation due to COVID-19 staffing issues. Tuesday to Saturday this week, hours will be Monday to Saturday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Related video above: Ohio reports more than 37,000 cases of COVID-19 over New Years Eve, DayLibrary officials will reassess […]]]>


All Cincinnati and Hamilton County public library locations will temporarily reduce their hours of operation due to COVID-19 staffing issues. Tuesday to Saturday this week, hours will be Monday to Saturday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Related video above: Ohio reports more than 37,000 cases of COVID-19 over New Years Eve, DayLibrary officials will reassess Jan. 7 to determine if they need to extend temporary hours to- beyond Saturday. The library website is still available. Guests can stream and download material 24/7 by clicking here.

All Cincinnati and Hamilton County public library locations will temporarily reduce hours due to staffing issues related to COVID-19.

From Tuesday to Saturday this week, the hours will be Monday to Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. The pitches with Sunday schedules will remain open from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Related video above: Ohio reports more than 37,000 cases of COVID-19 during New Year’s Eve

Library officials will reassess Jan. 7 to determine if they need to extend temporary hours beyond Saturday.

The library website is still available. Guests can stream and download material 24/7 in clicking here.


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Corvallis-Benton County Public Library Clubs and Events https://savemynjlibrary.org/corvallis-benton-county-public-library-clubs-and-events/ Wed, 08 Dec 2021 19:34:03 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/corvallis-benton-county-public-library-clubs-and-events/ The Corvallis-Benton County Public Library always has clubs to join and events to attend. This month is no different, with a variety of virtual meetings to join. Here is a list of what’s happening next week. Senior reading group Readers over 50 can join this monthly book club. The group meets virtually from 1:30 p.m. […]]]>


The Corvallis-Benton County Public Library always has clubs to join and events to attend. This month is no different, with a variety of virtual meetings to join. Here is a list of what’s happening next week.

Senior reading group

Readers over 50 can join this monthly book club. The group meets virtually from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. on the second Monday of each month. This month’s reunion falls on December 13.

Discover more details here.

Storytime Live FaceBook

The library hosts a virtual story time every Tuesday from 10:30 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. via Facebook Live. The next story hour will be on December 14.

Those missing live story time or just wanting to learn more can call 541-766-6568 to listen to a recorded story in English or Spanish. The stories are updated every Tuesday.

More details can be found here.

January Children’s Book Club Kit

Online registration to receive a Kids Book Club kit begins December 15 at 10 a.m. and will remain open until all kits have been claimed. The kit includes the chapter book chosen by the club, various crafting supplies with instructions and discussion prompts.

For kids who are just starting to read chapters, the January Book Club selection is “Hit Start!” Game over, Super Rabbit Boy! By Thomas Flintham. Kits can be picked up from the library or delivered to your home.

Discover more details here.

Sensory story time

Sensory Storytime is a slower paced group for children of all abilities, with a focus on meeting the needs of children with sensory sensitivities. Each story hour is 20 minutes long and follows a schedule that includes a variety of activities, including a rhyme and short stories. The next Sensory Story Time will be on December 15 at 10:30 am Registration for Sensory Story Time closes on December 15.

More details can be found here.

C3 Book Club

The C3 Reading Club is for people 18 and over and meets once a month at 11:00 a.m. on the 3rd Thursday of the month. The December book is “The Night Watchman” by Louise Erdrich.

Each month’s book is delivered to you by the library. The club is currently full, but you can join the waiting list here.

Reading to a dog

Children have the opportunity to practice reading in a stress-free environment – with a dog! The Reading Education Assistance Dog program, also known as READ, allows children to meet a dog and its handler for a ten-minute one-on-one session via Zoom. There are currently slots available between 3:45 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. on December 16, but check the Event calendar for an updated list of times.

Meeting of adolescent counselors

Teens in grades 6 to 12 meet regularly to discuss and provide feedback on teens’ services offered at the library. Teen counselors help at teen events, write book reviews and more.

The next meeting will take place from 4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. on December 17th. Teens interested in joining can find the app here.

By Momoko Baker


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Campbell Co. Public Library urging area residents to participate in new senior vacation card program https://savemynjlibrary.org/campbell-co-public-library-urging-area-residents-to-participate-in-new-senior-vacation-card-program/ Thu, 02 Dec 2021 05:41:13 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/campbell-co-public-library-urging-area-residents-to-participate-in-new-senior-vacation-card-program/ The holidays can be a difficult time for seniors. Simple gestures, like a heartfelt card, can brighten up their day. That’s the premise of the new Cards for Seniors program, an initiative led by the Campbell County Public Library to deliver handmade greeting cards to seniors in the area. Customers can use the supplied supplies […]]]>


The holidays can be a difficult time for seniors. Simple gestures, like a heartfelt card, can brighten up their day. That’s the premise of the new Cards for Seniors program, an initiative led by the Campbell County Public Library to deliver handmade greeting cards to seniors in the area.

Customers can use the supplied supplies located in the kids’ section of each branch to make party cards and drop them off in the designated box by December 22. Library staff will distribute cards to seniors in the area throughout the holiday season.

According to the CDC, loneliness is a serious public health risk that affects a significant portion of the elderly in the United States. They are more likely to experience loneliness due to factors such as living alone, the death of family or friends, chronic illness, and hearing loss.

A 2020 report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine (NASEM) found that about a quarter of people aged 65 and over are socially isolated, which is associated with a 50% increased risk of dementia.

Community care for the elderly is essential to combat loneliness. Reaching out through a thoughtful map can have a big impact in helping individuals feel taken care of.

While there, the children can write a letter to Santa Claus. All CCPL branches have templates that kids can use to send Christmas greetings to the North Pole, or they can get creative and create their own. If clients prefer to submit their letters online, they can do so at www.cc-pl.org. Regardless of the method, letters should be submitted by December 18th with full address and name to give Santa plenty of time to respond before the big day!

Campbell County Public Library


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Ellwood Area Public Library activities for the week of November 29 https://savemynjlibrary.org/ellwood-area-public-library-activities-for-the-week-of-november-29/ Mon, 29 Nov 2021 11:04:09 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/ellwood-area-public-library-activities-for-the-week-of-november-29/ ELLWOOD CITY – The Ellwood City Public Library offers a variety of weekly activities. Information is available by calling the library at 724-758-6458. REMARK The library has partnered with Seneca Library District, Oil Creek Library District, Erie County Public Library, and Crawford County Federated Library System for e-books. You can now use the Overdrive or […]]]>


ELLWOOD CITY – The Ellwood City Public Library offers a variety of weekly activities. Information is available by calling the library at 724-758-6458.

REMARK

The library has partnered with Seneca Library District, Oil Creek Library District, Erie County Public Library, and Crawford County Federated Library System for e-books. You can now use the Overdrive or Libby app to borrow books from the above libraries. Please call the library with any questions.

OPEN

The library is open. Newspapers, magazines and toys will not be available at this time. Wearing a mask, covering the mouth and nose, is compulsory throughout the visit to the building. We will continue to do curbside pickup. Please call us with the recommended book (s), author, genre or material you wish to view and our staff will see that it is alphabetically in the lobby for you. We always make our returns in specially marked containers in our hall. Please do not put donated books in these bins.

The hours are Tuesday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 6.30 p.m., Thursday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. to take your calls, except during the hours indicated above.

The activities that will take place this week include:

TUESDAY

10 am – “Baby Laptime,” a program for babies, toddlers and preschoolers delivered via Facebook.

WEDNESDAY

6:30 pm – “Evening Book Group for Adults” will discuss Kristen Alexander’s “Lost Boy Found” book on Zoom.

THURSDAY

4 pm – “Food 4 Thought Book Group” will discuss “Life as We Knew It” by Susan Beth Pfeffer on Zoom.

6 pm “Holiday Laptime”, our laptime with all the holiday-themed books! This program is done via our Facebook page.

RESERVE THIS DATE

Add some sparkle to your tree! The library will make two creations and take ornaments. The first kit will be in the lobby from December 8. It will stay there until the second begins on December 15th. The second ornament kit will remain in the lobby until December 22. The kit includes everything you will need except glue and scissors.

Subscribe to the monthly e-newsletter to stay up to date with all the programs and activities happening at the library.

MEMORIALS

Here are the commemorative contributions received by the library during the month of November. The papers are published every week in this section and represent a part of the contributions received.

In Memory of Caroll Ann Copper by Jim and Barbara Nagel;

In memory of Freda M. Newton of Thomas and Susan Sommers;

In Memory of Joan Reese Niles by Jay Burcik;

In Memory of Henry L. Taylor by Marcia Glover;

In memory of Louise Delores Volpe Vitullo of Ray and Agnes DeFonde, Joyce E. Boots, Sonny and Janet Elchison, Dan and Stacy Moore, Joanne Foley Tritt.


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