library card – Save My NJ Library http://savemynjlibrary.org/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 16:59:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://savemynjlibrary.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.png library card – Save My NJ Library http://savemynjlibrary.org/ 32 32 February is National Library Lover’s Month https://savemynjlibrary.org/february-is-national-library-lovers-month/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 10:25:37 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/february-is-national-library-lovers-month/ Pleasanton Public Librarian Dorothy Steelman LISA LUNA | PLEASANTON EXPRESS February is National Library Lover’s Month. If you haven’t been through your local libraries lately, you’re definitely missing something. Atascosa County Librarians invite the community to recognize the value of libraries in our community and celebrate how they enrich our lives. The Pleasanton Public Library […]]]>

Pleasanton Public Librarian Dorothy Steelman LISA LUNA | PLEASANTON EXPRESS

February is National Library Lover’s Month. If you haven’t been through your local libraries lately, you’re definitely missing something. Atascosa County Librarians invite the community to recognize the value of libraries in our community and celebrate how they enrich our lives.

The Pleasanton Public Library is located at 115 N. Main St. in downtown Pleasanton.

Dorothy Steelman has served as the Pleasanton Public Librarian since June 2015. From 2002 to 2013, she served as the Lakehills Public Librarian in Bandera County. She shared the story of how her work found her, as at the time she was a stay-at-home mom asking how she could volunteer. Although a bachelor’s degree is not required for library managers in rural areas, the Lakehills librarian was pleased to learn that Steelman had a bachelor’s degree in computer science, as the staff disliked working with computers. The Lakehills librarian had just been hired in Castroville, so she asked Steelman if she was interested in a job. Thus began his career. She then earned her Masters in Library Science through a program at Texas Woman’s University.

Above, young people take part in Toddler Time at the Pleasanton Public Library, led by Gina Stewart.  Toddler Time takes place throughout the year, every Tuesday from 10 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.  LISA LUNA |  PLEASANTON EXPRESS

Above, young people take part in Toddler Time at the Pleasanton Public Library, led by Gina Stewart. Toddler Time takes place throughout the year, every Tuesday from 10 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. LISA LUNA | PLEASANTON EXPRESS

Besides Steelman, the Pleasanton Public Library staff includes Gina Stewart, Kelly Simms and Amanda Seiler, their newest employee.

The county librarians group is close by and offers this much needed support.

“In Atascosa County, we all have a really good relationship with each other,” Steelman said. “If we have a situation where we need another perspective or someone to vent to, we all have a relationship where we can call each other up, and we do.”

Growing up, she never saw herself as a librarian. His family was joking and asking how many times people had told him to “shhh.” Steelman replied that today’s library is different. She tells customers they are welcome to speak in their normal voice. She only draws the line at the library used as a playground. For example, she will not allow children to play hide and seek in the piles of books. She shared how much she loves working in the Brush Country.

“I love working here in Pleasanton. It gave me an opportunity that I didn’t think I would ever have, because I went back and got my master’s degree in 2009.”

Through the special program of TWU in collaboration with the Institute of Museum and Library Sciences, 30 rural library managers had the opportunity to obtain their master’s degree. Steelman was one of two chosen in the South African region and she only had to pay for her books.

“It helped me when I came here to apply and I already had a master’s degree even though I technically didn’t need to have one,” she added.

Steelman likes to let the public know that if you live in Atascosa County, you have the option of having up to five library cards.

“You just need to show proof of Atascosa County residency and you can join one of five county libraries.”

These libraries are Pleasanton, Jourdanton, Poteet, Charlotte and Lytle.

Each library offers different programs and services. Currently, Pleasanton Public Library is the only one that offers Overdrive and Libby. As a larger library, Pleasanton has more public computers.

“Pleasanton has the healthiest budget in the county and we are credited with a population of approximately 24,000,” Steelman said. “That’s why the population served doesn’t really reflect the actual census.”

She is grateful that City Council and the City Manager see the importance of attending meetings and visiting offsite locations. For example, she regularly attends Atascosa Citizens in Action and Atascosa Interagency Council meetings. She visited Coastal Bend College and Our Lady of Grace Catholic School to discuss the use of their databases.

Steelman knows that customer service is important, in addition to being a warm and welcoming place.

Many go to the library to make copies or send faxes. The library also displays flyers on different events, programs, etc. to inform the public. In addition, when it comes to using computers, library staff have to be careful about the help they provide to a patron due to liability issues, especially when it comes to declare taxes, open a bank account, etc.

“We can get you where you need to go, but it’ll be up to you what you need to do,” Steelman explained.

She demonstrated the many features of Libby, which is an application used to access the electronic part of their catalog. It is web based so all you need is internet access and you can access the card catalog from anywhere.

There are two ways to access the home page, either directly from the web address or through the City of Pleasanton at www.pleasantontx.gov. February 22 was the last day you could download Overdrive, which was updated to Libby.

Your screen will ask if you have a library card and then take you to search for a library. Type in Pleasanton’s postcode, 78064, and you’ll see the Lonestar Digital Library.

“The reason he’s saying this instead of the Pleasanton Public Library is because we’re part of a consortium,” Steelman said.

While some libraries allow people to get their library card online, the Pleasanton Public Library does not. You must physically go inside to get a card. Also, if you get a library card for your child, you must bring that child. You can’t get a card for them without them.

The consortium is made up of more than 30 libraries putting their money and shared resources together to “get more for our money,” as Steelman described it. E-books and audiobooks are very expensive, she noted. The city pays $3,000 a year to be part of the consortium.

She shared the pros and cons of each loan model. For example, on a Kindle, no one knows what you are reading. Also, you can vary the font style, color, and font size. Audiobooks are great for listening while you exercise or clean the house. You can vary the speed of the narration and it will even tell you how much time is left.

With Libby, you can search by author, get alerted when that specific author publishes another book, see what’s available at all consortium libraries, find out when your loan expires, put something on hold, and more. You can also create tags, similar to a news feed.

Steelman is happy to talk about Libby and available databases such as Learning Express. People can learn about hobbies and crafts, get your GED, tutorials, small engine repair, and more. The databases are free to any resident of the State of Texas. There is also Career Accelerator which is linked to Indeed. You can learn about job outlook, salary range and more. The databases are peer-reviewed, amazing, and free to those with a library card, shared Steelman.

“We pay for our library to have access and it’s not very expensive. If we were to try to get these databases, each one individually, it would cost the city over $100,000, but the state acts as the middleman and we get it through the state. So we only pay a few hundred dollars a year.

The library offers Toddler Time every Tuesday at 10 a.m. Curbside service is also available Monday, Wednesday and Friday for 1.5 hours in the morning and 1.5 hours in the afternoon. They are very busy during the summer. Even last year without a summer reading, they still hit door counts of 2,650 in June and 2,575 in July.

In addition, the library has an interlibrary loan program. If you want a book and the Pleasanton Library does not have it, they can request that it be loaned to another library. This is a free service that can take anywhere from two days to two weeks. You bring the book back from the library and the staff mails it back to the other library.

The Pleasanton Library also circulates hotspots for $10 a day and you’re limited to a week. You get a kit to use with the adapter, cord, etc. that you signed. There are charges if you break or lose it.

Steelman also explained how public libraries are the community’s 4-1-1. People like to stop in or call, especially when they’re new in town. They ask about phone service, garbage pickup, etc.

“So people know they can do it, they can call their library to find out, or they just come in and use the computer because theirs at home hasn’t been set up yet,” Steelman said. “They need to scan something and we don’t charge for the scan at all because there’s no paper or ink involved.”

The Pleasanton Public Library is open Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Visit them today and discover them. You can also reach them at 830-569-5901.

Look in next week’s Pleasanton Express for articles on the Jourdanton, Poteet and Charlotte libraries.

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The National Library of Lebanon acts as a cultural refuge in these difficult times https://savemynjlibrary.org/the-national-library-of-lebanon-acts-as-a-cultural-refuge-in-these-difficult-times/ Mon, 14 Feb 2022 07:32:08 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/the-national-library-of-lebanon-acts-as-a-cultural-refuge-in-these-difficult-times/ Eighteen months after the 2020 Beirut port explosion, which left thousands of buildings in ruins, the National Library of Lebanon has reopened, following the restoration of the complex of Ottoman buildings in which it resides. Marked by an inauguration ceremony last week attended by Prime Minister Najib Mikati and Minister of Culture Mohammad Mortada, a […]]]>

Eighteen months after the 2020 Beirut port explosion, which left thousands of buildings in ruins, the National Library of Lebanon has reopened, following the restoration of the complex of Ottoman buildings in which it resides.

Marked by an inauguration ceremony last week attended by Prime Minister Najib Mikati and Minister of Culture Mohammad Mortada, a commemorative plaque in the lobby of the library was unveiled to celebrate what is hoped to be the last time the space will have to “reopen”.

“We are here again today to testify and confirm that Beirut was and will remain the mother of poetry and a city that does not despair,” Mikati said during the ceremony. “Despite all the political, economic and social challenges and concerns that surround us, literature and culture will have their place in the heart of this capital, as a living witness that Beirut will not die, and if it is ever destroyed in future other circumstances, it will rise again to remain the beacon of the East.

“The port explosion on August 4, 2020 left drama and pain that has yet to heal, [and will not] before the full truth about what happened is known,” he said. “The National Library, where we meet today after the completion of its restoration works, was and will remain an oasis of hope that brings Lebanese people together and is one of the monuments of culture, thought and Science.”

Windows and interior fittings were ripped open during the explosion, and most electronic equipment had to be replaced. The work was funded by Qatar and the Aliph Foundation, which protects heritage in conflict zones around the world.

“Fortunately, the collection was saved by its prompt removal and transfer to lower storage, in accordance with the library’s preventative preservation plan in the event of a catastrophic event,” Mortada said. The National. “The library has an incredible management team of 22 people who went above and beyond to extract the books from the rubble and were able to clean them up and store them safely until the library was ready again.”

Located in Beirut’s Sanayeh district, the library’s current home – a large Ottoman-era complex built between 1905 and 1907 during the reign of Sultan Abdulhamid II – was not the first.

The institution began as the personal collection of the writer and scholar Viscount Philippe de Tarrazi, from his residence in 1919. On his recommendation, the government founded the Great Library of Beirut in 1922, located in the Prussian School of Deaconesses in downtown Beirut, on which he donated his entire collection and began traveling to collect more books.

A manuscript in the National Library of Lebanon in Beirut.  AFP

“Greater Lebanon was one year old when [Tarrazi] donated his rare collection to the library, which contained more than 20,000 books and about 3,000 manuscripts, thus forming the foundation of the National Library,” says Mortada. “It is the first official institution built with pure Lebanese hands, unlike many national institutions that were established by the French during the Mandate period.

“The knowledge content of this library has increased year by year. Beirut at the time, until recently, was the printing press of the Orient and one of the few open to all cultures, old and new, and a place of debate, which led to a place of free expression which produced hundreds of publishing houses, thousands of books, theaters and exhibitions, a modernist literary movement, poetry and other fine arts; universities, forums, media and press,” he says. “The National Library grew rich from the effects of all this, until its shelves were filled with innovations from all.”

The library is open now, but it won’t be able to play its full role until the electricity problems are resolved.

Mohammad Mortada, Lebanese Minister of Culture

By 1937 the library had moved into what is now the parliament building in Nijmeh Square, where it flourished until the outbreak of the Lebanese Civil War in 1975. In 1979 it closed, having lost more than a Thousand Battle-Rare Manuscripts. and the building becomes uninhabitable.

It was not until 2005 that efforts to revive the library resumed. Qatar has donated $25 million to oversee the restoration of Sanayeh’s current premises. Restoration work on the collection’s 300,000 publications has begun – a process that took nearly two decades.

In December 2018, the library was officially reopened, but closed shortly after for maintenance which was unable to start due to the country’s economic difficulties, followed by damage from the explosion.

People at the reopening ceremony of the National Library of Lebanon in Beirut on February 10.  AFP

While the library may be functional again – capable of having 300 people at a time – there are still many details to make it truly usable. Currently plans for a library card have not been finalized and the country’s power shortages mean there will be limited facilities at times.

“The library is open now, but it won’t be able to play its full role until the power issues are resolved – likely some combination of public power, generators and hopefully renewable energy like panels solar,” says Mortada. “These things we have to take day by day until we can work these things out. For now, the library will be open every day, as long as there is power, otherwise computers to search for books etc. will not work.

The deposit law created in 1924 by General Weygand means that any book published in Lebanon would also give a copy to the library. Due to approximately 40 years of closure in total, the library will likely have gaps in its collection to fill. Mikati also called for the addition of the National Archives for preservation and access by scholars or researchers.

“We are working to consolidate the role of the Ministry of Culture in the protection of this history and in its active transmission to future generations,” says Mortada.

“[We seek] encourage in-kind exchanges provided by libraries and various institutions, through partnership and cooperation, with an emphasis on supporting the knowledge economy, at a time when information has become the engine of globalization . We will implement the project to digitize the collection and its virtual publication to make it accessible to everyone.

“In difficult times, culture remains a common refuge for all peoples, not to make them forget their reality, but to guide them towards the intellectual rules and scientific mechanisms that can overcome it.”

Updated: February 14, 2022, 7:29 a.m.

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Watseka Public Library News | News https://savemynjlibrary.org/watseka-public-library-news-news/ Tue, 25 Jan 2022 05:59:00 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/watseka-public-library-news-news/ The week of January 24, there will be an adult craft to take away! There are still a few STEM crafts to take home for kids while supplies last. If you missed the llama weaving or the paper building blocks, stop by to pick them up. The Blizzard Book Reading Challenge ends on January 31 […]]]>

The week of January 24, there will be an adult craft to take away!

There are still a few STEM crafts to take home for kids while supplies last. If you missed the llama weaving or the paper building blocks, stop by to pick them up.

The Blizzard Book Reading Challenge ends on January 31 and winners will be announced on February 1.

There will be a Preschool Storytime: Penguin and Polar Bear Storytime and Activities on Tuesday, February 2. Plus, if you missed the Inside Storytelling Walk, you’ll have a second chance to do so on February 2.

Fine Free February — We love you and we LOVE our books. The library will waive fines in February as long as the materials are returned to the library in good condition. If you have already returned documents but still have an outstanding fine, please come to the library in February. We will waive the fines when we have verified that you have returned the equipment in good condition. Please return your books!

If anyone is interested in starting a club that meets at the library, please email your proposal to Darcy at watsekadirector@gmail.com

Watseka Public Library is open to the public! If you live within the city limits or own property within the city limits, your library card is free. Non-resident cards are also available for a fee.

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Garrett Public Library News | Garrett Clipper https://savemynjlibrary.org/garrett-public-library-news-garrett-clipper/ Tue, 18 Jan 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/garrett-public-library-news-garrett-clipper/ book sale The library invites users to browse the selection during its current book sale. A variety of books, music CDs, DVDs and books on CD are available. All prizes are by donation only. Home service The Garrett Public Library offers door-to-door service for cardholders. If you are a Garrett resident and do not have […]]]>

book sale

The library invites users to browse the selection during its current book sale.

A variety of books, music CDs, DVDs and books on CD are available.

All prizes are by donation only.

Home service

The Garrett Public Library offers door-to-door service for cardholders.

If you are a Garrett resident and do not have a library card, the staff will be happy to issue you one.

Home service is available for those who are temporarily or permanently confined to their homes.

For more information, call 357-5485.

Evening book club

The evening book club will meet at 6:30 p.m. tonight, January 18.

Visitors are invited to read about their favorite author and share with the group why they might like him.

ceramic tile

The library will be offering a ceramic tile class at 10 a.m. Saturday.

All supplies will be provided free of charge. Advance registration is required.

Participants will design their own ceramic tile using Sharpie markers and rubbing alcohol.

Valentine’s plate

The library will be offering a Valentine’s Day Love Plate Class at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, February 1.

All supplies will be provided free of charge. Advance registration is required at the upstairs loan counter.

Participants will create their plaques using wood laminate, paint and glue.

Technical Tuesdays

Bring your technical questions to the computer area on the library floor at 10 a.m. every Tuesday. Staff will help find answers to questions.

Handicraft program

Patrons are invited to the library at 10 a.m. on Saturday, January 22. Design your own ceramic tile using Sharpie markers and rubbing alcohol. All supplies will be provided free of charge. Advance registration is required.

Take and do

A new project will be announced each month, with free DIY kits available while supplies last.

January’s craft is a penguin bottle cap magnet.

Teen bedroom

The Teen Room (Herzer Hall) will have after-school activities at 3:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday.

Baby story time

Baby Storytime will take place at 11 a.m. every Monday.

Story time for toddlers

Toddler story time will be at 1:00 p.m. every Thursday.

Kids club

The kids’ club offers opportunities to experiment with science, explore arts and crafts, have fun with food, and play with cool activities.

Join the library every Wednesday from 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. No registration is required. All supplies are provided.

Early Learning Kits

These kits are free educational activities — four crafts in each kit.

The learning kits change every month. These can be picked up at the library while supplies last.

Tall Storybook Kits

Need a variety of formats to entertain your kids? Get a Tall Tales Book Kit. Each kit includes three books, one movie, one music CD, one coloring page/activity page. Choose a theme: dinosaurs, animals, bedtime, pirates, superheroes or cats.

Book kits are limited to one per customer.

Viewing Garrett’s History

A historic Garrett exhibit, “Tales as Old as Time: Garrett through the Ages,” is at the library until late summer in the South Corridor display cases. The exhibit features photos and items from the Garrett community, some dating back to the 1800s.

Library Guidelines

Masks are recommended but not mandatory for library staff and users. The library will continue to provide masks to visitors who need them.

Library fines, fees explained

Overdue fines will no longer accumulate on patron accounts.

Administration fees for processing lost or damaged items will no longer be charged. Customers, however, are still responsible for lost or damaged items and replacement costs.

Video games available

The Garrett Public Library has a video game collection that is now available for public circulation.

Games for PlayStation 4, XBox One and Nintendo Switch will be offered.

The collection includes games for all audiences, from ESRB rating E (for everyone) to M (for adult).

Customers can view five games at a time for periods of one week.

Small free library

Thanks to a generous donation from Church at Garrett, the Garrett Public Library has a small free library.

The small free library is located near the west entrance. No library card is required. Visitors can take away any books that interest them.

Gently used books can be donated depending on space availability.

Garrett Public Library staff will periodically refresh and restock the small free library.

Please note that this is not the drop box for returning library materials. The library drop box is located further south in the parking lot and is silver.

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Local News: Cape Town Public Library to celebrate 100th anniversary (1/15/22) https://savemynjlibrary.org/local-news-cape-town-public-library-to-celebrate-100th-anniversary-1-15-22/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 23:05:58 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/local-news-cape-town-public-library-to-celebrate-100th-anniversary-1-15-22/ Steve Mosley relaxes at the Cape Girardeau Public Library. Southeast Missouri File Much can change in the space of 100 years, but the Cape Girardeau Public Library has remained a constant for the community. The library will reach its 100th year of service on June 15. To celebrate, the library will host centennial-themed programs and […]]]>

Steve Mosley relaxes at the Cape Girardeau Public Library.

Southeast Missouri File

Much can change in the space of 100 years, but the Cape Girardeau Public Library has remained a constant for the community.

The library will reach its 100th year of service on June 15. To celebrate, the library will host centennial-themed programs and events for visitors throughout the year.

Events and programs have been designed for people of all ages, according to general manager Katie Hill Earnhart.

Librarians have curated a list of all the best-selling books of the past 100 years for hungry readers to explore. A new centennial-themed library card will be available in February for up to 2,500 patrons at no charge.

Events include a main celebration scheduled for June 15. Details of the event have yet to be released. Announcements of other events will be posted throughout the year on the library’s website, Earnhart said.

The library has seen many homes over the years. It opened in Common Pleas Courthouse Park on June 15, 1922, with local contributions and funds from the Carnegie Corp.

Attempts to bring a public library to Cape Girardeau began shortly in the early 20th century. Railroad pioneer Louis Hock offered $30,000 to erect a library on the condition that the community vote a tax to support it. The tax passed but was later struck down in 1903, according to Southeast Missouri Records.

The old Carnegie Building housed the Cape Girardeau Public Library until 1980 when the library moved to a new facility on Clark Street. The site underwent extensive renovations and expansions in the early 2000s to become the library readers use today.

What began decades ago as a collection of 3,000 volumes has grown into an inventory of nearly 100,000 physical objects. That’s not counting the library’s 22,000 eBooks and audiobooks available for digital download.

Earnhart attributed the library’s longevity to its dedicated patrons.

“We wouldn’t be able to be here if it wasn’t for them,” Earnhart said.

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Longview Public Library Expands Collection in Spanish | Local news https://savemynjlibrary.org/longview-public-library-expands-collection-in-spanish-local-news/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 02:00:00 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/longview-public-library-expands-collection-in-spanish-local-news/ The Longview Public Library has expanded its collection of Spanish-language literature – a response to the region’s growing Hispanic community. Access Services Supervisor Bronwyn Pegues said the additions were made possible by a $ 2,500 grant from the Texas Book Festival, which enabled the library to double its collection. The library has received the grant […]]]>

The Longview Public Library has expanded its collection of Spanish-language literature – a response to the region’s growing Hispanic community.

Access Services Supervisor Bronwyn Pegues said the additions were made possible by a $ 2,500 grant from the Texas Book Festival, which enabled the library to double its collection.

The library has received the grant in the past and used it to expand collections of graphic and children’s novels, Pegues said.

The library offers material in Spanish in the sections for children, young adults and adults.

While the children’s department has a large selection, the adult section previously only had one shelf of materials.

“We were able to make a little section of a shelf bigger, so now it’s double-sided,” Pegues said.

Additions to the Spanish collection include audiobooks, fiction and non-fiction articles.

Pegues said the new articles are in a variety of genres, including historical non-fiction, science fiction, mystery, and even some English translations of works.

The need to expand Spanish adult literature came from reviewing census data for the city and its surroundings and recognizing the large community of Spanish speakers, Pegues said.

“I was under the impression, speaking with (senior library assistant Evelyn Oswald that) this is a fairly small collection that needed to be expanded and will serve the community better,” Pegues said.

The library provides a service where patrons can submit requests for items they would like the library to purchase for its collection.

“We would have people coming in, some could leave with an item and some might not,” Pegues said. “We hope to attract more customers to come and check the items. Before, we didn’t get a lot of inquiries.”

Pegues encourages everyone to get a free library card, which allows patrons to view 15 articles at a time

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22 Things to Do at the Sedona Public Library in the Village in 2022 Independent Verde https://savemynjlibrary.org/22-things-to-do-at-the-sedona-public-library-in-the-village-in-2022-independent-verde/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 07:13:52 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/22-things-to-do-at-the-sedona-public-library-in-the-village-in-2022-independent-verde/ The new year has finally arrived and 2022 is shaping up to be a great year. We settled into our beautiful location in the old Big Park School Library at 25 West Saddlehorn Road. We are excited about the opportunities our new library branch has to build community. Here are 22 things to do at […]]]>


The new year has finally arrived and 2022 is shaping up to be a great year. We settled into our beautiful location in the old Big Park School Library at 25 West Saddlehorn Road. We are excited about the opportunities our new library branch has to build community.

Here are 22 things to do at the Sedona Public Library in the Village in 2022. How many items can you tick off your list?

  1. Meet your friends for coffee and a chat.

  2. Check out a book written by a local author.

  3. Place a heart on the Tree of Kindness donated by Sedona Kind.

  4. Read the Wall Street Journal, the Arizona Republic, or the Red Rock News.

  5. Access the free Wi-Fi on the terrace while enjoying the spectacular view of the red rocks.

  6. Work remotely from one of our small conference rooms.

  7. Check out the latest issue of Consumer Reports.

  8. Add a piece to the puzzle.

  9. Scan documents to your email or USB drive using Library Document Station.

  10. Sign up for an appointment on Tech Tuesday to learn how to download free e-books, audiobooks and e-magazines from our digital collection.

  11. Learn how to create a playlist, place reservations, and freeze and unfreeze your reservations in Aspen Discovery, the new YLN online library catalog.

  12. Browse section 641.77 to find a recipe book for your new air fryer.

  13. Suggest an item to buy.

  14. Share your favorite children’s book with your grandchild.

  15. Admire the indoor and outdoor plants tended by the Sedona Area Garden Club.

  16. Post a flyer for a non-profit organization on the community bulletin board.

  17. Donate items for the pantry. The donation box is located near the loan office.

  18. Download the YLN app and use it to find other library locations, view your library account, and access the digital collection.

  19. Check your library items using your library card in the self-checkout system.

  20. Make an appointment for free notary services on Wednesdays.

  21. Browse the bookstore shelves and buy books to support Friends of the Library.

  22. Support your library by joining FOL, being a sponsor, making a donation, or all of the above!

This list is just the beginning of many library services at the Sedona Public Library in the village. As we head into the New Year, we hope to offer Arizona humanities programs, community book discussions, and other programs in the village. More information to come. Staff and volunteers are there to help; we look forward to assisting you with your library needs.

To ensure the success of the Village of Oak Creek, the library needs your financial support. The Sedona Public Library is a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization. To make a tax-deductible donation to the Sedona Public Library in the village, please visit sedonalibrary.org/donate or send your check to 3250 White Bear Road, Sedona, Arizona 86336. Be sure to designate your donation at the Library of town !


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Milwaukee Public Library Promises to Expand Services to Teens in 2022, Including More Creative Spaces | WUWM 89.7 FM https://savemynjlibrary.org/milwaukee-public-library-promises-to-expand-services-to-teens-in-2022-including-more-creative-spaces-wuwm-89-7-fm/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 22:11:57 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/milwaukee-public-library-promises-to-expand-services-to-teens-in-2022-including-more-creative-spaces-wuwm-89-7-fm/ Milwaukee City Librarian Joan Johnson said a program to get Milwaukee teens to use library resources to help them with their studies and careers is developing in early 2022. the Connected Learning Program for Teens started about five years ago. The Mitchell Street Library has a makerspace and community kitchen for a culinary arts program. […]]]>


Milwaukee City Librarian Joan Johnson said a program to get Milwaukee teens to use library resources to help them with their studies and careers is developing in early 2022.

the Connected Learning Program for Teens started about five years ago. The Mitchell Street Library has a makerspace and community kitchen for a culinary arts program. Johnson defines a makerspace as a room, “where people can come in and create their own content. For Mitchell Street, we focused on the people who create audio and video content, and the people who create graphic arts.

Johnson said the Mitchell Street Library provided hardware and software.

She said that a new makerspace at the Good Hope Library focuses on industrial design and features a laser cutter and a 3D copying machine.

A soon-to-be-available makerspace room at the Washington Park Library will focus on information technology, including computer coding and robotics.

The town librarian said other libraries have sewing machines to help people create content.

Johnson said planning for a new Martin Luther King library includes hearing from the neighboring community about what they want in a creative space. The new King branch is slated to open in fall 2023.

Johnson said the Milwaukee Public Library’s efforts to involve more teens also included hiring of more than 30 teenage interns. She said workers in paid positions “help us develop programs for their peers.”

Johnson said the current starting salary is $ 15.00 per hour and the incentive salary range for residents of the city of Milwaukee is $ 15.45 per hour. Applications and high school transcripts must be submitted no later than 4:45 p.m. on Monday, January 10, 2022.

For more information: mpl.org/TeenInterns

Left to right: Joan Johnson, City of Milwaukee Librarian, Cavalier Johnson, Acting Mayor of Milwaukee, and Jennifer Webb, Head of Library Services at the Washington Park Library, discuss the Teen Connected Learning program at the Washington Park Library.

Acting Milwaukee Mayor Cavalier Johnson joined the City Librarian for a tour of the Washington Park Library on Thursday. He said library programs that engage young people “keep them off the streets. It’s an impact on public safety,” Johnson said. “We’re talking about making investments upstream to stop some of the things that we’re seeing backwards, in terms of public safety and involving people in the justice system.”

Acting Mayor Johnson also spoke of his long personal use of libraries, including a brief period when he was afraid to go to the library.

“I had borrowed a book on Batman and lost it. I thought my fine was going to be astronomical. But luckily they forgave him and I got a new library card years later, ”Johnson said.


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Duluth Public Library goes from page to screen https://savemynjlibrary.org/duluth-public-library-goes-from-page-to-screen/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 05:46:00 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/duluth-public-library-goes-from-page-to-screen/ DULUTH, MN. (KBJR) – Starting on New Years Day, Duluth Public Library is launching a new video and music streaming service. The service will use an application called Hoopla. Hoopla will allow library users to stream videos, music, e-books, audiobooks and more without setting foot in the library. The service is free, but only for […]]]>


DULUTH, MN. (KBJR) – Starting on New Years Day, Duluth Public Library is launching a new video and music streaming service.

The service will use an application called Hoopla.

Hoopla will allow library users to stream videos, music, e-books, audiobooks and more without setting foot in the library.

The service is free, but only for holders of a Duluth Public Library card.

“This is our New Year’s gift to Duluth,” said Steph Myers, Duluth Public Library Supervisor for Adult and Technical Services.

According to Myers, their current digital option doesn’t support video or music streaming, so they change over time.

The Hoopla app allows users to read or stream on devices ranging from smartphones to smart TVs.

“As more and more people turn to streaming services, libraries are trying to keep pace,” Myers said.

According to Myers, it’s important for the library to deliver content to cardholders without increasing their monthly expenses.

“Streaming services can add up for people and with smart TVs becoming more prevalent, it’s a good way for people to access and stream for free from their homes,” Myers said.

For some northerners, Hoopla will not only provide access to more content, but also to a greater variety of content beyond traditional providers.

“A lot of times the streaming platforms I have don’t have the movies I want to watch,” said Stone Riskky, a longtime client of the library.

Riskky is thrilled to be able to stream at home, but said she comes to the library building for more than she can borrow.

“I really love the environment, I love spending time with my friends,” Riskky said, proving that some experiences cannot be streamed.

The length of time items can be borrowed depends on the item.

Movies and TV episodes can be borrowed for three days, music can be borrowed for a week, and eBooks and audiobooks can be borrowed for up to three weeks.

Copyright 2021 KBJR. All rights reserved.


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Duluth Public Library is offering a streaming service to users on January 1 https://savemynjlibrary.org/duluth-public-library-is-offering-a-streaming-service-to-users-on-january-1/ Mon, 20 Dec 2021 15:46:00 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/duluth-public-library-is-offering-a-streaming-service-to-users-on-january-1/ Duluth Public Library announced Monday it will add a streaming service with access to nearly one million titles of audiobooks, e-books, comics, music, movies and TV shows. The service, Hoopla Digital, will start on January 1. “With Hoopla Digital, users can instantly borrow, stream, and download dynamic content with a valid library card,” said a […]]]>


Duluth Public Library announced Monday it will add a streaming service with access to nearly one million titles of audiobooks, e-books, comics, music, movies and TV shows.

The service, Hoopla Digital, will start on January 1.

“With Hoopla Digital, users can instantly borrow, stream, and download dynamic content with a valid library card,” said a press release from the library.

Users must have a library card and will need a library card number and PIN to log in. Users access the service on hoopladigital.com or by downloading a Hoopla Digital app for Apple, Android, AppleTV, Chromecast or Roku devices.

“We are delighted to add this streaming service to the Duluth Public Library’s digital offerings, with funding from the Duluth Library Foundation,” said Director Carla Powers. “With a few clicks, library patrons can borrow music, movies, audiobooks (or) graphic novels. It’s easy (and) convenient.”

Hoopla Digital operates using a model that allows patrons to borrow content immediately, “removing availability constraints and maximizing the power of digital content and Internet distribution,” according to a press release from the library.


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