library library – Save My NJ Library http://savemynjlibrary.org/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 08:55:09 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://savemynjlibrary.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.png library library – Save My NJ Library http://savemynjlibrary.org/ 32 32 Not just to read, but to live: the bold transformation of the National Library https://savemynjlibrary.org/not-just-to-read-but-to-live-the-bold-transformation-of-the-national-library/ Mon, 14 Mar 2022 05:25:27 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/not-just-to-read-but-to-live-the-bold-transformation-of-the-national-library/ A wall projection for Hwang Sun-won’s short story “The Cloudburst” (1952) (NLK) The National Library of Korea, located in Seocho-gu, southern Seoul, on Monday announced the opening of an immersive literary content room experience, Jisikui Gil, which means “Path to Knowledge.” This follows last year’s Ministry of Culture initiative project Shilgam Seojae, which successfully transformed […]]]>

A wall projection for Hwang Sun-won’s short story “The Cloudburst” (1952) (NLK)

The National Library of Korea, located in Seocho-gu, southern Seoul, on Monday announced the opening of an immersive literary content room experience, Jisikui Gil, which means “Path to Knowledge.”

This follows last year’s Ministry of Culture initiative project Shilgam Seojae, which successfully transformed some of South Korea’s ancient writings and archived documents stored in the library into interactive content using multidimensional technologies. This year’s project focuses on modern and contemporary Korean literature.

The Jisikui Gil consists of two main sections: Writer’s Notes and Smart Lounge.

The first section introduces four of the most beloved contemporary Korean literary classics chosen by readers over time. Kim So-wol’s poem, “Azaleas” (1925), Yun Dong-ju’s poem, “Night of Counting the Stars” (1941), Lee Hyo-seok’s short story “When Buckwheat Flowers Bloom” (1936) and Hwang Sun- won’s short story “The Cloudburst” (1952).

Bringing the settings and themes of each work into the backdrop, projections of relevant text, music and digital paintings traverse the wall display. The whole experience in the room makes visitors feel like they are inside memorable scenes from the writers’ works.

A wall projection of Kim So-wol's poem,

A wall projection of Kim So-wol’s poem, “Azaleas” (1925) (NLK)

The Smart Lounge, with AI-based literary content (NLK)

The Smart Lounge, with AI-based literary content (NLK)

The Smart Lounge offers visitors content based on artificial intelligence. It organizes and recommends books based on visitors’ interests. Personalized choices are given by answering a series of questions in a kiosk, such as her favorite season or color. Visitors can also preview the recommended book before diving in, as the show guides them through some of the book’s key features.

“As soon as visitors enter the Jisikui Gil, they will forget that they are in a library,” the library’s project team coordinator told the Korea Herald on Monday. “We hope that such projects can be an opportunity for the library to be recognized as a complex cultural center, breaking with common perceptions of it as a silent and ossified conventional library. Literature will continue to be updated in the first section after most visitors view the content, the coordinator added.

Meanwhile, other cultural events at the library include a special exhibition on Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania called “The Baltic Way”, which runs until April 10. There are also regular screenings of independent national films which open every second and fourth Thursday of the month. at 2 p.m. until December.

For visits to the Immersive Content Rooms and other cultural events organized by the library, reservations are required on the National Library of Korea website, www.nl.go.kr.

By Kim Hae-yeon (hykim@heraldcorp.com)

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system to celebrate National Library Week | County life https://savemynjlibrary.org/system-to-celebrate-national-library-week-county-life/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/system-to-celebrate-national-library-week-county-life/ National Library Week 2022 will take place from April 3-9. This is a time to reflect on the importance of libraries and library workers in communities across our country, and the importance of supporting and defending libraries. The Halifax County and South Boston Public Library System will celebrate National Library Week with two programs at […]]]>

National Library Week 2022 will take place from April 3-9. This is a time to reflect on the importance of libraries and library workers in communities across our country, and the importance of supporting and defending libraries.

The Halifax County and South Boston Public Library System will celebrate National Library Week with two programs at the South Boston Public Library. The library hasn’t held any indoor programming since the pandemic began in 2020, so the return of indoor programming to libraries will be another reason to celebrate.

On Tuesday, April 5, from 5 to 8 p.m., the South Boston Public Library will host a reading of banned books. Copies of several different books that have been challenged or banned will be available for people to read. Everyone in attendance will receive a “Reading Forbidden Books” sticker. Refreshments will be available from 5 p.m.

On Saturday, April 9 at 11 a.m., author Tierra Bethel will discuss her book, “Let There Be Sound,” in the upstairs meeting room of the South Boston Public Library.

A resident of North Carolina, Bethel earned her undergraduate degree from Virginia Tech and her MBA from Liberty University. Having experienced hearing loss growing up, her book helps individuals understand hearing loss and overcome the misconceptions that surround the condition. Refreshments will be served during this program.

Celebrate National Library Week 2022 with the Halifax County and South Boston Public Library System.

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Donation will help rebuild West Lexington Public Library Branch https://savemynjlibrary.org/donation-will-help-rebuild-west-lexington-public-library-branch/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 00:37:21 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/donation-will-help-rebuild-west-lexington-public-library-branch/ The Marksbury Family Foundation has committed the main donation for the fundraising campaign LEXINGTON, Ky. (WTVQ) – The Lexington Public Library and the Lexington Public Library Foundation announced Wednesday that the Marksbury Family Foundation has committed the lead donation for the fundraising campaign to rebuild the corner library branch. from Versailles Road and Village Drive. […]]]>
The Marksbury Family Foundation has committed the main donation for the fundraising campaign

LEXINGTON, Ky. (WTVQ) – The Lexington Public Library and the Lexington Public Library Foundation announced Wednesday that the Marksbury Family Foundation has committed the lead donation for the fundraising campaign to rebuild the corner library branch. from Versailles Road and Village Drive. In recognition of the foundation’s generosity, the new facility will be named the Marksbury Family Branch when it opens in 2024, according to the library.

The library purchased the site in late 2020 after renting the facility for 15 years, with the intention of demolishing the current building.

A new two-story facility will replace it with nearly triple the space available for library services. The new building will include community and study rooms, a dedicated classroom, craft space, outdoor reading area, expanded adult and children’s spaces, and a drive-thru window where customers can pick up and return the borrowed material.

The Library estimates that it will serve approximately 1 million visitors per year at this location.

The Library Foundation has pledged to raise $5.3 million to support this $17 million project through a public-private partnership.

The Marksbury Family Foundation, founded by Davis Marksbury, invests in innovative projects that provide lasting opportunity and change the lives of individuals and communities.

“We are thrilled to invest in this community-wide resource, which provides countless educational resources for everyone in the greater Lexington area,” said Logan Marksbury, president of the Marksbury Family Foundation. “Our family has been very fortunate and we love providing new opportunities for others to succeed through our Foundation.”

The Marksbury Family Foundation has supported the University of Kentucky, the Lexington Leadership Foundation’s Woodhill Community Center, the Blue Grass Community Foundation’s Good Giving Challenge, and many other projects in educational and entrepreneurial spaces.

This donation is the largest commitment in the history of the Lexington Public Library Foundation, which has supported our public library system since 1997.

“The Library Foundation’s fundraising success is a testament to the commitment of our donors and the impact of the Lexington Public Library system,” said Erin Serrate, Chair of the Library Foundation Board of Trustees. . “Like the people it serves, the Library has unlimited potential, and our role is to ensure that the Library has the financial resources it needs to meet the educational needs of our community.

The Library Foundation supports new projects, capital needs and specialized programs. Recent investments include Destination Kindergarten (with the PNC Foundation’s Grow Up Great initiative), the Eastside Branch (contributing $1.3 million to the project), and the Kloiber Foundation STEAM Lab, which will open later this month.

“Our library system thrives when our community comes together,” said Executive Director Heather Dieffenbach. “We are grateful for the support of the Marksbury Family Foundation and the leadership of the Lexington Public Library Foundation. Together, we will accomplish great things to support the citizens of Central Kentucky. For more information about the project or to get involved, please visit www.lexpublib.org/village.

For general information about the Lexington Public Library, their programs and partners, please visit www.lexpublib.org and their social media pages @lexpublib.

Follow the Library Foundation on Facebook at @lexingtonpubliclibraryfoundation or visit www.lexpublib.org/foundation.

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We’re here for everyone in the community – The Daily Mississippian https://savemynjlibrary.org/were-here-for-everyone-in-the-community-the-daily-mississippian/ Fri, 11 Feb 2022 04:18:55 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/were-here-for-everyone-in-the-community-the-daily-mississippian/ When Ridgeland Mayor Gene McGee threatened to withdraw funding from the Ridgeland Public Library for providing LGBTQ+ materials in January, it sparked a media storm that stretched across the country and even overseas, inviting typical Mississippi critics back into media cycles. When Mississippi bestselling author Angie Thomas tweeted a fundraiser for people to donate to […]]]>

When Ridgeland Mayor Gene McGee threatened to withdraw funding from the Ridgeland Public Library for providing LGBTQ+ materials in January, it sparked a media storm that stretched across the country and even overseas, inviting typical Mississippi critics back into media cycles. When Mississippi bestselling author Angie Thomas tweeted a fundraiser for people to donate to the library, he called on library supporters to smear the state as a whole.

Lori Barnes, director of the First Regional Library System, which includes the Oxford Public Library, said local lawmakers have no control over what materials can be accessed at the public library. Barnes said lawmakers are very supportive both financially and actively, and the library couldn’t “do what they do” without them.

But, McGee’s threat to withhold funding remained just that, a threat. He couldn’t legally purge all LGBTQ+ books from the public library.

The story continued to circulate widely, however, what most headlines lacked was an acknowledgment that the Ridgeland Board of Aldermen had rejected the mayor’s actions and that other Mississippi library systems are offering to extensive catalogs of LGBTQ+ material.

Barnes said Oxford Public Library is committed to the freedom to read by providing services for all aspects of the community. There is a very diverse community in Oxford, and the library collection should reflect this diversity.

“Really, one of the beautiful things about working in a library is that we’re there for every person in that community,” said Laura Beth Walker, branch manager of the Oxford Public Library.

CJ Winship, a UM law student from Ridgeland, wrote a recent op-ed from the Mississippi Free Pressexplaining how important it was to her to be able to find LGBTQ+ resources at her local library during a time of deep personal struggle.

“(It) helped me realize that I wasn’t alone in my feelings and that others like me did exist,” said Winship, who now openly identifies as gay. “I found several self-help books that helped reassure me and reassure me that I wasn’t broken.”

Ally Watkins, the Oxford Public Library’s children’s librarian, said there were no major complaints about LGBTQ+ materials in the library. However, the library has a Dispute Policy containing a series of steps that people who wish to discuss materials can follow.

“The library is more than just documents. We offer programs, resources, computers and all kinds of things,” Watkins said. “We do our best to be a gathering place for the community.”

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The Little Lemon Cafe is coming to the Georgetown Public Library https://savemynjlibrary.org/the-little-lemon-cafe-is-coming-to-the-georgetown-public-library/ Wed, 26 Jan 2022 23:57:41 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/the-little-lemon-cafe-is-coming-to-the-georgetown-public-library/ The coffee space on the first floor of the East Wing of the Georgetown Public Library has been vacant since Red Poppy Coffee Co. closed in October 2020. (Hunter Terrell/Community Impact) After a 15 month vacancy, the Georgetown Public Library will once again have a cafe. The Georgetown City Council approved a partnership between the […]]]>

The coffee space on the first floor of the East Wing of the Georgetown Public Library has been vacant since Red Poppy Coffee Co. closed in October 2020. (Hunter Terrell/Community Impact)

After a 15 month vacancy, the Georgetown Public Library will once again have a cafe.

The Georgetown City Council approved a partnership between the Georgetown Public Library and Sweet Lemon Kitchen at its Jan. 25 meeting.

“We are so excited to partner with Rachel and Kevin Cummins to open Little Lemon at the library,” said library manager Sally Miculek.

The library submitted a request for public proposals in November, after completing renovations to the cafe area. Miculek attracted interest from several vendors, but with the support of her staff and the city council, she chose to move forward with the Sweet Lemon team.

“We want people to be comfortable here, and part of the comfort is having access to food and drink in a friendly space,” Miculek said. “Sweet Lemon is known for the quality of its products, the friendliness of its staff, the attention to small details and I think it all goes very well with the library’s emphasis on strong customer service and an attitude. friendly towards the work we do.”

Little Lemon is expected to open this spring.

The cafe is on a five-year contract with three additional one-year renewal options. The contract also states that the cafe’s hours of operation will match library hours, serve as the primary caterer for events, and provide Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission-licensed bartenders when needed.

Additionally, the city requires that the cafe generate a minimum of $19,493 per year, plus 6% in revenue from restaurant sales. This requirement may be adjusted upon renewal of the mandate.

Rachel and Kevin Cummins opened Sweet Lemon in 2014 as a hostel. They changed their name as a dining and events space in 2016.

Little Lemon at the Library will offer a selection of beverages, pastries and light fare for lunch.

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Local News: Cape Town Public Library to celebrate 100th anniversary (1/15/22) https://savemynjlibrary.org/local-news-cape-town-public-library-to-celebrate-100th-anniversary-1-15-22/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 23:05:58 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/local-news-cape-town-public-library-to-celebrate-100th-anniversary-1-15-22/ Steve Mosley relaxes at the Cape Girardeau Public Library. Southeast Missouri File Much can change in the space of 100 years, but the Cape Girardeau Public Library has remained a constant for the community. The library will reach its 100th year of service on June 15. To celebrate, the library will host centennial-themed programs and […]]]>

Steve Mosley relaxes at the Cape Girardeau Public Library.

Southeast Missouri File

Much can change in the space of 100 years, but the Cape Girardeau Public Library has remained a constant for the community.

The library will reach its 100th year of service on June 15. To celebrate, the library will host centennial-themed programs and events for visitors throughout the year.

Events and programs have been designed for people of all ages, according to general manager Katie Hill Earnhart.

Librarians have curated a list of all the best-selling books of the past 100 years for hungry readers to explore. A new centennial-themed library card will be available in February for up to 2,500 patrons at no charge.

Events include a main celebration scheduled for June 15. Details of the event have yet to be released. Announcements of other events will be posted throughout the year on the library’s website, Earnhart said.

The library has seen many homes over the years. It opened in Common Pleas Courthouse Park on June 15, 1922, with local contributions and funds from the Carnegie Corp.

Attempts to bring a public library to Cape Girardeau began shortly in the early 20th century. Railroad pioneer Louis Hock offered $30,000 to erect a library on the condition that the community vote a tax to support it. The tax passed but was later struck down in 1903, according to Southeast Missouri Records.

The old Carnegie Building housed the Cape Girardeau Public Library until 1980 when the library moved to a new facility on Clark Street. The site underwent extensive renovations and expansions in the early 2000s to become the library readers use today.

What began decades ago as a collection of 3,000 volumes has grown into an inventory of nearly 100,000 physical objects. That’s not counting the library’s 22,000 eBooks and audiobooks available for digital download.

Earnhart attributed the library’s longevity to its dedicated patrons.

“We wouldn’t be able to be here if it wasn’t for them,” Earnhart said.

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Public library open in Gedaref https://savemynjlibrary.org/public-library-open-in-gedaref/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 04:29:27 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/public-library-open-in-gedaref/ (MENAFN- Sudanow Magazine) GEDAREF (Sudan) – The eastern town of Gedaref has seen the rehabilitation and inauguration of its public library by the Nirvana Cultural Foundation. This is a new addition from the Nirvana Cultural Foundation to the legacy of UK Library Ranfurly, the founder of Gedaref Public Library. The old library has 1,175 textbooks […]]]>


(MENAFN- Sudanow Magazine)

GEDAREF (Sudan) – The eastern town of Gedaref has seen the rehabilitation and inauguration of its public library by the Nirvana Cultural Foundation.

This is a new addition from the Nirvana Cultural Foundation to the legacy of UK Library Ranfurly, the founder of Gedaref Public Library.

The old library has 1,175 textbooks on elementary physics, statistical physics, general chemistry, unified mathematics and biology. The Ranfurly Days shelves still hold academic references to surgery, kidney transplantation, microbiology, histology, tropical infectious disease, and nutrition. There are a number of specialist dictionaries related to English, French, Technology, Natural History, Technology, and Genetics. In addition, there are 24 copies of different volumes of the Encyclopedia Britannica.

In a ceremony honored by Foundation Director Muhannad Aldabi and Alwaseela Fath Alrahman, Director of the Culture and Information Administration of Gedaref State, it was also announced that the Foundation will open five other libraries in other localities of the state before the end of March, according to a protocol signed with the Nervana Foundation.

Mr. Muhannad announced the donation of 500 medical reference books to the library. The shipment, which will be delivered at a later date, will also include an additional electronic library.

Muhannad said he was totally committed to launching a cultural cinema of documentary cultural films at the library.

He said that a training center for young people and women as well as a center for children will also be launched.

Nirvana will also publish cultural books for neighborhood children.

Muhannad also pledged to host a monthly workshop on Creative Writing and the Reading Marathon.

Abdul-Aziz Ali Omer, secondary school teacher and writer, said: “I was delighted to visit the library for various reasons: First, she received a collection of books which depict various stimulating writing experiences. for me in translation and to pursue my journalistic aspirations. In addition, I share the hobby of reading with many people, the library has recovered some lost care after suffering from negligence which one day prompted a remark from one of the readers; The books here look like very old manuscripts!

many of the books here bear autographs and the seal of the International Rescue Committee, currently operating in Gedaref State as well as the RanFurly Library in memory of Lord Ranfurly, a British politician, former member of the House of Commons and governor of Newzealnd during the reign of Queen Victoria, says Omer. In 1994, the name of the RanFurly library was converted to “Book Aid International” whose patron since 1966 is Prince Philip.

TO FINISH

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Documenting the pandemic – how the NZ Archives and the National Library are keeping tabs https://savemynjlibrary.org/documenting-the-pandemic-how-the-nz-archives-and-the-national-library-are-keeping-tabs/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/documenting-the-pandemic-how-the-nz-archives-and-the-national-library-are-keeping-tabs/ The National Library – the one that houses Te Tiriti o Waitangi – collect memes. For millennia, humans have documented their time in unusual and humorous ways that people before or after did not understand. During the Spanish Flu pandemic of 1918, people shared cartoons and jokes that shed light on a terrible situation, many […]]]>


The National Library – the one that houses Te Tiriti o Waitangi collect memes.

For millennia, humans have documented their time in unusual and humorous ways that people before or after did not understand.

During the Spanish Flu pandemic of 1918, people shared cartoons and jokes that shed light on a terrible situation, many of which now make no sense.

Things are no different in the 21st century, but today technology is revolutionizing the way we communicate.

READ MORE:
* Forgotten by the cultural sector, the queer communities of Aotearoa are documenting themselves
* The National Library signs a “historic” agreement to donate 600,000 books to the online archives
* Treaty bite marks underscore the importance of our national archives

So, as part of their work to document the Covid-19 pandemic, Alexander Turnbull library staff keep an eye out for popular memes.

Associate Chief Librarian Jessica Moran said staff also kept a recording of the IMDB page of the daily Covid-19 press conference and accompanying comments.

“Once we realized there was this IMDB, with all the comments, we collected it through our web archiving program, and stuff like that, you know, we have a fleeting collection of paper. very rich – going back 150, 200 years.

“And they [memes] only makes sense if you are in this community and this world and get all the references and jokes about the jokes. So part of that was a fun thing to collect, it gives us a little bit of a breathing space, but also, it gives you a bit of that context of the way people were talking.

Jessica Moran, Head of Digital Collections Services at the National Library.

Monique Ford / Stuff

Jessica Moran, Head of Digital Collections Services at the National Library.

The library also collects all written news, digital and physical copies, as well as any books written in New Zealand.

People donate personal journals – again, physical books or online journals such as daily videos on Facebook, for example – photos, letters, anything related to their experience with the pandemic.

Te Pouhuaki National Librarian Rachel Esson said Archives New Zealand documents official ministry records, but the National Library is looking beyond that.

“Our focus is a lot more on the company, and in the reaction of people, and in trying to be representative by gathering all of these different voices and perspectives,” Esson said.

“I’ve always loved a story that a colleague who worked at the Archives told when there was a lot of work going on with the WWI commemorations.

“He said the archives contained what officers thought of soldiers, so this official record, and the library contained what soldiers thought of officers, which was much more interesting from my point of view. Wasn’t it that sanitized view? “

Diseases have come before, like swine or bird flu, and have not caused a lasting global impact like the Covid-19 pandemic.

Library staff said the most recent event of such significance is likely World War II, when the entire world was essentially shut down for a period.

Abi Beatson said photos showing Wellington's empty streets showed the impact of the pandemic.

Ross Giblin / Stuff

Abi Beatson said photos showing Wellington’s empty streets showed the impact of the pandemic.

The library’s digital archivist, Abi Beatson, said an item from the Alexander Turnbull collection is now stuck in his mind.

“This is a photograph of the streets of Wellington which are completely empty during the level four lockdown. This was donated by a photographer, ”Beatson said.

“I think there is one element that really speaks to the enormity of the impact of this pandemic, of the fact that it has managed to clear our streets of the hustle and bustle of daily activity. It’s objects like that that really help tell the significance of this event.

Down the road from the Alexander Turnbull Library is the New Zealand Archives base.

It plays a key role in documenting the government’s response to major events, but documents, videos and other material recorded by a government agency are not returned to the Archives until 25 years after the fact.

During a major event, the Archives conducts audits and advises agencies on what information they should store and make sure they are doing what they are told.

Vernon Wybrow, director of the Disposal and Acquisition team at the Archives, said his team makes sure the right information is collected and the Archives has the technology to accept the information.

“The recordings we get are about a generation after they’re created, basically,” Wybrow said. “Right now the records we’re getting are a hybrid mix of paper and digital, so that’s what was created 25 years ago, that’s what we’re dealing with now.

Cartoons and gifs created by Toby Morris and Siouxsie Wiles are part of the collection of the National Library.

Toby Morris; Siouxsie Wiles / Supplied

Cartoons and gifs created by Toby Morris and Siouxsie Wiles are part of the collection of the National Library.

“But if we take what’s going on now and how these recordings are being created now, it’s pretty much digital. And in 25 years, that’s the kind of thing we’ll be dealing with.

Government record keeping director Antony Moss said the Archives had consulted with government agencies on their new duties and what should be archived.

For example, he said the managed system of isolation and quarantine is brand new and something that has never been seen before, so the Archives are making sure that the Department of Business, Innovation and ‘Emploi documents everything he owes around the MIQ.

They also gave advice on things like keeping records in government buildings or the upcoming vaccine pass system.

“The rules that existed before Covid pretty much apply,” Moss said. “In today’s environment, they still make sense. But when there are areas of confusion, we offer advice to agencies. “

One area of ​​confusion has been Zoom meetings, with agencies debating whether to keep all of the recorded video of a meeting, or just the minutes as before.

Wybrow said that in some situations the minutes and a summary are sufficient, but for larger or meaningful meetings they expect agencies to keep and archive the full video.

He said another area of ​​interest is algorithms.

Groceries waiting in a queue outside Pak N Save in Royal Oak.

DAVID WHITE / STUFF

Groceries waiting in a queue outside Pak N Save in Royal Oak.

“One of the challenges we’ll face is how to make sure that an algorithm is represented accurately so that you have the context in which a decision was made,” Wybrow said.

“If you allow an algorithm to make the decisions for you, at least you need to know what the basis of the algorithm is to make that decision. “

They said agencies need to be able to explain how their algorithms work and keep that data for later review.

The Archives and the National Library also have Treaty of Waitangi obligations, but they are broader in scope for the Archives.

For example, if a treaty claim were made regarding government decision making during the pandemic and the impact of those decisions on Maori, the Archives would play a key role in providing evidence to the Crown or Maori.

Wybrow said the treaty is one of the three key principles of information retention decisions.

As for memes, unless they were used for official government business, they are unlikely to be kept in the National Archives.


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Gallery: The National Library moves to a temporary home | Galleries https://savemynjlibrary.org/gallery-the-national-library-moves-to-a-temporary-home-galleries/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 09:53:00 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/gallery-the-national-library-moves-to-a-temporary-home-galleries/ “We call our temporary home the small building of the National Library, where we will stay for the next four years,” Director Janne Andresoo said in her speech, adding that it is the readers who make a library and not books and books. walls. “We really need you. Your presence helps create a library space […]]]>


“We call our temporary home the small building of the National Library, where we will stay for the next four years,” Director Janne Andresoo said in her speech, adding that it is the readers who make a library and not books and books. walls.

“We really need you. Your presence helps create a library space from a single room. We have the skills and the knowledge. You hold the soul and the content. Come see, come read, stay with it. books, “said the director of the national library. .

The library move was symbolically completed by a delivery robot, which brought the last book – “National Library of Estonia 1918-2018” by Piret Lotman (“Eesti Rahvusraamatukogu ajalugu 1918-2018”) – to the Narva building maantee 11.

“This book tells the story of the guardian of Estonia’s cultural heritage and it is important that the book is also kept in this building,” Andersoo said.

All usual services and activities will be available in the new building in downtown Tallinn. The LVLup! The video game museum has also moved to the new building. The “Petit Bâtiment” will be open from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. on weekdays and from 12 p.m. to 7 p.m. on Saturdays. The library is closed on Sundays.

Reconstruction work on the National Library of Tõnismäe building will start this year and is expected to last until 2025. € 53 million has been allocated for the reconstruction of the National Library of Estonia as part of the government’s budget strategy and the renovated building in Tõnismäe is slated to open by 2025.

The temporary house of the national library on Narva maantee 11. Source: Siim Lõvi / ERR

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Calendar of Upcoming Events at the Lubbock Public Library, January 2-8 | KLBK | KAMC https://savemynjlibrary.org/calendar-of-upcoming-events-at-the-lubbock-public-library-january-2-8-klbk-kamc/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 15:30:32 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/calendar-of-upcoming-events-at-the-lubbock-public-library-january-2-8-klbk-kamc/ LUBBOCK, Texas (press release) – The following is a press release from the Lubbock Public Library: In-person storytelling hours at the Lubbock Public Library Come to the library for preschool story time! The program for this week is: Mahon Library (1306 9th Street) – Tuesday January 4, 10:30 amPatterson Branch Library (1836 Parkway Drive) – […]]]>


LUBBOCK, Texas (press release) – The following is a press release from the Lubbock Public Library:

In-person storytelling hours at the Lubbock Public Library
Come to the library for preschool story time!

The program for this week is:

Mahon Library (1306 9th Street) – Tuesday January 4, 10:30 am
Patterson Branch Library (1836 Parkway Drive) – Tuesday, January 4, 11:30 a.m.
Groves Branch Library (5520 19th Street) – Wednesday, January 5, 10:30 a.m.
Godeke Branch Library (5034 Frankford Avenue) – Thursday, January 6, 10:30 a.m.

Virtual Story Time with Lubbock Public Library
Tuesday 4 January
10:30

Join the library at www.Facebook.com/LubbockLibrary for Virtual Story Time.

Game Night at Groves Branch Library
Tuesday 4 January
6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.

Join us for a fun night of board games, card games, video games and more! For ages 8 and up at Groves Branch Library, 5520 19th Street. For more information, call 806-767-3733.

Storytime for toddlers at the Godeke branch library
Wednesday 5 January
12:30 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.

Meet at the Godeke Branch Library, 5034 Frankford Avenue, for a story hour and free book, courtesy of Literacy Lubbock. For more information call Literacy Lubbock at 806-775-3634

Adult Computer Classes at Groves Branch Library
Wednesday 5 January
3:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Join us at Groves Branch Library, 5520 19th Street for basic adult computer lessons. Each week this month we’ll be covering a different topic! This week is the basics of computers and the Internet where we will teach you the basics of computers and surfing the Internet. Whether you are a beginner or just need a refresher, this course is for you! For more information, call 806-767-3733.

Worth the wait: a fertility support group at the Mahon library
Wednesday 5 January
6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.

This new peer-run support group / book club at Mahon Library, 1306 9th Street, is for those struggling with infertility, miscarriages or infant loss. It will meet on the first Wednesday of each month. For more information, contact Mahon at 806-775-2835.

GED Course at Patterson Branch Library
Saturday 8 January
10:00 AM

Literacy Lubbock will be hosting a brand new, free GED class reunion at the Patterson Branch Library, 1836 Parkway Drive. This course will give you the tips and tricks you need to pass the GED test! You must be registered with Literacy Lubbock to attend. Registration is free! For more information, contact Lubbock Literacy at 806-775-3634

Robin’s Nest tutoring at Lubbock Public Library
The library is happy to announce in-person tutoring for K-12 students at the library. This is free tutoring for a variety of topics. Learn more and register at www.robinsnesttutoring.com. Walk-ins are also welcome.

The dates and times are:

Godeke Branch Library (5034 Frankford Avenue) – Saturday, January 8, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Patterson Branch Library (1836 Parkway Drive) – Saturday, January 8, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Groves Cinema at the Groves Branch Library
Saturday 8 January
2:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Watch a movie from a popular horror movie franchise (Rated R) before the final sequel hits theaters. Refreshments will be provided at Groves Branch Library, 5520 19th Street. For ages 16 and over. For more information on the title, call 806-767-3733.

Nutrition 101: New Years Resolutions at the Mahon Library
Saturday 8 January
3:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Start the New Year by learning to make healthier food choices! Join us at the Mahon Library, 1306 9th Street, for a Free Seminar Led by a Certified Nutritional Health Coach from Natural Grocers and learn how to survive today’s food jungle and keep your New Years Resolution! For more information, contact 806-775-2835.

(City of Lubbock press release / Lubbock Public Library)


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