library staff – Save My NJ Library http://savemynjlibrary.org/ Tue, 08 Mar 2022 05:01:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://savemynjlibrary.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.png library staff – Save My NJ Library http://savemynjlibrary.org/ 32 32 Mesa Public Library Partnership Brings New Sensory Programming to Los Alamos – Los Alamos Reporter https://savemynjlibrary.org/mesa-public-library-partnership-brings-new-sensory-programming-to-los-alamos-los-alamos-reporter/ Tue, 08 Mar 2022 04:01:34 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/mesa-public-library-partnership-brings-new-sensory-programming-to-los-alamos-los-alamos-reporter/ COUNTY NEWS RELEASE Through a collaboration between Mesa Public Library and Las Cumbres Community Services, a new Sensory Friendly Movement and Music program is offered free of charge to children ages 0-6 and their caregivers. The program will take place on the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month from 9:30 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. […]]]>

COUNTY NEWS RELEASE

Through a collaboration between Mesa Public Library and Las Cumbres Community Services, a new Sensory Friendly Movement and Music program is offered free of charge to children ages 0-6 and their caregivers. The program will take place on the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month from 9:30 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. starting March 9and. The program will be held at the new Las Cumbres Community Services site in the former Playschool Montessori building, 1060 Nugget St., Los Alamos.

Trained facilitators will use gentle movement, low lighting, natural voices, limited props, and plenty of personal space to create a welcoming and accepting program for neurodiverse children. Program staff welcomes feedback from families in order to provide the best possible program.

The partnership between Mesa Public Library and Las Cumbres grew out of the Community Educator’s Network, a monthly meeting of community educator minds hosted by Youth Services Librarian Melissa Mackey. Mackey understood that the library can be too stimulating a setting and saw an opportunity to bring the popular library program, Music and Movement, offsite to the Las Cumbres community. “We wanted it for a long time; patrons have expressed a need. Library staff are thrilled to partner with Las Cumbres to offer our most popular library program framed differently,” says Melissa.

Program dates are subject to change due to ongoing COVID-19 precautions, and anyone interested in attending should contact the Mesa Public Library Youth Services Department for the most up-to-date information at (505) 668-8257.

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Marathon County Public Library Activities: March https://savemynjlibrary.org/marathon-county-public-library-activities-march/ Thu, 24 Feb 2022 22:44:00 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/marathon-county-public-library-activities-march/ From March 1 through March 31, adults can pick up a free Grab & Go craft kit at any of nine Marathon County Public Library locations. The kit will contain supplies to make a sari silk wrapped bracelet. Free and available while supplies last. For more information, call 715-261-7230. Until May 27, young writers aged […]]]>

From March 1 through March 31, adults can pick up a free Grab & Go craft kit at any of nine Marathon County Public Library locations. The kit will contain supplies to make a sari silk wrapped bracelet. Free and available while supplies last. For more information, call 715-261-7230.


Until May 27, young writers aged 9 to 18 are invited to submit original and unpublished poems for the MCPL Youth Poetry Contest. There is no length limit and each person can enter two poems. Entrants must be residents of Marathon County. Submit nominations to poet@mcpl.us or drop them off in person at any MCPL location. Winners will receive recognition and prizes. For more information, call 715-261-7220.


From March 1-31, the library will offer a free Grab & Go kit for kids at its nine locations. Each kit will contain supplies to make a monster magnet using the art of quilling. Kits are free and available while supplies last and can be picked up any time the library opens. For more information, call 715-261-7220.


Join the library for Family Story Time online. On March 1, we will read a variety of stories celebrating women in history. Plus, check out the Grab & Go kit available for kids at all MCPL locations throughout March! A new story hour is posted every Tuesday at 10 a.m. on MCPL’s YouTube channel, www.youtube.com/MCPLWausau, but you can watch anytime! Free. For more information, call 715-261-7220.


Join the library for Family Story Time online. On March 8, we’ll be reading funny and wacky stories about chickens! A new story hour is posted every Tuesday at 10 a.m. on MCPL’s YouTube channel, www.youtube.com/MCPLWausau, but you can watch anytime! Free. For more information, call 715-261-7220.


The Rothschild branch of the library, 211 Grand Ave., Rothschild, will host a slumber party with stuffed animals on March 10. Kids can drop off one of their stuffed animals at the branch anytime between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. The stuffed friend will spend the night at the library and can then be picked up the next day. Parents will be emailed photos of all the fun shenanigans the toys did during their stay. Free. For more information, call 715-359-6208.

Join the library for Family Story Time online. On March 15, children and families can hear library staff reading picture books about some of their favorite snacks. A new story hour is posted every Tuesday at 10 a.m. on MCPL’s YouTube channel, www.youtube.com/MCPLWausau, but you can watch anytime! Free. For more information, call 715-261-7220.


Wisconsin teens are invited to this virtual hangout hosted by teen librarians from across the state! The hangout/chat will take place on March 15 from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., via Zoom. Teens can break out of a virtual escape room, learn how to tie a Celtic knot, and more. Free. Registration required by visiting https://bit.ly/3HdFSTQ. For more information, call 715-261-7220.

Join the library for Family Story Time online. On March 22, the stories will all feature construction equipment. Plus, listen to a fun nursery rhyme that matches the building theme. A new story hour is posted every Tuesday at 10 a.m. on MCPL’s YouTube channel, www.youtube.com/MCPLWausau, but you can watch anytime! Free. For more information, call 715-261-7220.


Join the library for Family Story Time online! On March 29, the stories will be all about the trains. A new story hour is posted every Tuesday at 10 a.m. on MCPL’s YouTube channel, www.youtube.com/MCPLWausau, but you can watch anytime. Free. For more information, call 715-261-7220.

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February is National Library Lover’s Month https://savemynjlibrary.org/february-is-national-library-lovers-month/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 10:25:37 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/february-is-national-library-lovers-month/ Pleasanton Public Librarian Dorothy Steelman LISA LUNA | PLEASANTON EXPRESS February is National Library Lover’s Month. If you haven’t been through your local libraries lately, you’re definitely missing something. Atascosa County Librarians invite the community to recognize the value of libraries in our community and celebrate how they enrich our lives. The Pleasanton Public Library […]]]>

Pleasanton Public Librarian Dorothy Steelman LISA LUNA | PLEASANTON EXPRESS

February is National Library Lover’s Month. If you haven’t been through your local libraries lately, you’re definitely missing something. Atascosa County Librarians invite the community to recognize the value of libraries in our community and celebrate how they enrich our lives.

The Pleasanton Public Library is located at 115 N. Main St. in downtown Pleasanton.

Dorothy Steelman has served as the Pleasanton Public Librarian since June 2015. From 2002 to 2013, she served as the Lakehills Public Librarian in Bandera County. She shared the story of how her work found her, as at the time she was a stay-at-home mom asking how she could volunteer. Although a bachelor’s degree is not required for library managers in rural areas, the Lakehills librarian was pleased to learn that Steelman had a bachelor’s degree in computer science, as the staff disliked working with computers. The Lakehills librarian had just been hired in Castroville, so she asked Steelman if she was interested in a job. Thus began his career. She then earned her Masters in Library Science through a program at Texas Woman’s University.

Above, young people take part in Toddler Time at the Pleasanton Public Library, led by Gina Stewart.  Toddler Time takes place throughout the year, every Tuesday from 10 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.  LISA LUNA |  PLEASANTON EXPRESS

Above, young people take part in Toddler Time at the Pleasanton Public Library, led by Gina Stewart. Toddler Time takes place throughout the year, every Tuesday from 10 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. LISA LUNA | PLEASANTON EXPRESS

Besides Steelman, the Pleasanton Public Library staff includes Gina Stewart, Kelly Simms and Amanda Seiler, their newest employee.

The county librarians group is close by and offers this much needed support.

“In Atascosa County, we all have a really good relationship with each other,” Steelman said. “If we have a situation where we need another perspective or someone to vent to, we all have a relationship where we can call each other up, and we do.”

Growing up, she never saw herself as a librarian. His family was joking and asking how many times people had told him to “shhh.” Steelman replied that today’s library is different. She tells customers they are welcome to speak in their normal voice. She only draws the line at the library used as a playground. For example, she will not allow children to play hide and seek in the piles of books. She shared how much she loves working in the Brush Country.

“I love working here in Pleasanton. It gave me an opportunity that I didn’t think I would ever have, because I went back and got my master’s degree in 2009.”

Through the special program of TWU in collaboration with the Institute of Museum and Library Sciences, 30 rural library managers had the opportunity to obtain their master’s degree. Steelman was one of two chosen in the South African region and she only had to pay for her books.

“It helped me when I came here to apply and I already had a master’s degree even though I technically didn’t need to have one,” she added.

Steelman likes to let the public know that if you live in Atascosa County, you have the option of having up to five library cards.

“You just need to show proof of Atascosa County residency and you can join one of five county libraries.”

These libraries are Pleasanton, Jourdanton, Poteet, Charlotte and Lytle.

Each library offers different programs and services. Currently, Pleasanton Public Library is the only one that offers Overdrive and Libby. As a larger library, Pleasanton has more public computers.

“Pleasanton has the healthiest budget in the county and we are credited with a population of approximately 24,000,” Steelman said. “That’s why the population served doesn’t really reflect the actual census.”

She is grateful that City Council and the City Manager see the importance of attending meetings and visiting offsite locations. For example, she regularly attends Atascosa Citizens in Action and Atascosa Interagency Council meetings. She visited Coastal Bend College and Our Lady of Grace Catholic School to discuss the use of their databases.

Steelman knows that customer service is important, in addition to being a warm and welcoming place.

Many go to the library to make copies or send faxes. The library also displays flyers on different events, programs, etc. to inform the public. In addition, when it comes to using computers, library staff have to be careful about the help they provide to a patron due to liability issues, especially when it comes to declare taxes, open a bank account, etc.

“We can get you where you need to go, but it’ll be up to you what you need to do,” Steelman explained.

She demonstrated the many features of Libby, which is an application used to access the electronic part of their catalog. It is web based so all you need is internet access and you can access the card catalog from anywhere.

There are two ways to access the home page, either directly from the web address or through the City of Pleasanton at www.pleasantontx.gov. February 22 was the last day you could download Overdrive, which was updated to Libby.

Your screen will ask if you have a library card and then take you to search for a library. Type in Pleasanton’s postcode, 78064, and you’ll see the Lonestar Digital Library.

“The reason he’s saying this instead of the Pleasanton Public Library is because we’re part of a consortium,” Steelman said.

While some libraries allow people to get their library card online, the Pleasanton Public Library does not. You must physically go inside to get a card. Also, if you get a library card for your child, you must bring that child. You can’t get a card for them without them.

The consortium is made up of more than 30 libraries putting their money and shared resources together to “get more for our money,” as Steelman described it. E-books and audiobooks are very expensive, she noted. The city pays $3,000 a year to be part of the consortium.

She shared the pros and cons of each loan model. For example, on a Kindle, no one knows what you are reading. Also, you can vary the font style, color, and font size. Audiobooks are great for listening while you exercise or clean the house. You can vary the speed of the narration and it will even tell you how much time is left.

With Libby, you can search by author, get alerted when that specific author publishes another book, see what’s available at all consortium libraries, find out when your loan expires, put something on hold, and more. You can also create tags, similar to a news feed.

Steelman is happy to talk about Libby and available databases such as Learning Express. People can learn about hobbies and crafts, get your GED, tutorials, small engine repair, and more. The databases are free to any resident of the State of Texas. There is also Career Accelerator which is linked to Indeed. You can learn about job outlook, salary range and more. The databases are peer-reviewed, amazing, and free to those with a library card, shared Steelman.

“We pay for our library to have access and it’s not very expensive. If we were to try to get these databases, each one individually, it would cost the city over $100,000, but the state acts as the middleman and we get it through the state. So we only pay a few hundred dollars a year.

The library offers Toddler Time every Tuesday at 10 a.m. Curbside service is also available Monday, Wednesday and Friday for 1.5 hours in the morning and 1.5 hours in the afternoon. They are very busy during the summer. Even last year without a summer reading, they still hit door counts of 2,650 in June and 2,575 in July.

In addition, the library has an interlibrary loan program. If you want a book and the Pleasanton Library does not have it, they can request that it be loaned to another library. This is a free service that can take anywhere from two days to two weeks. You bring the book back from the library and the staff mails it back to the other library.

The Pleasanton Library also circulates hotspots for $10 a day and you’re limited to a week. You get a kit to use with the adapter, cord, etc. that you signed. There are charges if you break or lose it.

Steelman also explained how public libraries are the community’s 4-1-1. People like to stop in or call, especially when they’re new in town. They ask about phone service, garbage pickup, etc.

“So people know they can do it, they can call their library to find out, or they just come in and use the computer because theirs at home hasn’t been set up yet,” Steelman said. “They need to scan something and we don’t charge for the scan at all because there’s no paper or ink involved.”

The Pleasanton Public Library is open Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Visit them today and discover them. You can also reach them at 830-569-5901.

Look in next week’s Pleasanton Express for articles on the Jourdanton, Poteet and Charlotte libraries.

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New Books and DVDs Are Coming to Milford Public Library – InkFreeNews.com https://savemynjlibrary.org/new-books-and-dvds-are-coming-to-milford-public-library-inkfreenews-com/ Sat, 19 Feb 2022 16:00:36 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/new-books-and-dvds-are-coming-to-milford-public-library-inkfreenews-com/ Adult Book Club winner Gail Weybright. Register today. Photo courtesy of Milford Public Library. Press release MILFORD – February is the perfect time to curl up with a good book or stay indoors and watch a new movie with your family. The Milford Library regularly receives new books and films. Here are some recent arrivals. […]]]>

Adult Book Club winner Gail Weybright. Register today. Photo courtesy of Milford Public Library.

Press release

MILFORD – February is the perfect time to curl up with a good book or stay indoors and watch a new movie with your family. The Milford Library regularly receives new books and films. Here are some recent arrivals.

New DVDs include: “Spencer;” “Sherlock: The Abominable Bride”; “Tom and Jerry: Cowboy Up!” ; “”The Addams Family 2;” and “Birds Like Us”.

The adult books added in February are: “Will”, by Will Smith; “Baseball 100”, by Joe Posnanski; “Flying Angels,” by Danielle Steel (large print); and “Reckless”, by Selena Montgomery.

Teen Books: “In Every Generation”, by Kendare Blake and “Anatomy of a Love Story”, by Dana Schwartz.

Children’s books: “Northwind”, by Gary Paulsen; “Cornbread and Poppy,” by Matthew Cordell; and “The Love Is Here”, by Mike Malbrough.

DVDs coming soon to Milford Public Library: “Eternals”; “Ghostbusters: Afterlife;” “King Richard;” and “House of Gucci”.

Look for adult fiction by Tracie Peterson, Janet Dailey, JA Jance, Jonathan Kellerman, James Patterson, Stephen King and Dean Koontz which will be available before the end of the month.

Book club for adults

The theme for this year’s Adult Book Club is Oceans of Possibilities. The club is open to anyone over the age of 18 and listened, you can enter a weekly draw to receive a prize. Books may be from the library or those you have purchased privately, but library staff suggest that you try reading materials that are new to you. You could earn a $25 gift card just by enjoying books, e-books, or audiobooks. Enter today for your chance to win.

The last day to submit a photo of your pet dressed as a sea creature is February 19. Any creature you find in the ocean is a possible costume for your pet. It can be a costume that you made or that you bought. All photos must be submitted by 6 p.m. on February 19 at [email protected] The winner will be chosen by library staff. The contest winner will receive a $50 gift card to PetSmart.

Virtual Winter Storytime

Sign your kids up for this story, craft and snack session. The library is offering two virtual Story Hours — one at 10:30 a.m. and the second at 1:30 p.m. Miss Trisha will read stories that go with the themes: penguins and polar bears; Winter sports and children’s author, Mo Willems. Storytime packages can be picked up the week before each storytime. You will receive an email reminder with a link to story time and a list of things you need to complete the craft in the package (scissors, glue, etc.). Call (574) 658-4312 and register your children for story time today.

Part-time job offers

Like many other businesses during COVID, the library has experienced a staff shortage. The library has two part-time openings. Both are 29 hours per week and start at $9 per hour. One evening (until 8 p.m.) per week and at least one Saturday per month are required. The first position is in the children’s department. Duties would include being a partner in story time and taking care of any delays.

The second position is for a shared clerk, which means you will work two days upstairs in the adult and teen departments and three days in the children’s department. You will learn how to catalog children’s materials and promote library services through newspaper articles and social media. Applications are being accepted now. Apply at the adult loan counter.

Printable, PDF and email version
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Whitewright Public Library takes action to eliminate fines https://savemynjlibrary.org/whitewright-public-library-takes-action-to-eliminate-fines/ Fri, 04 Feb 2022 05:36:01 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/whitewright-public-library-takes-action-to-eliminate-fines/ Whitewright, Texas — The Whitewright Public Library has strived to serve the needs of the community since its founding in 1967. Changing collections over the decades have seen books on tape and movies on VHS replaced by CDs , DVDs and digital formats. Public computers were added in the 90s and are now complemented by […]]]>

Whitewright, Texas — The Whitewright Public Library has strived to serve the needs of the community since its founding in 1967. Changing collections over the decades have seen books on tape and movies on VHS replaced by CDs , DVDs and digital formats. Public computers were added in the 90s and are now complemented by free public wifi.

Library policies have also changed over the years, the most recent being the addition of automatic renewals, which has reduced outstanding fines for many users. We are now taking the next step and completely eliminating fines as of February 1. This includes reversal of past fines. Now you can enjoy the same great library, minus the fines!

Although fines will disappear, not all fees will disappear. We will still charge for lost or damaged materials, interlibrary loans, and other services (such as copies and faxes).

Users will still need to return items if they cannot be renewed due to a waiting list or at the end of the 6 week payment period. Overdue items will lock their account against further payments, auto-renewals and digital resources. Essentially, if you don’t return items, your account and all connected accounts will be locked out and unable to access the library until they are cleared. It will also block access to the digital library and online databases.

Users have the option to receive notifications about renewals, delays and reservations via SMS or email to avoid delays. Those who have not selected the automatic notification option will still receive letters and phone calls regarding delays only. Library staff strongly recommends subscribing to the automatic notification service.

Items that are seriously overdue may be pursued through the police department as this is considered theft of City property. We don’t want to take that step, we just want our materials back, so we hope our free policy will encourage people to return them to share with their community.

We’ve seen many users over the years tell staff they’re worried about “a $100 fine” for returning an item late, so they just don’t return it. Fines have always been capped per item, but the idea of ​​having a massive fine has kept many people from returning to the library. This also means that items that are not returned may or may not be replaced by our limited funds.

Fines have accounted for less than 1% of our revenue, and we would much rather people use library materials and services than spend time trying to collect fines. However, we will always focus on returning hardware.

If you have any questions regarding your library account, please ask library staff at the office for assistance, call 903-364-2955, or email library@whitewright.com.

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Minot Public Library is reducing hours this week due to staffing shortages | News, Sports, Jobs https://savemynjlibrary.org/minot-public-library-is-reducing-hours-this-week-due-to-staffing-shortages-news-sports-jobs/ Wed, 02 Feb 2022 16:55:07 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/minot-public-library-is-reducing-hours-this-week-due-to-staffing-shortages-news-sports-jobs/ Due to a staff shortage, the Minot Public Library has adjusted its hours of service for the first few days of February. This week, the library will be open Wednesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Friday from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. The library will be closed on Saturday […]]]>

Due to a staff shortage, the Minot Public Library has adjusted its hours of service for the first few days of February.

This week, the library will be open Wednesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Friday from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. The library will be closed on Saturday and Sunday February 5 and 6.

Reduced hours also mean some programs will be canceled, including Tech. Ed. at the Parker Senior Center scheduled for 10:30 a.m. on February 3 and a 3D printing program scheduled for February 3 at 4 p.m. Take & Make programs for all ages are still scheduled as scheduled.

The Arts In The City – Sundays at the Library concert scheduled for February 8 at 6 p.m. will now take place at the Carnegie Center in downtown Minot. This concert is co-organized by the Minot Public Library and the Minot Region Arts Council. Sunday’s concert will feature Subzero Winds, a wind quartet.

Groups that have booked a meeting room will be contacted by library staff if the schedule change affects meeting room availability.

MPL staff remind customers that items can be returned to the outdoor book drop and material will be automatically replenished when possible.



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The Santa Barbara Public Library will transition to a new independent catalog system | Local News https://savemynjlibrary.org/the-santa-barbara-public-library-will-transition-to-a-new-independent-catalog-system-local-news/ Sun, 30 Jan 2022 02:52:00 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/the-santa-barbara-public-library-will-transition-to-a-new-independent-catalog-system-local-news/ The Santa Barbara Public Library announced Tuesday that it will transition from the Black Gold Library Cooperative system to a new independent catalog system in fiscal year 2023, beginning July 1. The Black Gold system, which is used to find and borrow books, has allowed the Santa Barbara Public Library to share books and materials […]]]>

The Santa Barbara Public Library announced Tuesday that it will transition from the Black Gold Library Cooperative system to a new independent catalog system in fiscal year 2023, beginning July 1.

The Black Gold system, which is used to find and borrow books, has allowed the Santa Barbara Public Library to share books and materials with other Black Gold libraries, including those in Goleta, Lompoc, Santa Maria, San Luis Obispo, Paso Robles and Saint Paula.

Since the Santa Barbara Public Library is not renewing its membership in the Black Gold Cooperative, these materials from other member libraries will no longer be available to Santa Barbara Library patrons, but Shelly Cone, public information officer for the city, said the library would continue to expand its collection.

“We have the funding to do this, so we’re confident we’ll be able to meet our customers’ needs,” Cone said.

According to a statement from the City of Santa Barbara, the change will improve statistical reporting, allowing library staff to customize their collection to better meet community interests and needs, as the current catalog system does not distinction between books borrowed by local customers and those lent to other libraries.

“A change was necessary in order to provide the breadth of services we wanted to offer our customers, and our vision was at odds with the direction other Black Gold member libraries wanted to take,” said the library manager, Jessica Cadiente, in the press release.

Cone said there will be no loss of service for local library users and the most, if not the only, change users will notice is the lack of interlibrary loan.

“There are a lot of benefits to this – one of the biggest for us is the ability to be more inclusive with our collections,” Cone said. “It will provide a better experience for our unique community.”

In addition to being able to customize the library’s collection, the change will help the Santa Barbara Public Library better accommodate its Spanish-speaking users and provide a more convenient experience for those patrons, Cone added.

“We are really excited about these changes. The Santa Barbara Public Library has been a strong advocate for these changes,” Cone said. “The change really means that other libraries won’t have access to our physical books and our customers won’t be able to access books from other libraries, but the service for our customers will only get better because we’ll invest that which we have paid to Black Gold in our libraries and collections.

Cone also confirmed that Santa Barbara Public Library customers will still have access to Hoopla, Overdrive and other digital programs that allow users to borrow eBooks, audiobooks and other digital media.

“Not renewing Black Gold membership is in the best interests of the Santa Barbara Public Library in terms of cost and operational efficiency,” the library’s website states. “Costs will increase by at least $78,000 due to the removal of the SLO library from the co-op. [if the Santa Barbara Public Library stays in the Black Gold Cooperative] … After San Luis Obispo, the Santa Barbara Public Library has the highest collection budget and purchases the most new printed materials each year.

To ease the transition, the library suspended borrowing materials from other member libraries last week.

The city of Goleta sent out a statement on Friday saying that its library, along with libraries in the Santa Ynez Valley, will remain partners of the Black Gold Cooperative.

With the Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo libraries leaving the system, changes to the remaining Black Gold member libraries include that patrons can no longer reserve items or renew items owned by the Santa Barbara or San Luis Obispo libraries, therefore the Goleta Valley Library asks patrons to return these items before their due date.

After June 30, items borrowed from the Santa Barbara or San Luis Obispo libraries cannot be returned to Goleta or Santa Ynez Valley branches.

The Goleta Valley Library also announced on Friday that on April 25, it will transition its circulation system to Koha, an open-source software. The Goleta Library will also have an increased book budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1.

– Noozhawk editor Serena Guentz can be reached at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). Follow Noozhawk on Twitter: @noozhawk, @NoozhawkNews and @NoozhawkBiz. Connect with Noozhawk on Facebook.

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“Help us”: the insoluble dilemma of the National Library https://savemynjlibrary.org/help-us-the-insoluble-dilemma-of-the-national-library/ Fri, 28 Jan 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/help-us-the-insoluble-dilemma-of-the-national-library/ Rachel Esson is out of ideas. “We tried book fairs. We tried to donate. After plans to ship 600,000 rarely used books overseas were halted following months of book sector setbacks, the National Librarian issued an appeal to save books from the pulping machine: “We really don’t want to recycle them…help us.” Esson won’t hesitate […]]]>

Rachel Esson is out of ideas. “We tried book fairs. We tried to donate.

After plans to ship 600,000 rarely used books overseas were halted following months of book sector setbacks, the National Librarian issued an appeal to save books from the pulping machine: “We really don’t want to recycle them…help us.”

Esson won’t hesitate to believe that the books in the collection published overseas will be officially removed from the library – she just doesn’t know what to do with them after that.

It’s one of the many challenges facing Esson, who took office exactly a year ago, taking over from Bill Macnaught. She says 2022 marks the start of an exciting new chapter for the National Library.

National Librarian Rachel Esson says the job is and isn't what she thought it would be.

Jericho Rock-Archer / Stuff

National Librarian Rachel Esson says the job is and isn’t what she thought it would be.

READ MORE:
* Documenting the pandemic – how Archives NZ and the National Library are monitoring
* Authors unite in literary protest against National Library’s Internet Archive deal
* National Library signs ‘historic’ deal to donate 600,000 books to online archives
* Call for suspension of culling of National Library books during review

It is continuing the New Zealand Libraries Partnership Program after the government allocated $58.8 million to help the country’s library ecosystem recover from the effects of Covid-19.

This year it will support Archives New Zealand with a major new building, which will physically link the cultural repository to the library and create a heritage campus in Pōneke.

Esson hopes the work done by the National Library will help break stereotypes about libraries.

JERICHO ROCK-ARCHER/Stuff

Esson hopes the work done by the National Library will help break stereotypes about libraries.

It will continue to work with and alongside iwi and Maori, and is taking steps to intensify this commitment with the appointment of Ruki Tobin, the library’s first kaihautū (Maori chief) in over a decade.

The archives named their own kaihautū, Anahera Morehu. Diversity gaps have been addressed within the sector and among library staff, Esson says.

Papers Past, which digitizes historical documents, turns 21 this year. Collecting digital material will remain a priority, but how best to get a representative slice of Aotearoa at any given time remains a challenge. And it must keep up with ever-changing methods of preserving content.

Then there is Covid-19, which continues to keep the library on edge. The library will continue to support community, school and kura, public and special libraries, assuming an industry leadership role, as Te Papa does for museums nationwide.

Work to help Aotearoa grow a nation of readers – including through inaugural Reading Ambassador Ben Brown – continues.

The functioning of libraries is changing. The use of e-books and online books has exploded. Libraries are offering more services than ever before, including tutorials for shopping online during lockdown and helping people register for vaccine passes.

Esson says she won't be able to please everyone with the collection's 600,000 books published overseas.

Jericho Rock-Archer / Stuff

Esson says she won’t be able to please everyone with the collection’s 600,000 books published overseas.

The most important thing about public libraries is that they are one of the last spaces where people don’t have to buy anything to be there, Esson says. This concept is often referred to as a “third space”, different from home and work. With denser housing, it will be more important for people to have those spaces, she says.

Esson, whose first job at the library was as a photo archive assistant at the Alexander Turnbull Library in the mid-1980s, says she is a “librarian at heart.”

Is the role of National Librarian what she thought it would be?

Yes, from the perspective of engaging with stakeholders and promoting library mahi, and planning for the future. Not because of the unique challenges and controversies that come with it – namely what to do with the 600,000 books in the collection published overseas.

Esson says she is establishing a dialogue with stakeholders after taking a break from the ongoing saga late last year.

Esson stands in front of a work by Alexander Turnbull - his first library work was in the photographic archive of the Alexander Turnbull Library in the mid-1980s.

Jericho Rock-Archer / Stuff

Esson stands in front of a work by Alexander Turnbull – his first library work was in the photographic archive of the Alexander Turnbull Library in the mid-1980s.

She plans to poll the industry on their key concerns and ideas, after the library encountered major resistance to plans to donate the books to the offshore Internet Archive, which is embroiled in a copyright lawsuit.

Esson will not reconsider keeping rarely used overseas books, which will make room for a larger Maori and Peaceful collection. But sending them to the recycling bin is the library’s “absolute last resort.”

“People care so passionately about it. But the world has moved on and we don’t need to keep them,” she says. “It’s not good for New Zealand, and for us, to keep them. And they’re not being used. And they’re available elsewhere. All these arguments. We’ll find a way through, but I’m not sure we can please everyone.

Esson says the “unnecessary misinformation” escalated before Dec. 1, when the library gave authors and publishers the option to opt out of the donation if their book made the shortlist.

The library’s decision to get rid of the books is linked to its work on diversity and inclusion for all New Zealanders, she says.

Esson says she is a librarian

JERICHO ROCK-ARCHER/Stuff

Esson says she is a librarian “at heart.”

“There are voices that are very loud – a particular sector that is very well served. They perceive any change as a threat to them. But it’s like in fact everything is set up for you.

After Partnership Program funding ends in June, the library will begin research that will attempt to measure the impact of funding on people – for example, how many more children learned to read – compared to the number of books she paid.

Libraries often fail to provide evidence and data about their value, which contributes to taking them for granted and stereotyping library work, Esson says. It also causes libraries to underestimate their own impact.

“People say they want to be a journalist or a lawyer or a doctor,” she says. “Have you ever heard someone say, ‘I want to be a librarian’? We have this responsibility towards future generations. It’s not about [us]this is Aotearoa.

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Garrett Public Library News | Garrett Clipper https://savemynjlibrary.org/garrett-public-library-news-garrett-clipper/ Tue, 18 Jan 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/garrett-public-library-news-garrett-clipper/ book sale The library invites users to browse the selection during its current book sale. A variety of books, music CDs, DVDs and books on CD are available. All prizes are by donation only. Home service The Garrett Public Library offers door-to-door service for cardholders. If you are a Garrett resident and do not have […]]]>

book sale

The library invites users to browse the selection during its current book sale.

A variety of books, music CDs, DVDs and books on CD are available.

All prizes are by donation only.

Home service

The Garrett Public Library offers door-to-door service for cardholders.

If you are a Garrett resident and do not have a library card, the staff will be happy to issue you one.

Home service is available for those who are temporarily or permanently confined to their homes.

For more information, call 357-5485.

Evening book club

The evening book club will meet at 6:30 p.m. tonight, January 18.

Visitors are invited to read about their favorite author and share with the group why they might like him.

ceramic tile

The library will be offering a ceramic tile class at 10 a.m. Saturday.

All supplies will be provided free of charge. Advance registration is required.

Participants will design their own ceramic tile using Sharpie markers and rubbing alcohol.

Valentine’s plate

The library will be offering a Valentine’s Day Love Plate Class at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, February 1.

All supplies will be provided free of charge. Advance registration is required at the upstairs loan counter.

Participants will create their plaques using wood laminate, paint and glue.

Technical Tuesdays

Bring your technical questions to the computer area on the library floor at 10 a.m. every Tuesday. Staff will help find answers to questions.

Handicraft program

Patrons are invited to the library at 10 a.m. on Saturday, January 22. Design your own ceramic tile using Sharpie markers and rubbing alcohol. All supplies will be provided free of charge. Advance registration is required.

Take and do

A new project will be announced each month, with free DIY kits available while supplies last.

January’s craft is a penguin bottle cap magnet.

Teen bedroom

The Teen Room (Herzer Hall) will have after-school activities at 3:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday.

Baby story time

Baby Storytime will take place at 11 a.m. every Monday.

Story time for toddlers

Toddler story time will be at 1:00 p.m. every Thursday.

Kids club

The kids’ club offers opportunities to experiment with science, explore arts and crafts, have fun with food, and play with cool activities.

Join the library every Wednesday from 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. No registration is required. All supplies are provided.

Early Learning Kits

These kits are free educational activities — four crafts in each kit.

The learning kits change every month. These can be picked up at the library while supplies last.

Tall Storybook Kits

Need a variety of formats to entertain your kids? Get a Tall Tales Book Kit. Each kit includes three books, one movie, one music CD, one coloring page/activity page. Choose a theme: dinosaurs, animals, bedtime, pirates, superheroes or cats.

Book kits are limited to one per customer.

Viewing Garrett’s History

A historic Garrett exhibit, “Tales as Old as Time: Garrett through the Ages,” is at the library until late summer in the South Corridor display cases. The exhibit features photos and items from the Garrett community, some dating back to the 1800s.

Library Guidelines

Masks are recommended but not mandatory for library staff and users. The library will continue to provide masks to visitors who need them.

Library fines, fees explained

Overdue fines will no longer accumulate on patron accounts.

Administration fees for processing lost or damaged items will no longer be charged. Customers, however, are still responsible for lost or damaged items and replacement costs.

Video games available

The Garrett Public Library has a video game collection that is now available for public circulation.

Games for PlayStation 4, XBox One and Nintendo Switch will be offered.

The collection includes games for all audiences, from ESRB rating E (for everyone) to M (for adult).

Customers can view five games at a time for periods of one week.

Small free library

Thanks to a generous donation from Church at Garrett, the Garrett Public Library has a small free library.

The small free library is located near the west entrance. No library card is required. Visitors can take away any books that interest them.

Gently used books can be donated depending on space availability.

Garrett Public Library staff will periodically refresh and restock the small free library.

Please note that this is not the drop box for returning library materials. The library drop box is located further south in the parking lot and is silver.

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Documenting the pandemic – how the NZ Archives and the National Library are keeping tabs https://savemynjlibrary.org/documenting-the-pandemic-how-the-nz-archives-and-the-national-library-are-keeping-tabs/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/documenting-the-pandemic-how-the-nz-archives-and-the-national-library-are-keeping-tabs/ The National Library – the one that houses Te Tiriti o Waitangi – collect memes. For millennia, humans have documented their time in unusual and humorous ways that people before or after did not understand. During the Spanish Flu pandemic of 1918, people shared cartoons and jokes that shed light on a terrible situation, many […]]]>


The National Library – the one that houses Te Tiriti o Waitangi collect memes.

For millennia, humans have documented their time in unusual and humorous ways that people before or after did not understand.

During the Spanish Flu pandemic of 1918, people shared cartoons and jokes that shed light on a terrible situation, many of which now make no sense.

Things are no different in the 21st century, but today technology is revolutionizing the way we communicate.

READ MORE:
* Forgotten by the cultural sector, the queer communities of Aotearoa are documenting themselves
* The National Library signs a “historic” agreement to donate 600,000 books to the online archives
* Treaty bite marks underscore the importance of our national archives

So, as part of their work to document the Covid-19 pandemic, Alexander Turnbull library staff keep an eye out for popular memes.

Associate Chief Librarian Jessica Moran said staff also kept a recording of the IMDB page of the daily Covid-19 press conference and accompanying comments.

“Once we realized there was this IMDB, with all the comments, we collected it through our web archiving program, and stuff like that, you know, we have a fleeting collection of paper. very rich – going back 150, 200 years.

“And they [memes] only makes sense if you are in this community and this world and get all the references and jokes about the jokes. So part of that was a fun thing to collect, it gives us a little bit of a breathing space, but also, it gives you a bit of that context of the way people were talking.

Jessica Moran, Head of Digital Collections Services at the National Library.

Monique Ford / Stuff

Jessica Moran, Head of Digital Collections Services at the National Library.

The library also collects all written news, digital and physical copies, as well as any books written in New Zealand.

People donate personal journals – again, physical books or online journals such as daily videos on Facebook, for example – photos, letters, anything related to their experience with the pandemic.

Te Pouhuaki National Librarian Rachel Esson said Archives New Zealand documents official ministry records, but the National Library is looking beyond that.

“Our focus is a lot more on the company, and in the reaction of people, and in trying to be representative by gathering all of these different voices and perspectives,” Esson said.

“I’ve always loved a story that a colleague who worked at the Archives told when there was a lot of work going on with the WWI commemorations.

“He said the archives contained what officers thought of soldiers, so this official record, and the library contained what soldiers thought of officers, which was much more interesting from my point of view. Wasn’t it that sanitized view? “

Diseases have come before, like swine or bird flu, and have not caused a lasting global impact like the Covid-19 pandemic.

Library staff said the most recent event of such significance is likely World War II, when the entire world was essentially shut down for a period.

Abi Beatson said photos showing Wellington's empty streets showed the impact of the pandemic.

Ross Giblin / Stuff

Abi Beatson said photos showing Wellington’s empty streets showed the impact of the pandemic.

The library’s digital archivist, Abi Beatson, said an item from the Alexander Turnbull collection is now stuck in his mind.

“This is a photograph of the streets of Wellington which are completely empty during the level four lockdown. This was donated by a photographer, ”Beatson said.

“I think there is one element that really speaks to the enormity of the impact of this pandemic, of the fact that it has managed to clear our streets of the hustle and bustle of daily activity. It’s objects like that that really help tell the significance of this event.

Down the road from the Alexander Turnbull Library is the New Zealand Archives base.

It plays a key role in documenting the government’s response to major events, but documents, videos and other material recorded by a government agency are not returned to the Archives until 25 years after the fact.

During a major event, the Archives conducts audits and advises agencies on what information they should store and make sure they are doing what they are told.

Vernon Wybrow, director of the Disposal and Acquisition team at the Archives, said his team makes sure the right information is collected and the Archives has the technology to accept the information.

“The recordings we get are about a generation after they’re created, basically,” Wybrow said. “Right now the records we’re getting are a hybrid mix of paper and digital, so that’s what was created 25 years ago, that’s what we’re dealing with now.

Cartoons and gifs created by Toby Morris and Siouxsie Wiles are part of the collection of the National Library.

Toby Morris; Siouxsie Wiles / Supplied

Cartoons and gifs created by Toby Morris and Siouxsie Wiles are part of the collection of the National Library.

“But if we take what’s going on now and how these recordings are being created now, it’s pretty much digital. And in 25 years, that’s the kind of thing we’ll be dealing with.

Government record keeping director Antony Moss said the Archives had consulted with government agencies on their new duties and what should be archived.

For example, he said the managed system of isolation and quarantine is brand new and something that has never been seen before, so the Archives are making sure that the Department of Business, Innovation and ‘Emploi documents everything he owes around the MIQ.

They also gave advice on things like keeping records in government buildings or the upcoming vaccine pass system.

“The rules that existed before Covid pretty much apply,” Moss said. “In today’s environment, they still make sense. But when there are areas of confusion, we offer advice to agencies. “

One area of ​​confusion has been Zoom meetings, with agencies debating whether to keep all of the recorded video of a meeting, or just the minutes as before.

Wybrow said that in some situations the minutes and a summary are sufficient, but for larger or meaningful meetings they expect agencies to keep and archive the full video.

He said another area of ​​interest is algorithms.

Groceries waiting in a queue outside Pak N Save in Royal Oak.

DAVID WHITE / STUFF

Groceries waiting in a queue outside Pak N Save in Royal Oak.

“One of the challenges we’ll face is how to make sure that an algorithm is represented accurately so that you have the context in which a decision was made,” Wybrow said.

“If you allow an algorithm to make the decisions for you, at least you need to know what the basis of the algorithm is to make that decision. “

They said agencies need to be able to explain how their algorithms work and keep that data for later review.

The Archives and the National Library also have Treaty of Waitangi obligations, but they are broader in scope for the Archives.

For example, if a treaty claim were made regarding government decision making during the pandemic and the impact of those decisions on Maori, the Archives would play a key role in providing evidence to the Crown or Maori.

Wybrow said the treaty is one of the three key principles of information retention decisions.

As for memes, unless they were used for official government business, they are unlikely to be kept in the National Archives.


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