national library – Save My NJ Library http://savemynjlibrary.org/ Sun, 20 Mar 2022 04:15:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://savemynjlibrary.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.png national library – Save My NJ Library http://savemynjlibrary.org/ 32 32 New Chair and Vice-Chair of the National Library of Wales appointed https://savemynjlibrary.org/new-chair-and-vice-chair-of-the-national-library-of-wales-appointed/ Fri, 18 Mar 2022 11:04:39 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/new-chair-and-vice-chair-of-the-national-library-of-wales-appointed/ Ashok Ahir has been named the new president. Mr. Ahir has been acting president of the National Library since September 2021. Andrew Evans has been named the new Vice President. Mr. Evans is a consultant specializing in fundraising and business development for start-ups, charities and non-profit organizations, particularly in the cultural sector. The Library Chair […]]]>

Ashok Ahir has been named the new president. Mr. Ahir has been acting president of the National Library since September 2021.

Andrew Evans has been named the new Vice President. Mr. Evans is a consultant specializing in fundraising and business development for start-ups, charities and non-profit organizations, particularly in the cultural sector.

The Library Chair is accountable to the Welsh Government’s Deputy Minister for Arts and Sport for the performance of the Library and the delivery of strategic priorities.

Deputy Arts and Sport Minister Dawn Bowden said:

“I am delighted that Ashok has been appointed to this senior, strategic and influential role in the cultural sector in Wales. He will play a crucial role in ensuring that the Library continues to deliver the findings of the custom review and implement the Library’s five-year strategic plan. He will be an effective ambassador for the Library, drawing on his experience as interim president.

“It is also a great pleasure to appoint Andrew as Vice President. He will be a passionate advocate for the Library and will bring new skills and knowledge to the Board. His fundraising expertise will add great value to the Library.

Ashok Ahir said:

“The National Library of Wales has an ambitious work program to achieve the goals of a new five-year strategy. I look forward to leading a great group of administrators at a time of tremendous opportunity. The library is not only the home of the nation’s memory, it also has an important role to play as we examine, reimagine and celebrate the diversity of the Welsh experience.

Andrew Evans said:

“I am delighted to have been offered the opportunity to serve as Vice President of one of Wales’ great cultural institutions. I look forward to working with the Library’s dedicated staff as we seek to care for the Library’s unparalleled collection; one of the great treasures of Welsh heritage and culture. The next few years offer great opportunities for the Library to increase the number and diversity of visitors and readers and I am delighted to be part of this journey.

Pedr ap Llwyd, Chief Executive and Librarian of the National Library of Wales, said:

“I welcome Ashok’s appointment as President and am already very grateful to him for his leadership and support as Acting President over the past six months. This is an excellent appointment and the Library will benefit immensely from this appointment.

“We also welcome Andrew as Vice-President and look forward to working with him: we know him as a very capable individual with varied skills, competencies and experience in many areas from which the Library will certainly benefit. .

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Not just to read, but to live: the bold transformation of the National Library https://savemynjlibrary.org/not-just-to-read-but-to-live-the-bold-transformation-of-the-national-library/ Mon, 14 Mar 2022 05:25:27 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/not-just-to-read-but-to-live-the-bold-transformation-of-the-national-library/ A wall projection for Hwang Sun-won’s short story “The Cloudburst” (1952) (NLK) The National Library of Korea, located in Seocho-gu, southern Seoul, on Monday announced the opening of an immersive literary content room experience, Jisikui Gil, which means “Path to Knowledge.” This follows last year’s Ministry of Culture initiative project Shilgam Seojae, which successfully transformed […]]]>

A wall projection for Hwang Sun-won’s short story “The Cloudburst” (1952) (NLK)

The National Library of Korea, located in Seocho-gu, southern Seoul, on Monday announced the opening of an immersive literary content room experience, Jisikui Gil, which means “Path to Knowledge.”

This follows last year’s Ministry of Culture initiative project Shilgam Seojae, which successfully transformed some of South Korea’s ancient writings and archived documents stored in the library into interactive content using multidimensional technologies. This year’s project focuses on modern and contemporary Korean literature.

The Jisikui Gil consists of two main sections: Writer’s Notes and Smart Lounge.

The first section introduces four of the most beloved contemporary Korean literary classics chosen by readers over time. Kim So-wol’s poem, “Azaleas” (1925), Yun Dong-ju’s poem, “Night of Counting the Stars” (1941), Lee Hyo-seok’s short story “When Buckwheat Flowers Bloom” (1936) and Hwang Sun- won’s short story “The Cloudburst” (1952).

Bringing the settings and themes of each work into the backdrop, projections of relevant text, music and digital paintings traverse the wall display. The whole experience in the room makes visitors feel like they are inside memorable scenes from the writers’ works.

A wall projection of Kim So-wol's poem,

A wall projection of Kim So-wol’s poem, “Azaleas” (1925) (NLK)

The Smart Lounge, with AI-based literary content (NLK)

The Smart Lounge, with AI-based literary content (NLK)

The Smart Lounge offers visitors content based on artificial intelligence. It organizes and recommends books based on visitors’ interests. Personalized choices are given by answering a series of questions in a kiosk, such as her favorite season or color. Visitors can also preview the recommended book before diving in, as the show guides them through some of the book’s key features.

“As soon as visitors enter the Jisikui Gil, they will forget that they are in a library,” the library’s project team coordinator told the Korea Herald on Monday. “We hope that such projects can be an opportunity for the library to be recognized as a complex cultural center, breaking with common perceptions of it as a silent and ossified conventional library. Literature will continue to be updated in the first section after most visitors view the content, the coordinator added.

Meanwhile, other cultural events at the library include a special exhibition on Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania called “The Baltic Way”, which runs until April 10. There are also regular screenings of independent national films which open every second and fourth Thursday of the month. at 2 p.m. until December.

For visits to the Immersive Content Rooms and other cultural events organized by the library, reservations are required on the National Library of Korea website, www.nl.go.kr.

By Kim Hae-yeon (hykim@heraldcorp.com)

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Iranian Jews bought tomb of Queen Esther and Mordechai, National Library of Israel reveals https://savemynjlibrary.org/iranian-jews-bought-tomb-of-queen-esther-and-mordechai-national-library-of-israel-reveals/ Sun, 13 Mar 2022 12:12:42 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/iranian-jews-bought-tomb-of-queen-esther-and-mordechai-national-library-of-israel-reveals/ (March 13, 2022 / Israel Hayom) Ahead of the Purim holiday, the National Library of Israel has revealed an exchange of historic letters proving that Iranian Jews purchased the Tomb of Esther and Mordechai in the Iranian city of Hamadan in 1971. The purchase marked 2,500 years to the edict of the Persian king Cyrus […]]]>

Ahead of the Purim holiday, the National Library of Israel has revealed an exchange of historic letters proving that Iranian Jews purchased the Tomb of Esther and Mordechai in the Iranian city of Hamadan in 1971. The purchase marked 2,500 years to the edict of the Persian king Cyrus the Great authorizing the Babylonians to worship the god of their choice.

The letters reveal negotiations between Jewish representatives in the country and officials of Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi’s government regarding the purchase of the land in which, according to tradition, Mordechai and Esther, whose story is read in the Book of Esther on Purim, are buried. The extraordinary exchange was preserved by the organization ORT, kept in the central archives of the Central Zionist Archives of the National Library.

There is no mention of their burial place in Jewish texts, but according to several local traditions dating back to the Middle Ages, both are buried in Hamadan. According to one tradition, after the death of King Ahasuerus, Haman’s followers, who attempted to have all the Jews in the kingdom killed, sought revenge, prompting Esther and Mordechai to flee to Hamadan.

The earliest evidence of the mausoleum’s connections to Jewish figures was provided by the 12th-century medieval Jewish traveler Benjamin of Tudela, who estimated that Hamadan had around 50,000 Jewish residents and described the tomb as being located in front of the synagogue.

According to Dr. Samuel Thrope, curator of the Middle East and Islam collection at the National Library, the letters testify to the fact that the last shah of Iran considered himself the successor of Cyrus and sought to present this image to the Jews. from his country. The 2,500th anniversary of Cyrus’ edict was precisely the event the shah was looking for, Thrope said.

In a 1968 letter to the representative of Iran’s Jewish community in parliament, Lotfollah Hay, the director general of Iran’s department of archeology and public education, Abdolali Pourmand, specified that the country’s education ministry would help the community Jew from Iran to purchase the tomb and surrounding land from its then owner, Banque Bazargani. The acquisition would be paid for by selling tickets to enter the tomb, they explained.

In their exchange, the regime’s sense of urgency is apparent. Pourmand specifically asks the Jewish community for their response to the proposed initiative because the government has yet to receive a response on the matter.

According to the letters, the land was purchased on January 18, 1970, after which ownership of the land was transferred to the local Jewish community.

Thrope explained, “This story sheds a unique light on the Jewish community’s ties to Iranian authorities over the years and on Cyrus’ special status, both among Jews and Persian audiences.

This article first appeared in Israel Hayom.

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system to celebrate National Library Week | County life https://savemynjlibrary.org/system-to-celebrate-national-library-week-county-life/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/system-to-celebrate-national-library-week-county-life/ National Library Week 2022 will take place from April 3-9. This is a time to reflect on the importance of libraries and library workers in communities across our country, and the importance of supporting and defending libraries. The Halifax County and South Boston Public Library System will celebrate National Library Week with two programs at […]]]>

National Library Week 2022 will take place from April 3-9. This is a time to reflect on the importance of libraries and library workers in communities across our country, and the importance of supporting and defending libraries.

The Halifax County and South Boston Public Library System will celebrate National Library Week with two programs at the South Boston Public Library. The library hasn’t held any indoor programming since the pandemic began in 2020, so the return of indoor programming to libraries will be another reason to celebrate.

On Tuesday, April 5, from 5 to 8 p.m., the South Boston Public Library will host a reading of banned books. Copies of several different books that have been challenged or banned will be available for people to read. Everyone in attendance will receive a “Reading Forbidden Books” sticker. Refreshments will be available from 5 p.m.

On Saturday, April 9 at 11 a.m., author Tierra Bethel will discuss her book, “Let There Be Sound,” in the upstairs meeting room of the South Boston Public Library.

A resident of North Carolina, Bethel earned her undergraduate degree from Virginia Tech and her MBA from Liberty University. Having experienced hearing loss growing up, her book helps individuals understand hearing loss and overcome the misconceptions that surround the condition. Refreshments will be served during this program.

Celebrate National Library Week 2022 with the Halifax County and South Boston Public Library System.

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Australian performing arts take center stage at the National Library https://savemynjlibrary.org/australian-performing-arts-take-center-stage-at-the-national-library/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 18:50:20 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/australian-performing-arts-take-center-stage-at-the-national-library/ The National Library of Australia’s latest exhibition, On the scene, is a celebration of Australia’s love of the performing arts. It showcases cultural treasures, dynamic characters and defining moments in the history of Australian performing arts from the 1790s to the present day. Featuring over 180 objects, this free exhibition brings together highlights from the […]]]>

The National Library of Australia’s latest exhibition, On the scene, is a celebration of Australia’s love of the performing arts.

It showcases cultural treasures, dynamic characters and defining moments in the history of Australian performing arts from the 1790s to the present day.

Featuring over 180 objects, this free exhibition brings together highlights from the National Library’s extensive performing arts collections.

On the scene curator, Dr Susannah Helman, said Canberra Weekly the National Library’s extensive performing arts collections reflect “how much Australians love the performing arts”.

“Australians have enjoyed going to performing arts of all kinds for decades and centuries,” she said.

“As a huge fan of live performances of all kinds, I thought I knew the history of Australian performing arts, but our collections opened my eyes to the cultural life that Australians of the past might have known,” she said.

Beginning work on the exhibit “a few years ago,” the process has seen Helman comprehensively examine the National Library’s performing arts collection.

It was a highly collaborative project that involved talking to colleagues, reading and doing extensive research, and a lot of research: “opening drawers and going with the happy kind of thing by accident; You never know what you might find.”

“It’s a bit overwhelming because we have such a rich collection, and it’s hard to make decisions because you can only fit so many items in a space,” she said.

“It’s always a balance, it’s a puzzle. It’s just a matter of selecting some of the interesting and compelling stories, pulling them out of the piles, and putting them together into a narrative.

“It’s been great fun exploring our collections and bringing them out.”

Having started working on the exhibition before the COVID-19 pandemic, On the scene is particularly timely and relevant given the devastating effects pandemic restrictions have had on the performing arts sector in Australia.

“It’s clear from the collections that Australians have a long love of the performing arts, and I think we also have a rich history to look back on and look forward to better days ahead,” Helman said.

The exhibit is presented chronologically, beginning with Australia’s oldest document printed in the country, a poster for a convict-directed production at a Sydney theater in 1796.

The whole of the 20th century is well represented, with rooms documenting the turn of the century, WWII, retro 1970s style and design, as well as more contemporary photography and posters from Bangarra, AC/DC, Big Day Out, and The Hilltop Hoods.

Helman said On the scene brings together a wide range of stories, making a point of balancing elements of great importance with others where there is much more to it than meets the eye.

“Some objects may look a bit simple at first, but when you examine them, you can find gold,” she said.

“They show very interesting details of the history of the performing arts in Australia, and in particular the passion and activity that has gone on in this area.”

Props like scale models used by Jørn Utzon when designing the Sydney Opera House sit alongside printed salary books full of notations and a deed register that was shown at Sydney’s Tivoli Theater in 1914.

“It’s full of richness, because it basically shows you all the performers,” Helman said, “you’ve got a comedian, you’ve got dancers, acrobats, gymnasts, contortionists.

“I find it really evocative to see this detail.”

On Stage: Spotlight on Our Performing Arts is open at the National Library of Australia until Sunday, August 7; nla.gov.au

On the scene is presented chronologically, with a poster from the 1790s through to contemporary photographs and posters of Bangarra, the Big Day Out festival and The Hilltop Hoods.

Get all the latest Canberra news, sport, entertainment, lifestyle, competitions and more straight to your inbox with the Canberra Weekly Daily newsletter. register here.

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A look at the history of the performing arts at the National Library of Australia’s On Stage exhibition | Canberra time https://savemynjlibrary.org/a-look-at-the-history-of-the-performing-arts-at-the-national-library-of-australias-on-stage-exhibition-canberra-time/ Sun, 06 Mar 2022 18:30:00 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/a-look-at-the-history-of-the-performing-arts-at-the-national-library-of-australias-on-stage-exhibition-canberra-time/ news, latest news, On Stage: Spotlight On Our Performing Arts, national library of australia I don’t remember the first time I went on stage. It would have been when I was about three years old and I can almost guarantee it was a performance made for Bananas in Pajamas – because that’s what all the […]]]>

news, latest news, On Stage: Spotlight On Our Performing Arts, national library of australia

I don’t remember the first time I went on stage. It would have been when I was about three years old and I can almost guarantee it was a performance made for Bananas in Pajamas – because that’s what all the “Tiny Tots” dancers did in dance school where I went. But that cute (at best) stage entrance began a 15-year love affair with the stage. And it really was a love story. My mom was supportive, but she was never the stereotypical dance mom pushing me into the spotlight. And while performing was in my blood – passed down from my grandmother who performed professionally – it was never a “must-do”. Every term I had the option to quit – usually around the same time my parents were seeing how much school was going to cost them for another 10 weeks. But the answer was always, “Why don’t I keep dancing?” READ MORE: It was definitely a part of who I was, and something like that doesn’t leave you. There’s always a certain sense of belonging when I’m on or around the stage, whether it’s dance, theatre, comedy or live music. And not to mention, you tend to have a better understanding of what it takes to be on stage and perform in front of a crowd, at all levels. The theater is my happy place. And like many others, I don’t think I fully understood this until it was taken down. And it’s this collective realization that makes this a fitting time for the National Library of Australia’s latest exhibition. On Stage: Spotlight On Our Performing Arts showcases cultural treasures, dynamic characters and defining moments in the history of Australian performing arts from the 1790s to today. It is a poignant reminder of the crucial role the performing arts industry has played in Australian cultural life. “The library’s performing arts collections show how much Australians love live performance,” said Susannah Helman, curator and curator of the library of rare books and music. “As a huge fan of live performances of all kinds, I thought I knew the history of the performing arts in Australia, but our collections opened my eyes to the cultural life Australians of the past might have known.” The library’s performing arts collections are overwhelming in scope and only a selection can be viewed. In the exhibition I tried to represent key moments, productions and performers from our history, to give context to today’s performing arts scene. “Because it’s really a stage, even a spectrum, of the performing arts. And I think people forget about that sometimes. The performing arts aren’t just about ballet recitals and theater productions. Whether it’s AC/DC rocking a crowd of fans or 1950s folk band The Bushwalkers playing at a community event, it’s worked its way into the social fabric more than anyone thought. And perhaps with this new awareness, it’s a good time to see how far Australian performing arts have come.Our journalists work hard to bring local, up-to-date news to the community. This is how you can continue to access our trusted content:

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The On Stage exhibition at the National Library shows how Australian theater has ‘kept the lights on’ throughout history https://savemynjlibrary.org/the-on-stage-exhibition-at-the-national-library-shows-how-australian-theater-has-kept-the-lights-on-throughout-history/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 20:42:56 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/the-on-stage-exhibition-at-the-national-library-shows-how-australian-theater-has-kept-the-lights-on-throughout-history/ In early 2020, as darkness and uncertainty hung over the Australian performing arts scene, Ange Sullivan lit a single light globe on the stage of the Joan Sutherland Theater at the Sydney Opera House. In the years since, the photograph of Ms Sullivan, the theater’s lighting manager, has become a beacon of hope for the […]]]>

In early 2020, as darkness and uncertainty hung over the Australian performing arts scene, Ange Sullivan lit a single light globe on the stage of the Joan Sutherland Theater at the Sydney Opera House.

In the years since, the photograph of Ms Sullivan, the theater’s lighting manager, has become a beacon of hope for the performing arts industry and has now been exhibited at the National Library of Australia in as the centerpiece of a new collection of works.

“A phantom light is an electric light left energized on the stage of an unoccupied theater that would otherwise be completely dark,” said National Library Director-General Marie-Louise Ayres.

Livelihoods of performers are “taken away”

The opening of the collection at the National Library comes as live entertainment returns to Australian stages.(ABC News: Emma Thompson)

Ms Ayres said that when the lights started to come on on stages across the country and Australians returned to their places in the audience, the opening of the library’s new exhibition, called On Stage, seemed appropriate.

Ms Ayres reflected on the past two years and said she had missed going to see stage performances and the excitement of waiting for the curtains to open.

But she wondered what it must have been like for Australian artists not being able to engage with audiences.

But the exhibition, with more than 180 pieces on display, also symbolizes the story of the resilience of Australian theatre, which has survived world wars, cultural shifts and previous pandemics.

Australia’s oldest printed document advertising a ‘rather naughty show’

A worn poster from 1796.
This worn poster for a 1796 production of “Jane Shore” is believed to be the oldest piece printed in Australia.(ABC News: Ross Nerdal)

One of the exhibits in the library is a poster for Jane Shore, which dates back to 1796.

He announced a theatrical performance to be held in Sydney; a tragedy about the famous mistress of medieval English king Edward IV.

The playbill is believed to be the oldest printed document in Australia.

Ms Ayres said it was a “revelation for Australia” when the document “appeared in an album at Library and Archives Canada in 2007”.

“I think Australians had seen themselves, in those early years of the penal colony, as everything about law and order,” she said.

Two images of performers in frames on a gallery wall.
The On Stage collection is comprised of performing arts memorabilia including posters, pictures, albums and letters.(ABC News: Emma Thompson)

Exhibition curator Susannah Helman said visitors to the library can expect to peek behind the curtain, with many exhibits from the personal archives of performers, dancers and composers .

“We are very happy that people are seeing one of the richest aspects of the library’s collection.”

The exhibition is on view at the National Library of Australia from today until the beginning of August.

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ON STAGE opens at the National Library of Australia https://savemynjlibrary.org/on-stage-opens-at-the-national-library-of-australia/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 10:55:39 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/on-stage-opens-at-the-national-library-of-australia/ The National Library will celebrate the performing arts in a major new exhibition opening to the public on March 4. On Stage celebrates Australia’s love of the performing arts. The exhibition showcases cultural treasures, dynamic characters and defining moments in Australian performing arts history from the 1790s to the present day and is a poignant […]]]>

The National Library will celebrate the performing arts in a major new exhibition opening to the public on March 4.

On Stage celebrates Australia’s love of the performing arts. The exhibition showcases cultural treasures, dynamic characters and defining moments in Australian performing arts history from the 1790s to the present day and is a poignant reminder of the vital role the performing arts industry has played in Australian cultural life.

Featuring over 180 objects, this free exhibition brings together highlights from the National Library’s extensive performing arts collections.

On Stage: Spotlight on the Performing Arts: Friday March 4 to Sunday August 7, 2022.

Highlights of the exhibition

  • The oldest printed document in Australia, a theater poster from 1796.
  • Photograph taken by Daniel Boud of Ange Sullivan, Head of Lighting at the Sydney Opera House,
  • preparing a ghost light at the Sydney Opera House during the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • A portrait of Sir Robert Helpmann as Oberon in an Old Vic production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream.
  • An image of Rose Quong with an ensemble cast including Laurence Olivier.
  • A costume design by Kristian Fredrikson for a 1975 production of The Revenger’s Tragedy.
  • An image of the audience at the Falls Music and Arts Festival 2007, Lorne, Victoria.
  • A poster for the 2009 Hilltop Hoods: Still Standing tour.
  • A 1945 Cole Bros Circus poster featuring ‘The Great Con Colleano’.
  • A poster for the 1958 production of Summer of the Seventeenth Doll by Ray Lawler.

Quotes attributable to the Director General of the National Library of Australia, Dr Marie-Louise Ayres FAHA:

Our performers and storytellers are our escape, and having been starved of live performances for the past two years, shining a spotlight on the performing arts is a way to recognize the fun they bring to our lives.

You may not think of the National Library when you recall the band poster you had on your bedroom wall as a teenager, but the objects and moments captured in our performing arts collections are huge.

Quotes attributable to the curator of the exhibit and curator of the Rare Books and Music Library, Dr. Susannah Helman

The library’s performing arts collections show just how much Australians love live performances. As a huge fan of live performances of all kinds, I thought I knew the history of Australian performing arts, but our collections opened my eyes to the cultural life Australians of the past might have known.

The library’s performing arts collections are overwhelming and only a selection can be viewed. In the exhibition I tried to represent key moments, productions and performers from our history, to give context to today’s performing arts scene.


For more information, click here

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The National Library of Qatar offers a variety of cultural workshops in March https://savemynjlibrary.org/the-national-library-of-qatar-offers-a-variety-of-cultural-workshops-in-march/ Mon, 28 Feb 2022 07:01:00 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/the-national-library-of-qatar-offers-a-variety-of-cultural-workshops-in-march/ Doha: The Qatar National Library’s March calendar is jam-packed with events for all age groups. To celebrate Arabic Manuscript Day and to mark the significant impact of the Arabic language, the library is particularly focused on heritage, research and learning. On March 2 and to celebrate the Arabic language, the library, in cooperation with the […]]]>

Doha: The Qatar National Library’s March calendar is jam-packed with events for all age groups. To celebrate Arabic Manuscript Day and to mark the significant impact of the Arabic language, the library is particularly focused on heritage, research and learning.

On March 2 and to celebrate the Arabic language, the library, in cooperation with the Qatari Authors’ Forum, will host Dr. Abdelhak Belabed, Associate Professor at Qatar University and a member of the Qatari Authors’ Forum, to discuss the role that the Arabic language plays in promoting the linguistic and cultural safety of its speakers.

On March 3, the library will host an interactive hands-on session that reflects its belief that the key to studying manuscripts is the ability to read correctly, understanding the basics of codicology and transcription methods. The session will begin with a theoretical introduction and guidance, followed by a hands-on reading by participants with Ahmed Mamdouh, manuscript copying specialist and reading trainer.

On March 6, the library will shed light on a popular topic discussed around the world – Metaverse. The event will bring attendees online to learn more about this latest technology. It also aims to highlight how this space is now expanding to include one of the most essential industries: education.

In its role as IFLA’s Preservation and Conservation Center for Arab Countries and the Middle East, the library will host a webinar to mark the inauguration of the new Mass Deacidification Plant on March 7. The webinar will raise awareness of the importance of paper deacidification in the preservation of documentary heritage and its different techniques, in addition to sharing experiences on advances and challenges in deacidification research and methods.

On March 10, the library invites visitors to meet Qatari photographer Moudhi Hamad Al Hajri to celebrate her book In Love with Yemen. During her visit, Moudhi will discuss her trip to Yemen from 2007 to 2013, during which she photographed many landmarks of Yemeni civilization before war broke out.

On March 13, the library will host a series of lectures to answer questions about Islamic manuscript culture. Jointly organized by the Library and the Center for Manuscript Studies of Fatih Sultan Mehmet Vakıf Üniversitesi in Istanbul, the lectures will take place monthly and feature renowned international experts in Islamic codicology and manuscript studies, addressing to academics and the general public.

The library will host an interactive workshop on March 15 where young adults will learn about the importance of career guidance and choosing the right specialization. In collaboration with the Qatar Career Development Center, participants will have the chance to speak with experts in the field of career guidance and counseling, to help them define their goals and provide professional support to achieve their aspirations and goals. future.

On the occasion of Arabic Manuscripts Day, celebrated on April 4 and marking the beginning of Ramadan, the month of the Quran, the library will host an event on March 30 dedicated to the first and most important Islamic manuscript. of the Islamic faith: the Holy Quran. The symposium will bring together a number of international experts dealing with the traditions of Quranic manuscript production over 14 centuries, covering a wide geographical area.

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National Library Lovers Month Reminds Us Why Libraries Matter | News https://savemynjlibrary.org/national-library-lovers-month-reminds-us-why-libraries-matter-news/ Sat, 26 Feb 2022 09:45:00 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/national-library-lovers-month-reminds-us-why-libraries-matter-news/ PRINCETON — Along with fire departments, grocery stores and schools, public libraries are an important part of many communities, so their service to the public is celebrated this month. February is National Library Lover’s Month, a time to celebrate the services libraries provide to the public. The region’s libraries are doing more in the internet […]]]>

PRINCETON — Along with fire departments, grocery stores and schools, public libraries are an important part of many communities, so their service to the public is celebrated this month.

February is National Library Lover’s Month, a time to celebrate the services libraries provide to the public. The region’s libraries are doing more in the internet age than lending books.

“It’s still a central place to get information,” said Benjamin Broyles, a clerk at the Princeton Public Library. “We always have a repository of information not found elsewhere; moreover, we have a lot of physical recordings. We have archives of old newspapers and we have access to computers.

“Another example is our room in West Virginia,” he said. “It has a great amount of local history. We also have documents from local authorities which are not widely distributed. Also in the West Virginia Room we have tons of microfilm rolls with newspapers from the early 1900s and we believe some are from the 1800s.”

Facilities like the Princeton Public Library are a good hub for community events, Broyles said.

“We have book sales every month,” he added.

Public libraries also provide computer access to many local people who don’t have internet access, said director Eva McGuire of the Craft Memorial Library.

“We still have a good chunk of our population that doesn’t have internet access,” McGuire said. “They don’t have computers. They are looking for jobs, and many jobs now only have an online application. They use computers at the library to fill them out.

McGuire said the library is helping students do much of their school work through remote and remote learning.

“Just because you give a kid a laptop doesn’t mean they have internet access at home,” she said. “They come to the library to upload work, submit schoolwork and do research.”

Besides access to computers, libraries often hold regional information that is not always available on the Internet. An example is the Eastern Regional Coal Archive at the Craft Memorial Library.

“It’s the story of our region,” McGuire said.

And in the age of e-books, there’s still a place for shelves full of the print variety.

“We still have a lot of people who want to read printed copies of things,” McGuire said.

Programs that the public can attend at the library offer relief from the isolation inflicted on many people by COVID-19.

“I think a lot of people appreciate more being able to go out and attend programs and see others in a safe environment,” she added.

Further south in Welch, the McDowell County Public Library also offers Internet service to its patrons, in an area where access can be particularly difficult to find. and many patrons still want to read books they can hold, said director Barbara Fields. The library also has room Welch Daily News in its archives; some copies date back to around 1918. This makes the library a resource for people researching their family’s past and local history.

“We have a lot of people from out of state contacting us for obituaries, certain records, and we’ll get them,” Fields said. “You’d be surprised. We get three or four calls a day. A man from Jacksonville, Florida called about a murder that happened here.

People come to research the microfilm archives, and some even call the library to find phone numbers, she added. Libraries also offer other resources; for example, they still offer tax forms. and the McDowell County Public Library has a West Virginia History Room with books and exhibits.

“We also have a children’s library and we have story time,” Fields said. The library also has a book club and a music club; the two clubs meet once a month.

Libraries are like community centers, said deputy director Chris Wilkes of the Tazewell County Public Library, which has branches in Tazewell, Va., as well as Bluefield, Va. and Richlands, Va.

“We welcome many different age groups from all walks of life. We have upper-class patrons and lower-class patrons and we welcome them as equals, and that’s how we like to see the library,” Wilkes said. “It’s just a common space for the public, so you can have different people from different groups and demographics in one place.”

The Tazewell County Public Library also runs many outreach programs, he added.

“I will soon be doing programs with the historical society. Our children’s librarian, she goes and works with nursery schools, works with Main Street School in Tazewell which is a private Christian school,” Wilkes said. “We also work a lot directly with high schools. In the area, we have a program where we automatically give out free digital library cards to all students in Tazewell County so they can check out e-books or check out some of our databases; Plus, beyond the books, we have historical resources you probably couldn’t find in other areas. Our Virginia Room has stuff not only about Tazewell, but about Southwest Virginia, about Southern West Virginia.

The library is working to make more local materials available online.

“Right now I have about 100 yearbooks that I’m about to send to the Library of Virginia to digitize for the public,” Wilkes said. “You can be anywhere in the country, but if you want to see your 1973 yearbook, you can download it online; and I’m scanning newspapers here that are from Tazewell county like Clinch Valley News. We digitize them through the Library of Virginia.

Public libraries are important in rural communities like Grundy, Va., said Brian F. Shortridge, director of the Buchanan County Public Library.

“We’re a lot like the town square,” he said. “People can come here regardless of race or age. We are the great democratization of this world. We are no longer just a book depository. We are truly the meeting place where ideas are shared. I think that’s one of the things we can thrive on. Hopefully we will overcome this pandemic and get back to work. »

Like other libraries, the Buchanan County Public Library offers special programs for the public. In an upcoming example, Francis Gary Powers Jr., son of U-2 spy plane pilot Francis Gary Powers, will be at the library Feb. 28 at 6 p.m. He will talk about his father’s experiences before and after being shot down in the Soviet Union.

In another show, Burt Foster, winner of the second season of the History Channel’s Forged In Fire, will be at the library on March 3. The show will begin at 6 p.m. .

“It will describe the process and tools needed to make a knife,” Shortridge said. “He will guide the audience step by step through the forging process. He will present examples of his work and answer questions from the public.

The library is working to serve as many people as possible, he said.

“We try to offer a wide variety of programs for people who have a lot of different interests,” Shortridge said. “We try to serve the general public. We are a public library and we try to take this responsibility seriously.

— Contact Greg Jordan at gjordan@bdtonline.com

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