public libraries – Save My NJ Library http://savemynjlibrary.org/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 00:59:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://savemynjlibrary.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.png public libraries – Save My NJ Library http://savemynjlibrary.org/ 32 32 Seattle Council Floats Using Seattle Public Library as Emergency Homeless Shelter https://savemynjlibrary.org/seattle-council-floats-using-seattle-public-library-as-emergency-homeless-shelter/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 23:17:42 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/seattle-council-floats-using-seattle-public-library-as-emergency-homeless-shelter/ The Seattle City Council has expressed interest in using the Seattle Public Library as an emergency shelter for the homeless. This idea was proposed on Wednesday when newly appointed Seattle Chief Librarian Tom Fay provided an overview of operations to the council. Councilor Lisa Herbold led a survey in Fay to determine the library’s position […]]]>

The Seattle City Council has expressed interest in using the Seattle Public Library as an emergency shelter for the homeless.

This idea was proposed on Wednesday when newly appointed Seattle Chief Librarian Tom Fay provided an overview of operations to the council. Councilor Lisa Herbold led a survey in Fay to determine the library’s position on the use of its space for emergency shelter capacity.

Seattle Libraries Selects New Chief Librarian Following Remote Work Controversy

“Does your plan consider the possibility of opening as a shelter – not using your staff, but using staff who can serve people staying in a shelter?” Herbold asked.

Herbold said the process would be structured the same way Seattle City Hall was used during the pandemic as a group shelter when the building was not otherwise in use. The Salvation Army staffed City Hall in 2020 with 70–80 accommodation beds on the lower levels of the building.

The council member further explained that the shelter would only open when the libraries do not have enough staff for traditional use, such as during a winter storm. In this case, she speculated that it might be possible for nonprofit staff to run the building as a collective shelter.

“The answer to that particular question is ‘no’ in the sense that if we’re going to open a building, the public expects library services to be offered from that building,” Fay replied. “It’s something that our staff are qualified and able to do, and that’s why we generally won’t consider it in our operations. Trying to maintain comprehensive services obviously requires qualified librarians to maintain the operations of the building. “

“I would say a lot of our buildings wouldn’t lend themselves to this simply because of their size,” Fay continued. “Most of them are quite small and don’t have any open spaces that could really accommodate that. I know the shelter at City Hall is quite large and wide open. It’s not something we considered at this point.

Fay added that libraries appearing to be open but also being used as shelter space could become a point of confusion for the public.

“It would be more problematic for us because they would have expectations of library services that couldn’t be delivered,” Fay said.

“At the start of the pandemic, Seattle Public Libraries saw an urgent need for people who depended on public restrooms, many of which were closed,” council member Herbold wrote to MyNorthwest.

“They responded by partially opening up five buildings, so people could use the restrooms, even though library services were unavailable. Libraries are owned by the City. We need them to bring a flexible spirit to the table during extreme weather emergencies. Staffing constraints caused some libraries to close during our last storm. When these closures occur during life-threatening events, why can’t some libraries operate as day warming centers, staffed by non-librarian staff? »

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Lubbock Public Library Events, February 27 https://savemynjlibrary.org/lubbock-public-library-events-february-27/ Sun, 27 Feb 2022 00:05:19 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/lubbock-public-library-events-february-27/ LUBBOCK, Texas (PRESS RELEASE) — Here is a press release from the Lubbock Public Library: The 2021 federal tax forms have arrived!We have 1040 forms and instruction booklets available in English and Spanish at all Lubbock public libraries! ” Game ! at the Patterson Branch Library Monday February 28 and Thursday March 33:30 p.m. to […]]]>

LUBBOCK, Texas (PRESS RELEASE) — Here is a press release from the Lubbock Public Library:

The 2021 federal tax forms have arrived!
We have 1040 forms and instruction booklets available in English and Spanish at all Lubbock public libraries!

” Game ! at the Patterson Branch Library
Monday February 28 and Thursday March 3
3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Come to the Patterson Branch Library, 1836 Parkway Drive, for an afternoon of board games and video games for K-12 students. For more information, call 806-767-3300.

In-Person Story Hours at the Lubbock Public Library
Come to preschool story time at the library! This week’s schedule is:

  • Library of Mahon (1306 9and Street) — Tuesday, March 1, 10:30 a.m.
  • Patterson Branch Library (1836 Parkway Drive) — Tuesday, March 1, 11:30 a.m.
  • Groves Branch Library (5520 19and Street) — Wednesday, March 2, 10:30 a.m.
  • Godeke Branch Library (5034 Frankford Avenue) — Thursday, March 3, 10:30 a.m.

Virtual Storytime with the Lubbock Public Library
Tuesday, March 1
10:30 a.m.
Join the library at www.Facebook.com/LubbockLibrary for a virtual story hour.

Knit with us at the Groves Branch Library
Tuesday, March 1
1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.
Join us for an afternoon of knitting at the Groves Branch Library, 5520 19and Street. We will meet every Tuesday for the month of March! All skill levels are welcome. Please bring your own needles and threads. For more information, call 806-767-3733.

Hub City Book Club: Chapter One at the Lubbock Adult Activity Center
Wednesday March 2
10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
Join us for a new book club located at the Lubbock Adult Activity Center, 2001 19and Street. In March we will discuss the book Death on the Nile by Agatha Christie. Copies are available for pickup at the Adult Activity Center. For more information, call the Adult Activity Center at 806-767-2710 or the Mahon Library at 806-775-2835.

Adult Computer Classes at Patterson Branch Library
Wednesday March 2
11:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
Join us at Patterson Branch Library, 1836 Parkway Drive for basic computer classes for adults. Each week this month, we’ll cover a different topic! This week, it’s the basics of computers and the Internet. Whether you are a beginner or just need a refresher, this course is for you! For more information, call 806-767-3300.

Toddler Storytime at Godeke Branch Library
Wednesday February 23
12:30 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Come to the Godeke Branch Library, 5034 Frankford Avenue, for a free story hour and book, courtesy of Literacy Lubbock. For more information, call Literacy Lubbock at 806-775-3634

Dr. Seuss’s Birthday Celebration at Mahon Library
Friday March 4
5:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Before heading to the First Friday Art Trail, let’s celebrate Dr. Seuss’ birthday with stories, musical creations and free books courtesy of Literacy Lubbock! This free family event will take place between Mahon Library, 1306 9and Street and Buddy Holly Hall. Show up in your craziest Dr. Seuss outfit to show how much you love reading silly books! For more information, call 806-775-2835.

GED courses at Patterson Branch Library
Saturday February 26
10:00 AM
Literacy Lubbock will host a brand new free GED class meeting at the Patterson Branch Library, 1836 Parkway Drive. This course will give you the tips and tricks you need to pass the GED test! You must be registered with Literacy Lubbock to attend. Registration is free! For more information, contact Literacy Lubbock at 806-775-3634

Worth the Wait (Fertility Support Group) at Mahon Library
Saturday March 5
10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
This peer-run support group and book club is open to people dealing with infertility, miscarriage or infant loss. You’re not alone. We meet the first Saturday of each month at Mahon Library, 1306 9and Street. For more information, call 806-775-2835.

(City of Lubbock Press Release/Lubbock Public Library)

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National Library Lovers Month Reminds Us Why Libraries Matter | News https://savemynjlibrary.org/national-library-lovers-month-reminds-us-why-libraries-matter-news/ Sat, 26 Feb 2022 09:45:00 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/national-library-lovers-month-reminds-us-why-libraries-matter-news/ PRINCETON — Along with fire departments, grocery stores and schools, public libraries are an important part of many communities, so their service to the public is celebrated this month. February is National Library Lover’s Month, a time to celebrate the services libraries provide to the public. The region’s libraries are doing more in the internet […]]]>

PRINCETON — Along with fire departments, grocery stores and schools, public libraries are an important part of many communities, so their service to the public is celebrated this month.

February is National Library Lover’s Month, a time to celebrate the services libraries provide to the public. The region’s libraries are doing more in the internet age than lending books.

“It’s still a central place to get information,” said Benjamin Broyles, a clerk at the Princeton Public Library. “We always have a repository of information not found elsewhere; moreover, we have a lot of physical recordings. We have archives of old newspapers and we have access to computers.

“Another example is our room in West Virginia,” he said. “It has a great amount of local history. We also have documents from local authorities which are not widely distributed. Also in the West Virginia Room we have tons of microfilm rolls with newspapers from the early 1900s and we believe some are from the 1800s.”

Facilities like the Princeton Public Library are a good hub for community events, Broyles said.

“We have book sales every month,” he added.

Public libraries also provide computer access to many local people who don’t have internet access, said director Eva McGuire of the Craft Memorial Library.

“We still have a good chunk of our population that doesn’t have internet access,” McGuire said. “They don’t have computers. They are looking for jobs, and many jobs now only have an online application. They use computers at the library to fill them out.

McGuire said the library is helping students do much of their school work through remote and remote learning.

“Just because you give a kid a laptop doesn’t mean they have internet access at home,” she said. “They come to the library to upload work, submit schoolwork and do research.”

Besides access to computers, libraries often hold regional information that is not always available on the Internet. An example is the Eastern Regional Coal Archive at the Craft Memorial Library.

“It’s the story of our region,” McGuire said.

And in the age of e-books, there’s still a place for shelves full of the print variety.

“We still have a lot of people who want to read printed copies of things,” McGuire said.

Programs that the public can attend at the library offer relief from the isolation inflicted on many people by COVID-19.

“I think a lot of people appreciate more being able to go out and attend programs and see others in a safe environment,” she added.

Further south in Welch, the McDowell County Public Library also offers Internet service to its patrons, in an area where access can be particularly difficult to find. and many patrons still want to read books they can hold, said director Barbara Fields. The library also has room Welch Daily News in its archives; some copies date back to around 1918. This makes the library a resource for people researching their family’s past and local history.

“We have a lot of people from out of state contacting us for obituaries, certain records, and we’ll get them,” Fields said. “You’d be surprised. We get three or four calls a day. A man from Jacksonville, Florida called about a murder that happened here.

People come to research the microfilm archives, and some even call the library to find phone numbers, she added. Libraries also offer other resources; for example, they still offer tax forms. and the McDowell County Public Library has a West Virginia History Room with books and exhibits.

“We also have a children’s library and we have story time,” Fields said. The library also has a book club and a music club; the two clubs meet once a month.

Libraries are like community centers, said deputy director Chris Wilkes of the Tazewell County Public Library, which has branches in Tazewell, Va., as well as Bluefield, Va. and Richlands, Va.

“We welcome many different age groups from all walks of life. We have upper-class patrons and lower-class patrons and we welcome them as equals, and that’s how we like to see the library,” Wilkes said. “It’s just a common space for the public, so you can have different people from different groups and demographics in one place.”

The Tazewell County Public Library also runs many outreach programs, he added.

“I will soon be doing programs with the historical society. Our children’s librarian, she goes and works with nursery schools, works with Main Street School in Tazewell which is a private Christian school,” Wilkes said. “We also work a lot directly with high schools. In the area, we have a program where we automatically give out free digital library cards to all students in Tazewell County so they can check out e-books or check out some of our databases; Plus, beyond the books, we have historical resources you probably couldn’t find in other areas. Our Virginia Room has stuff not only about Tazewell, but about Southwest Virginia, about Southern West Virginia.

The library is working to make more local materials available online.

“Right now I have about 100 yearbooks that I’m about to send to the Library of Virginia to digitize for the public,” Wilkes said. “You can be anywhere in the country, but if you want to see your 1973 yearbook, you can download it online; and I’m scanning newspapers here that are from Tazewell county like Clinch Valley News. We digitize them through the Library of Virginia.

Public libraries are important in rural communities like Grundy, Va., said Brian F. Shortridge, director of the Buchanan County Public Library.

“We’re a lot like the town square,” he said. “People can come here regardless of race or age. We are the great democratization of this world. We are no longer just a book depository. We are truly the meeting place where ideas are shared. I think that’s one of the things we can thrive on. Hopefully we will overcome this pandemic and get back to work. »

Like other libraries, the Buchanan County Public Library offers special programs for the public. In an upcoming example, Francis Gary Powers Jr., son of U-2 spy plane pilot Francis Gary Powers, will be at the library Feb. 28 at 6 p.m. He will talk about his father’s experiences before and after being shot down in the Soviet Union.

In another show, Burt Foster, winner of the second season of the History Channel’s Forged In Fire, will be at the library on March 3. The show will begin at 6 p.m. .

“It will describe the process and tools needed to make a knife,” Shortridge said. “He will guide the audience step by step through the forging process. He will present examples of his work and answer questions from the public.

The library is working to serve as many people as possible, he said.

“We try to offer a wide variety of programs for people who have a lot of different interests,” Shortridge said. “We try to serve the general public. We are a public library and we try to take this responsibility seriously.

— Contact Greg Jordan at gjordan@bdtonline.com

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February is National Library Lover’s Month https://savemynjlibrary.org/february-is-national-library-lovers-month/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 10:25:37 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/february-is-national-library-lovers-month/ Pleasanton Public Librarian Dorothy Steelman LISA LUNA | PLEASANTON EXPRESS February is National Library Lover’s Month. If you haven’t been through your local libraries lately, you’re definitely missing something. Atascosa County Librarians invite the community to recognize the value of libraries in our community and celebrate how they enrich our lives. The Pleasanton Public Library […]]]>

Pleasanton Public Librarian Dorothy Steelman LISA LUNA | PLEASANTON EXPRESS

February is National Library Lover’s Month. If you haven’t been through your local libraries lately, you’re definitely missing something. Atascosa County Librarians invite the community to recognize the value of libraries in our community and celebrate how they enrich our lives.

The Pleasanton Public Library is located at 115 N. Main St. in downtown Pleasanton.

Dorothy Steelman has served as the Pleasanton Public Librarian since June 2015. From 2002 to 2013, she served as the Lakehills Public Librarian in Bandera County. She shared the story of how her work found her, as at the time she was a stay-at-home mom asking how she could volunteer. Although a bachelor’s degree is not required for library managers in rural areas, the Lakehills librarian was pleased to learn that Steelman had a bachelor’s degree in computer science, as the staff disliked working with computers. The Lakehills librarian had just been hired in Castroville, so she asked Steelman if she was interested in a job. Thus began his career. She then earned her Masters in Library Science through a program at Texas Woman’s University.

Above, young people take part in Toddler Time at the Pleasanton Public Library, led by Gina Stewart.  Toddler Time takes place throughout the year, every Tuesday from 10 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.  LISA LUNA |  PLEASANTON EXPRESS

Above, young people take part in Toddler Time at the Pleasanton Public Library, led by Gina Stewart. Toddler Time takes place throughout the year, every Tuesday from 10 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. LISA LUNA | PLEASANTON EXPRESS

Besides Steelman, the Pleasanton Public Library staff includes Gina Stewart, Kelly Simms and Amanda Seiler, their newest employee.

The county librarians group is close by and offers this much needed support.

“In Atascosa County, we all have a really good relationship with each other,” Steelman said. “If we have a situation where we need another perspective or someone to vent to, we all have a relationship where we can call each other up, and we do.”

Growing up, she never saw herself as a librarian. His family was joking and asking how many times people had told him to “shhh.” Steelman replied that today’s library is different. She tells customers they are welcome to speak in their normal voice. She only draws the line at the library used as a playground. For example, she will not allow children to play hide and seek in the piles of books. She shared how much she loves working in the Brush Country.

“I love working here in Pleasanton. It gave me an opportunity that I didn’t think I would ever have, because I went back and got my master’s degree in 2009.”

Through the special program of TWU in collaboration with the Institute of Museum and Library Sciences, 30 rural library managers had the opportunity to obtain their master’s degree. Steelman was one of two chosen in the South African region and she only had to pay for her books.

“It helped me when I came here to apply and I already had a master’s degree even though I technically didn’t need to have one,” she added.

Steelman likes to let the public know that if you live in Atascosa County, you have the option of having up to five library cards.

“You just need to show proof of Atascosa County residency and you can join one of five county libraries.”

These libraries are Pleasanton, Jourdanton, Poteet, Charlotte and Lytle.

Each library offers different programs and services. Currently, Pleasanton Public Library is the only one that offers Overdrive and Libby. As a larger library, Pleasanton has more public computers.

“Pleasanton has the healthiest budget in the county and we are credited with a population of approximately 24,000,” Steelman said. “That’s why the population served doesn’t really reflect the actual census.”

She is grateful that City Council and the City Manager see the importance of attending meetings and visiting offsite locations. For example, she regularly attends Atascosa Citizens in Action and Atascosa Interagency Council meetings. She visited Coastal Bend College and Our Lady of Grace Catholic School to discuss the use of their databases.

Steelman knows that customer service is important, in addition to being a warm and welcoming place.

Many go to the library to make copies or send faxes. The library also displays flyers on different events, programs, etc. to inform the public. In addition, when it comes to using computers, library staff have to be careful about the help they provide to a patron due to liability issues, especially when it comes to declare taxes, open a bank account, etc.

“We can get you where you need to go, but it’ll be up to you what you need to do,” Steelman explained.

She demonstrated the many features of Libby, which is an application used to access the electronic part of their catalog. It is web based so all you need is internet access and you can access the card catalog from anywhere.

There are two ways to access the home page, either directly from the web address or through the City of Pleasanton at www.pleasantontx.gov. February 22 was the last day you could download Overdrive, which was updated to Libby.

Your screen will ask if you have a library card and then take you to search for a library. Type in Pleasanton’s postcode, 78064, and you’ll see the Lonestar Digital Library.

“The reason he’s saying this instead of the Pleasanton Public Library is because we’re part of a consortium,” Steelman said.

While some libraries allow people to get their library card online, the Pleasanton Public Library does not. You must physically go inside to get a card. Also, if you get a library card for your child, you must bring that child. You can’t get a card for them without them.

The consortium is made up of more than 30 libraries putting their money and shared resources together to “get more for our money,” as Steelman described it. E-books and audiobooks are very expensive, she noted. The city pays $3,000 a year to be part of the consortium.

She shared the pros and cons of each loan model. For example, on a Kindle, no one knows what you are reading. Also, you can vary the font style, color, and font size. Audiobooks are great for listening while you exercise or clean the house. You can vary the speed of the narration and it will even tell you how much time is left.

With Libby, you can search by author, get alerted when that specific author publishes another book, see what’s available at all consortium libraries, find out when your loan expires, put something on hold, and more. You can also create tags, similar to a news feed.

Steelman is happy to talk about Libby and available databases such as Learning Express. People can learn about hobbies and crafts, get your GED, tutorials, small engine repair, and more. The databases are free to any resident of the State of Texas. There is also Career Accelerator which is linked to Indeed. You can learn about job outlook, salary range and more. The databases are peer-reviewed, amazing, and free to those with a library card, shared Steelman.

“We pay for our library to have access and it’s not very expensive. If we were to try to get these databases, each one individually, it would cost the city over $100,000, but the state acts as the middleman and we get it through the state. So we only pay a few hundred dollars a year.

The library offers Toddler Time every Tuesday at 10 a.m. Curbside service is also available Monday, Wednesday and Friday for 1.5 hours in the morning and 1.5 hours in the afternoon. They are very busy during the summer. Even last year without a summer reading, they still hit door counts of 2,650 in June and 2,575 in July.

In addition, the library has an interlibrary loan program. If you want a book and the Pleasanton Library does not have it, they can request that it be loaned to another library. This is a free service that can take anywhere from two days to two weeks. You bring the book back from the library and the staff mails it back to the other library.

The Pleasanton Library also circulates hotspots for $10 a day and you’re limited to a week. You get a kit to use with the adapter, cord, etc. that you signed. There are charges if you break or lose it.

Steelman also explained how public libraries are the community’s 4-1-1. People like to stop in or call, especially when they’re new in town. They ask about phone service, garbage pickup, etc.

“So people know they can do it, they can call their library to find out, or they just come in and use the computer because theirs at home hasn’t been set up yet,” Steelman said. “They need to scan something and we don’t charge for the scan at all because there’s no paper or ink involved.”

The Pleasanton Public Library is open Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Visit them today and discover them. You can also reach them at 830-569-5901.

Look in next week’s Pleasanton Express for articles on the Jourdanton, Poteet and Charlotte libraries.

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Celebrating Black History Month with Milwaukee Public Library for February “Book of the Month” | WUWM 89.7 FM https://savemynjlibrary.org/celebrating-black-history-month-with-milwaukee-public-library-for-february-book-of-the-month-wuwm-89-7-fm/ Mon, 07 Feb 2022 20:40:02 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/celebrating-black-history-month-with-milwaukee-public-library-for-february-book-of-the-month-wuwm-89-7-fm/ At WUWM, we celebrate Black History Month throughout the month of February. Every month here on lake effectwe’re partnering with the Milwaukee Public Library for our Book of the Month series to bring you new reading recommendations. For February, we’ll hear from Librarian Brittany Lee, Adult Services Librarian at the Washington Park branch, about her […]]]>

At WUWM, we celebrate Black History Month throughout the month of February. Every month here on lake effectwe’re partnering with the Milwaukee Public Library for our Book of the Month series to bring you new reading recommendations.

For February, we’ll hear from Librarian Brittany Lee, Adult Services Librarian at the Washington Park branch, about her picks.

Lee’s first book recommendation is calledBlack girls must die exhausted” by Jayne Allen.

Milwaukee Public Library

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Milwaukee Public Library

Black Girls Must Die Exhausted by Jayne Allen

The story follows a 33-year-old African American woman named Tabitha Walker, a journalist in Los Angeles, Lee summarizes. Lee says the book stood out for her because she felt like she was suffering from burnout and going through the same ordeals as protagonist Walker, who just receives heartbreaking news about her health when readers meet her. .

“I’m trying to branch out and read more African American authors. There’s a lot of new work coming out,” Lee says. “The storyline feels very close to how I’m living my life right now. It’s nice to read about someone who is kind of similar but still fictional at the same time.”

Lee also recommends a few additional readings to check out. She suggests “The Vanishing Half” by Brit Bennett, a book part of the Milwaukee Public Library’s Novel Ideas Book Club.

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Milwaukee Public Library

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Milwaukee Public Library

The Vanishing Half by Brit Bennett

Another book is “Yellow House” by Sarah M. Broom. This book is part of the Climate Action Book Club of Milwaukee.

The Milwaukee Public Library is launching its Black History Reading Challenge for Black History Month, Lee adds. The challenge is for all ages and contestants must read three books about black culture or written by black authors.

“It can be graphic novels, non-fiction — pretty much anything around those two criteria. You can save anything you read. Once you’re done, you can turn in your report cards. vote at any of your public libraries in Milwaukee,” Lee says. .

Challenge winners have a chance to win a gift or gift card. It’s important to note that the Milwaukee Public Library is adding many more programs for children, teens, and adults throughout the month. For example, an East Branch librarian is hosting a Black Love Panel, and Lee adds that she has her own program for black Americans in Milwaukee on February 23.

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National Library Day to be observed on Saturday https://savemynjlibrary.org/national-library-day-to-be-observed-on-saturday/ Thu, 03 Feb 2022 14:27:00 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/national-library-day-to-be-observed-on-saturday/ The Department of Public Libraries is holding a National Library Day 2022 press conference at its office in the capital on Thursday.—New Age Photo National Library Day-2022 will be observed across the country on Saturday with the theme Digital library is the pledge of the country’s Golden Jubilee. The Department of Public Libraries of the […]]]>

The Department of Public Libraries is holding a National Library Day 2022 press conference at its office in the capital on Thursday.—New Age Photo

National Library Day-2022 will be observed across the country on Saturday with the theme Digital library is the pledge of the country’s Golden Jubilee.

The Department of Public Libraries of the Ministry of Cultural Affairs will observe the day by organizing different programs to make people more library-oriented.

In addition, Bangla Academy, Jatiya Grantha Kendro, Kabi Nazrul Institute, Bangladesh Shilpakala Academy, University of Dhaka, Bangladesh Library Association, District Administrations and others will also observe the day. .

The announcement was made at a press conference held at the capital’s Department of Public Libraries on Thursday.

Secretary for Cultural Affairs Abul Monsur, Additional Secretary for Cultural Affairs, Library Section Ashim Kumar Dey and Director General of Public Libraries Department Abubakar Siddique among others were present at the press conference.

Abul Monsur said a discussion and cultural program would be held following the Covid-19 health security measures at the premises of Shahbagh Public Library Department marking the day.

“We are going to observe National Library Day for the fifth time. Libraries have a great role to play in creating an enlightened society and eradicating illiteracy,” said Abul Monsur.

He mentioned that public and private libraries across the country have organized programs to celebrate the day with great enthusiasm and are striving to improve their service quality.

The inaugural ceremony will take place in the morning.

Interior Minister Asaduzzaman Khan will attend as chief guest while State Minister for Cultural Affairs KM Khalid and Chairman of the Standing Committee of Ministry of Cultural Affairs Simin Hossain Rimi will attend the program as guests specials.

Former Vice Chancellor of the University of Dhaka, AAMS Arefin Siddique, will be present as a keynote speaker at the program, which will be chaired by the Secretary of the Ministry of Cultural Affairs, Abul Monsur.

Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina declared February 5 National Library Day in 2017 and the day was observed for the first time in 2018.

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Coaldale Public Library events during the months of January and February. https://savemynjlibrary.org/coaldale-public-library-events-during-the-months-of-january-and-february/ Fri, 28 Jan 2022 16:42:49 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/coaldale-public-library-events-during-the-months-of-january-and-february/ The Coaldale Public Library is hosting another Lego Club event. The public library wants to invite children in grades 1-6 to build, create and play with Legos, followed by a tasty snack. This event takes place every Tuesday from 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. “Each week for the Lego club we have children who come […]]]>

The Coaldale Public Library is hosting another Lego Club event.

The public library wants to invite children in grades 1-6 to build, create and play with Legos, followed by a tasty snack. This event takes place every Tuesday from 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.

“Each week for the Lego club we have children who come to explore creativity with Lego in a collaborative environment. We normally have weekly challenges for participants for the last twenty minutes or so, then after that we give each child a snack before he leaves. That’s the essence of the Lego Club,” said Morgan Sorensen, Coaldale Public Library program coordinator.

The Coaldale Public Library is proud to be a member of the Chinook Arch Regional Library System, a cooperative of 33 public libraries in southwestern Alberta. With your library membership, you have access to collections and resources from all Chinook Arch member libraries.

The Coaldale Public Library is committed to maintaining current and highly engaging materials, in a variety of formats, for people of all ages and interests.

Many other activities for children through January include Family Literacy Day, which takes place on January 26, and begins at 11 a.m. for story time and a family scavenger hunt. After class ends, join us at 4 p.m. to sing along with local musician Trevor Christensen. Sing along and be entertained at this unique musical event the whole family will love.

The library will also be offering prizes as part of this event. Another event in January is an adult book club that meets at the end of the month to discuss popular and new fiction in various genres. Yet, due to COVID, many attending members are being held on Zoom.

February’s events are Foundational Digital Literacy Skills in Digital Media, a course run by the Coaldale Public Library, which is a free course to learn more about digital media. The library also noted that classes are scheduled for an in-person event. It may turn into a virtual event if new restrictions are announced.

For more information about the event, you can visit the Coaldale Public Library website at coaldalelibrary.ca.

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“Help us”: the insoluble dilemma of the National Library https://savemynjlibrary.org/help-us-the-insoluble-dilemma-of-the-national-library/ Fri, 28 Jan 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/help-us-the-insoluble-dilemma-of-the-national-library/ Rachel Esson is out of ideas. “We tried book fairs. We tried to donate. After plans to ship 600,000 rarely used books overseas were halted following months of book sector setbacks, the National Librarian issued an appeal to save books from the pulping machine: “We really don’t want to recycle them…help us.” Esson won’t hesitate […]]]>

Rachel Esson is out of ideas. “We tried book fairs. We tried to donate.

After plans to ship 600,000 rarely used books overseas were halted following months of book sector setbacks, the National Librarian issued an appeal to save books from the pulping machine: “We really don’t want to recycle them…help us.”

Esson won’t hesitate to believe that the books in the collection published overseas will be officially removed from the library – she just doesn’t know what to do with them after that.

It’s one of the many challenges facing Esson, who took office exactly a year ago, taking over from Bill Macnaught. She says 2022 marks the start of an exciting new chapter for the National Library.

National Librarian Rachel Esson says the job is and isn't what she thought it would be.

Jericho Rock-Archer / Stuff

National Librarian Rachel Esson says the job is and isn’t what she thought it would be.

READ MORE:
* Documenting the pandemic – how Archives NZ and the National Library are monitoring
* Authors unite in literary protest against National Library’s Internet Archive deal
* National Library signs ‘historic’ deal to donate 600,000 books to online archives
* Call for suspension of culling of National Library books during review

It is continuing the New Zealand Libraries Partnership Program after the government allocated $58.8 million to help the country’s library ecosystem recover from the effects of Covid-19.

This year it will support Archives New Zealand with a major new building, which will physically link the cultural repository to the library and create a heritage campus in Pōneke.

Esson hopes the work done by the National Library will help break stereotypes about libraries.

JERICHO ROCK-ARCHER/Stuff

Esson hopes the work done by the National Library will help break stereotypes about libraries.

It will continue to work with and alongside iwi and Maori, and is taking steps to intensify this commitment with the appointment of Ruki Tobin, the library’s first kaihautū (Maori chief) in over a decade.

The archives named their own kaihautū, Anahera Morehu. Diversity gaps have been addressed within the sector and among library staff, Esson says.

Papers Past, which digitizes historical documents, turns 21 this year. Collecting digital material will remain a priority, but how best to get a representative slice of Aotearoa at any given time remains a challenge. And it must keep up with ever-changing methods of preserving content.

Then there is Covid-19, which continues to keep the library on edge. The library will continue to support community, school and kura, public and special libraries, assuming an industry leadership role, as Te Papa does for museums nationwide.

Work to help Aotearoa grow a nation of readers – including through inaugural Reading Ambassador Ben Brown – continues.

The functioning of libraries is changing. The use of e-books and online books has exploded. Libraries are offering more services than ever before, including tutorials for shopping online during lockdown and helping people register for vaccine passes.

Esson says she won't be able to please everyone with the collection's 600,000 books published overseas.

Jericho Rock-Archer / Stuff

Esson says she won’t be able to please everyone with the collection’s 600,000 books published overseas.

The most important thing about public libraries is that they are one of the last spaces where people don’t have to buy anything to be there, Esson says. This concept is often referred to as a “third space”, different from home and work. With denser housing, it will be more important for people to have those spaces, she says.

Esson, whose first job at the library was as a photo archive assistant at the Alexander Turnbull Library in the mid-1980s, says she is a “librarian at heart.”

Is the role of National Librarian what she thought it would be?

Yes, from the perspective of engaging with stakeholders and promoting library mahi, and planning for the future. Not because of the unique challenges and controversies that come with it – namely what to do with the 600,000 books in the collection published overseas.

Esson says she is establishing a dialogue with stakeholders after taking a break from the ongoing saga late last year.

Esson stands in front of a work by Alexander Turnbull - his first library work was in the photographic archive of the Alexander Turnbull Library in the mid-1980s.

Jericho Rock-Archer / Stuff

Esson stands in front of a work by Alexander Turnbull – his first library work was in the photographic archive of the Alexander Turnbull Library in the mid-1980s.

She plans to poll the industry on their key concerns and ideas, after the library encountered major resistance to plans to donate the books to the offshore Internet Archive, which is embroiled in a copyright lawsuit.

Esson will not reconsider keeping rarely used overseas books, which will make room for a larger Maori and Peaceful collection. But sending them to the recycling bin is the library’s “absolute last resort.”

“People care so passionately about it. But the world has moved on and we don’t need to keep them,” she says. “It’s not good for New Zealand, and for us, to keep them. And they’re not being used. And they’re available elsewhere. All these arguments. We’ll find a way through, but I’m not sure we can please everyone.

Esson says the “unnecessary misinformation” escalated before Dec. 1, when the library gave authors and publishers the option to opt out of the donation if their book made the shortlist.

The library’s decision to get rid of the books is linked to its work on diversity and inclusion for all New Zealanders, she says.

Esson says she is a librarian

JERICHO ROCK-ARCHER/Stuff

Esson says she is a librarian “at heart.”

“There are voices that are very loud – a particular sector that is very well served. They perceive any change as a threat to them. But it’s like in fact everything is set up for you.

After Partnership Program funding ends in June, the library will begin research that will attempt to measure the impact of funding on people – for example, how many more children learned to read – compared to the number of books she paid.

Libraries often fail to provide evidence and data about their value, which contributes to taking them for granted and stereotyping library work, Esson says. It also causes libraries to underestimate their own impact.

“People say they want to be a journalist or a lawyer or a doctor,” she says. “Have you ever heard someone say, ‘I want to be a librarian’? We have this responsibility towards future generations. It’s not about [us]this is Aotearoa.

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Memorandum of Understanding signed to automate the network of national libraries by introducing modern digital infrastructure. https://savemynjlibrary.org/memorandum-of-understanding-signed-to-automate-the-network-of-national-libraries-by-introducing-modern-digital-infrastructure/ Thu, 02 Dec 2021 01:31:56 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/memorandum-of-understanding-signed-to-automate-the-network-of-national-libraries-by-introducing-modern-digital-infrastructure/ Sri Lanka’s Information and Communication Technology Agency (ICTA) announced the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding between the National Library,Sri Lanka Documentation Services Board and 18 local authorities to implement the “Digital Libraries Project”. As part of this project, twenty-six (26) model digital libraries are being established, covering all districts of Sri Lanka and at […]]]>


Sri Lanka’s Information and Communication Technology Agency (ICTA) announced the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding between the National Library,
Sri Lanka Documentation Services Board and 18 local authorities to implement the “Digital Libraries Project”.

As part of this project, twenty-six (26) model digital libraries are being established, covering all districts of Sri Lanka and at the National Library. The model libraries will be equipped with the widely used “Koha” integrated library management system and introduce a modern digital infrastructure.

One of the main objectives of this project is to provide citizens with convenient and affordable access to electronic information, books and educational materials. The pilot phase of the project started in 2017. At the same time, public libraries in Colombo, Badulla, Polonnaruwa, Batticaloa, Kurunegala, Opnayake, Kirimetiya and the National Library were opened to the public. The first phase of the project started in 2020 to deploy the solution in 18 public libraries.

This initiative is one of many initiatives led by the ICTA digital government vertical in line with a long-term roadmap for the digitization of public sector services. One of the essential goals of the digitization of the public sector is to improve processes taking into account the needs of citizens in order to serve citizens in an efficient and practical way. Many projects are underway to create the necessary infrastructure of solutions, platforms, technologies and shared processes to create valuable user-centric services and improve the ease of doing business through policy reforms and integrated services focused on business needs. Thus guaranteeing efficiency in transactions with the government.

The memorandum of understanding was signed in the presence of Eng. Mahinda B. Herath, Managing Director, ICTA, Mr Kanchana Thudugalla, Director of Digital Government ICTA, and Mr.
Sonala Gunawardhena, President of the National Library of Sri Lanka, and MWSunil, Director General of the National Library and the Documentation Services Board, as well as many representatives of the local authorities involved in the project.


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Signing of a memorandum of understanding to automate the network of national libraries by introducing a modern digital infrastructure – adaderana biz english https://savemynjlibrary.org/signing-of-a-memorandum-of-understanding-to-automate-the-network-of-national-libraries-by-introducing-a-modern-digital-infrastructure-adaderana-biz-english/ Wed, 01 Dec 2021 12:04:54 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/signing-of-a-memorandum-of-understanding-to-automate-the-network-of-national-libraries-by-introducing-a-modern-digital-infrastructure-adaderana-biz-english/ The Information and Communication Technology Agency (ICTA) of Sri Lanka has announced that a Memorandum of Understanding has been signed between the National Library, the Documentation Services Board of Sri Lanka and 18 local authorities to implement the “Digital Libraries Project”. As part of this project, twenty-six (26) model digital libraries are being established, covering […]]]>


The Information and Communication Technology Agency (ICTA) of Sri Lanka has announced that a Memorandum of Understanding has been signed between the National Library, the Documentation Services Board of Sri Lanka and 18 local authorities to implement the “Digital Libraries Project”.

As part of this project, twenty-six (26) model digital libraries are being established, covering all districts of Sri Lanka and at the National Library. The model libraries will be equipped with the widely used “Koha” integrated library management system and introduce a modern digital infrastructure.

One of the main objectives of this project is to provide citizens with convenient and affordable access to electronic information, books and educational materials. The pilot phase of the project started in 2017. At the same time, public libraries in Colombo, Badulla, Polonnaruwa, Batticaloa, Kurunegala, Opnayake, Kirimetiya and the National Library were opened to the public. The first phase of the project started in 2020 to deploy the solution in 18 public libraries.

This initiative is one of many initiatives being carried out by the ICTA digital government vertical in line with a long-term roadmap for the digitization of public sector services. One of the essential goals of the digitization of the public sector is to improve processes taking into account the needs of citizens in order to serve citizens in an efficient and practical way. Many projects are underway to create the necessary infrastructure of solutions, platforms, technologies and shared processes to create valuable user-centric services and improve the ease of doing business through policy reforms and integrated services focused on business needs. Thus guaranteeing efficiency in transactions with the government.

The memorandum of understanding was signed in the presence of Eng. Mahinda B. Herath, Chief Executive Officer, ICTA, Mr. Kanchana Thudugalla, Chief Executive Officer of ICTA Digital Government, and Mr. Sonala Gunawardhena, Chairman, National Library of Sri Lanka, and MWSunil, Chief Executive Officer, National Library and Documentation Commission for Services as well as many representatives of the local communities involved in the project.

Upon successful implementation, a nationwide rollout is expected in the near future.


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