public library – Save My NJ Library http://savemynjlibrary.org/ Sat, 19 Mar 2022 14:39:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://savemynjlibrary.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.png public library – Save My NJ Library http://savemynjlibrary.org/ 32 32 Ellwood City Public Library activities for the week of March 21 – Ellwood City, PA news https://savemynjlibrary.org/ellwood-city-public-library-activities-for-the-week-of-march-21-ellwood-city-pa-news/ Sat, 19 Mar 2022 13:22:19 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/ellwood-city-public-library-activities-for-the-week-of-march-21-ellwood-city-pa-news/ Posted By: EllwoodCity.org Staff March 19, 2022 The Town of Ellwood Public Library offers a variety of weekly activities. Information is available by calling the library at 724-758-6458. PLEASE NOTE: The library has partnered with Seneca Library District, Oil Creek Library District, Erie County Public Library, and Crawford County Federated Library System for eBooks. You […]]]>

The Town of Ellwood Public Library offers a variety of weekly activities. Information is available by calling the library at 724-758-6458.

PLEASE NOTE:

The library has partnered with Seneca Library District, Oil Creek Library District, Erie County Public Library, and Crawford County Federated Library System for eBooks. You can now use the Overdrive or Libby app. to borrow books from the above libraries. Please call the library with any questions.

WERE OPEN!

The Library is open. Newspapers, magazines and toys will not be available at this time. Masks must be worn, covering mouth and nose, in the building throughout the visit. We will continue to do curbside pickup. Please call us with the recommended book(s), authors, genre or material you wish to view and our staff will see that it is alphabetically in the lobby for you. We always make our returns in specially marked containers in our hall. Please do not put donated books in these bins. 724-758-6458 is the number to call for inquiries.

Hours are Tuesday 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Wednesday 10:00 a.m. to 6:30 p.m., Thursday 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Friday 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. and Saturday 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Please remember that no one is available to take your calls unless it is during the hours indicated above.

Activities taking place this week include.

TUESDAY MARCH 22

  • 10:00 a.m. – “Baby Laptime,” a program for babies, toddlers, and preschoolers conducted via Facebook.
  • 6:00 p.m. – “Just Me and You Book Group”, will discuss the book “President of the Whole 5th Grade” by Sherri Winston on Zoom.

WEDNESDAY MARCH 23

  • Tony Crow will be at the library from 10:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. to help veterans. No appointment necessary.

THURSDAY MARCH 24

  • 6:00 p.m. – “Family Laptime”, a program for babies, toddlers and preschoolers conducted via Facebook

Sign up for the monthly e-newsletter to keep up to date with all the programs and activities happening at the library.

Here are the commemorative contributions received by the library during the month of March. Theses are published on a weekly basis in this section and represent part of the contributions received.

MEMOIRS:

  • In Memory of Carl F. Agostinelli by Ron and Debbie Atkinson
  • In Memory of Marian C. Fray by Liz Patterson and Nadene Hipple
  • In memory of Joseph Francis Valerian Jaeger by Ron and Debbie Atkinson
  • In memory of Mary “Dolly” Frances Lucas of Samuel Teolis Funeral Home, Inc.
  • In memory of Lester J. Miller by Doris and Laurie Keane
  • In memory of Loretta G. Paganie by Doris and Laurie Keane
  • In memory of Annie Trivilino of Samuel Teolis Funeral Home, Inc.
  • In memory of Joseph A. Valentino, Sr. of Liz Pratt, Samuel Teolis Funeral Home, Inc.
  • In Memory of Andrew Woloszyn by Ron and Debbie Atkinson
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Library plans planting session, Growing Reade – Times News Online https://savemynjlibrary.org/library-plans-planting-session-growing-reade-times-news-online/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 15:59:23 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/library-plans-planting-session-growing-reade-times-news-online/ Published on March 16, 2022 at 11:38 am Earth Day is April 22. With spring fast approaching, the buds have come out on the plants and the things that are growing are at the forefront of our thoughts. On April 18 and 19, we are organizing a planting session at the library. Free for all, […]]]>

Published on March 16, 2022 at 11:38 am

Earth Day is April 22. With spring fast approaching, the buds have come out on the plants and the things that are growing are at the forefront of our thoughts.

On April 18 and 19, we are organizing a planting session at the library. Free for all, this event is from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. each day. Bring a flower pot if you wish.

We are also thinking about how to “grow” our budding readers. What better way for a library to increase readership than to introduce a program just for them?

We will launch this program – Growing Readers – after Easter, April 17th. The Wayne County Public Library generously shared its Growing Readers program with the Catasauqua Public Library.

If you have young children, you may have heard of the 1000 Pound Program before kindergarten. The program asks caregivers and children to read 1,000 books together.

We decided to aim for 500 books to read with a carer. For every 10 books read, children will receive a special sticker. After reading 250 books, children will receive a book to keep, and when they have read 500 books, they will receive a certificate and a special prize.

Reading to a child is the most important thing adults can do to prepare children to read. Children introduced to reading early tend to start reading earlier and excel in school and throughout their lives. Moreover, it creates many happy memories between children and adults who read them.

It may seem like a lot to hit 500 pounds, but one bedtime pound a day will help a child reach that goal very quickly. Families can participate in this program any time before kindergarten.

You might want to start right away! Come and pick up your reading book at the library whenever you want. We ask caregivers to keep an accurate count of books read with our growing readers, using the reading log.

NEW BOOKS

Fiction: “Becoming my sister”, VC Andrews; “Dream City”, David Baldacci; “The Christie Affair”, Nina de Gramont; “A Relative Murder”, Jude Deveraux; “The Golden Couple,” Greer Hendricks and Sarah Pekkanen; “The Missing Piece”, John Lescroart; “Summer Getaway”, Susan Mallery; “The Darkest Place”, Phillip Margolin; “Fear Thy Neighbour,” Fern Michaels; “Death of the Black Widow,” James Patterson and JD Barker; “22 Seconds,” James Patterson and Maxine Paetro; “The Investigator”, John Sandford; “High Stakes,” Danielle Steel; “Nine Lives,” Peter Swanson; “French Braid”, Anne Tyler

Works of Fiction: “One Thing After Another: Memoirs of an Attorney General”, William Barr; “Shadow-Man: An Elusive Psychopathic Killer and the Birth of FBI Profiling”, Ron Franscell; “Watergate: A New History,” Garrett M. Graff; “The Whole Body Reset: Your Weight Loss Plan for a Flat Belly, Optimal Health, and a Body You’ll Love in 40s and Beyond,” Stephen Perrine with Heidi Skolnik; “The Founders: The Story of PayPal and the Entrepreneurs Who Shaped Silicon Valley,” Jimmy Soni; “Take Control of Your Diabetes Risk,” John Whyte, MD, M.Ph.

Juvenile: “The Three Bears: Lily to the Rescue”, W. Bruce Cameron; “The Haven Trials (Minecraft)”, Suyi Davies; “On Purpose (Cat Kid Comic Club #3)”, Dav Pilkey; “Flames of Hope (Wings of Fire, Book 15)”, Tui Sutherland

Young adult: “Galant”, VE Schwab; “I must betray you”, Ruta Sepetys

Picture books for children: “What am I going to do with my love today?” Kristin Chenoweth; “Why not you?” Ciara and Russell Wilson; “Pretty Perfect Kitty-Corn”, Shannon Hale and Leuyen Pham; “The Library Fish,” Alyssa Satin Capucilli; “Minions: Five Minute Stories”, Illumination Entertainment; “The Seasons of the Mouse”, Leo Lionni; “Kitten-loving,” Florence Minor; “National Geographic Little Kids First Big Book of Baby Animals”, Maya Myers; “Edward and Annie: A Penguin Adventure”, Caryn Rivadeneria

Board books for children: “The very hungry caterpillar’s first spring (The world of Eric Carle)”, Eric Carle

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Bella Vista Public Library resumes regular hours https://savemynjlibrary.org/bella-vista-public-library-resumes-regular-hours/ Sun, 13 Mar 2022 07:21:58 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/bella-vista-public-library-resumes-regular-hours/ BELLA VISTA – After another covid-related shutdown in January, the Bella Vista Public Library is resuming its busy schedule of events. Customers are thrilled, according to Kacy Earnest Spears, the library’s public relations and events coordinator. Some patrons are looking for reading material, but many are looking for groups who can now meet in the […]]]>

BELLA VISTA – After another covid-related shutdown in January, the Bella Vista Public Library is resuming its busy schedule of events.

Customers are thrilled, according to Kacy Earnest Spears, the library’s public relations and events coordinator.

Some patrons are looking for reading material, but many are looking for groups who can now meet in the expanded library space, she said.

During the longer covid shutdown in 2020, the library expansion was completed and part of the move into the new space was accomplished. The meeting rooms did not open immediately because they were waiting for furniture, but now the larger community room and the smaller conference room are ready for the public.

The community hall has 80 chairs, Spears said, although some are usually stocked. The conference room can accommodate eight people. Both bedrooms have TVs and plenty of outlets for groups who want to use their own technology.

Some groups that meet in the library are organized by staff, but outside groups may also request to use the space. The women’s civic club, Altrusa, met there recently, for example.

A letter writing club meets once a month with the Apple Computer Club.

Many groups stopped meeting during covid, Spears said, so they’re happy to have the chance to see each other again. The library has a meeting room usage policy, so any club can inquire about space usage as long as they follow the policy. They can bring snacks, including covered drinks, but not a full meal. Currently, there is space available on the calendar, but that could change, she said.

Currently, the library’s calendar, bvpl.org/calendar, shows book clubs ranging from “Not Your Mama’s Romance Book Club” — the online description promises “hot heroes, strong heroines and lots spices” — to sci-fi clubs or mystery readers.

Events include evenings with adult speakers. Recently a speaker discussed the history of Ozark Moonshine. On April 4, Dale Phillips and Xyta Lucas, co-presidents of the Bella Vista Historical Society, will present Dug Hill Through the Years. Dug Hill is the church located downtown and visible from US 71. Earnest Spears said she often gets referrals for speakers and likes to use local resources as much as possible.

Story time has also made a comeback. Preschool story time is at 10 a.m. on Fridays. Family story time, which targets children ages 6 to 8, is at 5:30 p.m. on Tuesdays. The two story hours usually include a craft.

Teen nights are for 13-17 year olds and meet when the library is closed on Friday evenings once a month.

Puzzles will be presented in the community room at 3 p.m. Wednesday.

Knitters and crocheters meet one Thursday a month.

The Summer Reading Program, which had been virtual for two years, will return in person this summer. The Summer Reading Program is open to adults and children.

The hugely popular Halloween event, Spooktacular, has turned into Treat Street and will be repeated in October. It offers crafts as well as treats, she said.

For more information, visit the library’s web page at bvpl.org.

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Free programs offered by the Phoenixville Public Library – The Mercury https://savemynjlibrary.org/free-programs-offered-by-the-phoenixville-public-library-the-mercury/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 14:04:19 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/free-programs-offered-by-the-phoenixville-public-library-the-mercury/ The Phoenixville Public Library will host an in-person discussion of the Longwood Gardens community reading book for adults, The Songs of Trees, on Monday, March 14 at 7:00 p.m. With “The Songs of Trees: Stories from Nature’s Great Connectors,” you can travel with author David Haskell as he repeatedly visits a dozen trees in cities […]]]>

The Phoenixville Public Library will host an in-person discussion of the Longwood Gardens community reading book for adults, The Songs of Trees, on Monday, March 14 at 7:00 p.m. With “The Songs of Trees: Stories from Nature’s Great Connectors,” you can travel with author David Haskell as he repeatedly visits a dozen trees in cities from Manhattan to Jerusalem, forests (Amazon, North -American and Boreal) and areas on the front environmental changes, including coastal erosion, scorched mountainsides and war zones. In each place, it shows how human history, ecology and well-being are intimately linked to the life of trees. Scientific, lyrical and contemplative, “The Songs of Trees” reveals the biological connections that underlie all life. In a world plagued by barriers, Haskell reminds us that the substance and beauty of life emerges from relationships and interdependence. Physical copies of the book can be reserved at https://catalog.ccls.org. Copies of eBooks and audiobooks are available at https://chester.overdrive.com. Chat participants will automatically be entered into a raffle to receive a family pass to Longwood Gardens. This event is free and open to the public. Registration is required at https://ccls.libcal.com/calendar/Phoenixville/songs-of-trees or by calling 610-933-3013 x132. More information about Longwood Community Reading can be found at https://longwoodgardens.org/education/community-read/community-read-2022.


The Phoenix Book Club, the Phoenixville Public Library’s book discussion group for adults of all ages, will meet virtually on Monday, March 14 at 7:00 p.m. The group will discuss the award-winning biography, “A Woman of No Importance: The Untold Story of the American Spy Who Helped Win World War II” by Sonia Purnell. In 1942, the Gestapo sent an urgent transmission: “She is the most dangerous of all Allied spies. We must find it and destroy it. That spy was Virginia Hall, a young American — rejected from the Foreign Service because of her gender and her prosthetic leg — who worked her way into the spy organization dubbed the “unkind War Department” of Churchill and, even before the United States entered the war, became the first woman to deploy to occupied France. Virginia Hall was one of the greatest spies in American history, but her story remains unknown. A physical copy of this book can be reserved at https://www.ccls.org. An eBook or eAudiobook copy can be reserved at https://chester.overdrive.com. The public is invited to attend. If you are not already on the Book Club mailing list, you must sign up at https://ccls.libcal.com/calendar/Phoenixville/woman-of-no-importance to receive an invitation to this event Zoom. Email mpinto@ccls.org for more information.


The Phoenixville Public Library will host a free virtual presentation by Keisha Blair, author of “Holistic Wealth,” on Thursday, March 17 at 7:00 p.m. Keisha Blair, an award-winning bestselling author, with a book that is now highly acclaimed and recognized worldwide by some of the world’s biggest influencers like Arianna Huffington, producers of Mel Robbins’ Red Table Talk Show, Jada Pinkett Smith, shares the story of the journey to holistic wealth. Her latest book is “Holistic Wealth Expanded and Updated: 36 Life Lessons To Help You Recover from Disruption, Find Your Life Purpose and Achieve Financial Freedom,” with a foreword written by iconic actress Kelly Rutherford, star of “Gossip Girl “, “Dynasty” and “Melrose Place”. Keisha Blair’s work has impacted millions of people around the world and she is now considered the “Mother of Holistic Wealth” and the founder of the Holistic Wealth Movement. She is an economist by training and a graduate of the Executive Leadership Program at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government.Keisha Blair is also the host of the Holistic Wealth podcast with Keisha Blair and the founder of the Institute on holistic wealth. Her writing has appeared in CBC, AARP, The New York Observer, MSN, Yahoo and many other publications. She has been featured in The New York Times, Real Simple Magazine, Forbes, The Winnipeg Free Press and has been featured in the Harvard Business Review, among many other publications. Her upcoming book “Holistic Wealth (Expanded and Updated): 36 Life Lessons To Help You Recover From Disruption, Find Your Life Purpose and Achieve Financial Freedom” was released on International Women’s Day (March 8). This event is free and open to the public and will be held online via Zoom. Registration is required at https://ccls.libcal.com/calendar/Phoenixville/holistic-wealth or by calling 610-933-3013 x132. Email mpinto@ccls.org for more information.


The Phoenixville Public Library will host a free in-person “Medicare 102” presentation on Monday, March 21 at 7:00 p.m. Counselors from PA-MEDI, Pennsylvania’s free Medicare counseling service, will provide information on wellness visits, preventive services covered, hospitalization or observation status, outpatient observation notification of Medicare (MOON), Medicare Part B Covered Equipment, Diabetic Supplies, Fraud, and Suite. This event is free and open to the public. Registration is required at https://ccls.libcal.com/calendar/Phoenixville/medicare102 or by calling 610-933-3013 x132. Email mpinto@ccls.org for more information.


Buying your first home? The Phoenixville Public Library will be presenting a free, in-person “Workshop for First Time Homebuyers” on Thursday, March 24 at 7:00 p.m. Kimberly Kozelsky of Cross Country Mortgage and Donna Cable of Re/Max Professional Realty will be the presenters. This informative seminar will discuss mortgages, pre-approvals, common credit myths, types of loan programs, buyer’s agents, sales contracts, home inspections and the importance of communication during the home buying process. This event is free and open to the public. Registration is required at https://ccls.libcal.com/calendar/Phoenixville/first-time-homebuyer or by calling 610-933-3013 x132. Email mpinto@ccls.org for more information.


Free in-person technical support is available at the Phoenixville Public Library during select hours on Monday afternoons and Tuesday and Wednesday evenings. One-hour appointments for help with your laptop, tablet or smartphone with the library’s volunteer tutors are available by calling 610-933-3013 x132.

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system to celebrate National Library Week | County life https://savemynjlibrary.org/system-to-celebrate-national-library-week-county-life/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/system-to-celebrate-national-library-week-county-life/ National Library Week 2022 will take place from April 3-9. This is a time to reflect on the importance of libraries and library workers in communities across our country, and the importance of supporting and defending libraries. The Halifax County and South Boston Public Library System will celebrate National Library Week with two programs at […]]]>

National Library Week 2022 will take place from April 3-9. This is a time to reflect on the importance of libraries and library workers in communities across our country, and the importance of supporting and defending libraries.

The Halifax County and South Boston Public Library System will celebrate National Library Week with two programs at the South Boston Public Library. The library hasn’t held any indoor programming since the pandemic began in 2020, so the return of indoor programming to libraries will be another reason to celebrate.

On Tuesday, April 5, from 5 to 8 p.m., the South Boston Public Library will host a reading of banned books. Copies of several different books that have been challenged or banned will be available for people to read. Everyone in attendance will receive a “Reading Forbidden Books” sticker. Refreshments will be available from 5 p.m.

On Saturday, April 9 at 11 a.m., author Tierra Bethel will discuss her book, “Let There Be Sound,” in the upstairs meeting room of the South Boston Public Library.

A resident of North Carolina, Bethel earned her undergraduate degree from Virginia Tech and her MBA from Liberty University. Having experienced hearing loss growing up, her book helps individuals understand hearing loss and overcome the misconceptions that surround the condition. Refreshments will be served during this program.

Celebrate National Library Week 2022 with the Halifax County and South Boston Public Library System.

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Donation will help rebuild West Lexington Public Library Branch https://savemynjlibrary.org/donation-will-help-rebuild-west-lexington-public-library-branch/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 00:37:21 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/donation-will-help-rebuild-west-lexington-public-library-branch/ The Marksbury Family Foundation has committed the main donation for the fundraising campaign LEXINGTON, Ky. (WTVQ) – The Lexington Public Library and the Lexington Public Library Foundation announced Wednesday that the Marksbury Family Foundation has committed the lead donation for the fundraising campaign to rebuild the corner library branch. from Versailles Road and Village Drive. […]]]>
The Marksbury Family Foundation has committed the main donation for the fundraising campaign

LEXINGTON, Ky. (WTVQ) – The Lexington Public Library and the Lexington Public Library Foundation announced Wednesday that the Marksbury Family Foundation has committed the lead donation for the fundraising campaign to rebuild the corner library branch. from Versailles Road and Village Drive. In recognition of the foundation’s generosity, the new facility will be named the Marksbury Family Branch when it opens in 2024, according to the library.

The library purchased the site in late 2020 after renting the facility for 15 years, with the intention of demolishing the current building.

A new two-story facility will replace it with nearly triple the space available for library services. The new building will include community and study rooms, a dedicated classroom, craft space, outdoor reading area, expanded adult and children’s spaces, and a drive-thru window where customers can pick up and return the borrowed material.

The Library estimates that it will serve approximately 1 million visitors per year at this location.

The Library Foundation has pledged to raise $5.3 million to support this $17 million project through a public-private partnership.

The Marksbury Family Foundation, founded by Davis Marksbury, invests in innovative projects that provide lasting opportunity and change the lives of individuals and communities.

“We are thrilled to invest in this community-wide resource, which provides countless educational resources for everyone in the greater Lexington area,” said Logan Marksbury, president of the Marksbury Family Foundation. “Our family has been very fortunate and we love providing new opportunities for others to succeed through our Foundation.”

The Marksbury Family Foundation has supported the University of Kentucky, the Lexington Leadership Foundation’s Woodhill Community Center, the Blue Grass Community Foundation’s Good Giving Challenge, and many other projects in educational and entrepreneurial spaces.

This donation is the largest commitment in the history of the Lexington Public Library Foundation, which has supported our public library system since 1997.

“The Library Foundation’s fundraising success is a testament to the commitment of our donors and the impact of the Lexington Public Library system,” said Erin Serrate, Chair of the Library Foundation Board of Trustees. . “Like the people it serves, the Library has unlimited potential, and our role is to ensure that the Library has the financial resources it needs to meet the educational needs of our community.

The Library Foundation supports new projects, capital needs and specialized programs. Recent investments include Destination Kindergarten (with the PNC Foundation’s Grow Up Great initiative), the Eastside Branch (contributing $1.3 million to the project), and the Kloiber Foundation STEAM Lab, which will open later this month.

“Our library system thrives when our community comes together,” said Executive Director Heather Dieffenbach. “We are grateful for the support of the Marksbury Family Foundation and the leadership of the Lexington Public Library Foundation. Together, we will accomplish great things to support the citizens of Central Kentucky. For more information about the project or to get involved, please visit www.lexpublib.org/village.

For general information about the Lexington Public Library, their programs and partners, please visit www.lexpublib.org and their social media pages @lexpublib.

Follow the Library Foundation on Facebook at @lexingtonpubliclibraryfoundation or visit www.lexpublib.org/foundation.

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Mesa Public Library Partnership Brings New Sensory Programming to Los Alamos – Los Alamos Reporter https://savemynjlibrary.org/mesa-public-library-partnership-brings-new-sensory-programming-to-los-alamos-los-alamos-reporter/ Tue, 08 Mar 2022 04:01:34 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/mesa-public-library-partnership-brings-new-sensory-programming-to-los-alamos-los-alamos-reporter/ COUNTY NEWS RELEASE Through a collaboration between Mesa Public Library and Las Cumbres Community Services, a new Sensory Friendly Movement and Music program is offered free of charge to children ages 0-6 and their caregivers. The program will take place on the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month from 9:30 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. […]]]>

COUNTY NEWS RELEASE

Through a collaboration between Mesa Public Library and Las Cumbres Community Services, a new Sensory Friendly Movement and Music program is offered free of charge to children ages 0-6 and their caregivers. The program will take place on the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month from 9:30 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. starting March 9and. The program will be held at the new Las Cumbres Community Services site in the former Playschool Montessori building, 1060 Nugget St., Los Alamos.

Trained facilitators will use gentle movement, low lighting, natural voices, limited props, and plenty of personal space to create a welcoming and accepting program for neurodiverse children. Program staff welcomes feedback from families in order to provide the best possible program.

The partnership between Mesa Public Library and Las Cumbres grew out of the Community Educator’s Network, a monthly meeting of community educator minds hosted by Youth Services Librarian Melissa Mackey. Mackey understood that the library can be too stimulating a setting and saw an opportunity to bring the popular library program, Music and Movement, offsite to the Las Cumbres community. “We wanted it for a long time; patrons have expressed a need. Library staff are thrilled to partner with Las Cumbres to offer our most popular library program framed differently,” says Melissa.

Program dates are subject to change due to ongoing COVID-19 precautions, and anyone interested in attending should contact the Mesa Public Library Youth Services Department for the most up-to-date information at (505) 668-8257.

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Storytime at Newton Public Library will resume on March 23 – The Kansan https://savemynjlibrary.org/storytime-at-newton-public-library-will-resume-on-march-23-the-kansan/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 12:04:57 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/storytime-at-newton-public-library-will-resume-on-march-23-the-kansan/ By Kansan Staff The pandemic and staff changes have caused a hiatus in storytime at the Newton Public Library, but the program is set to return. The library recently announced that an eight-week spring story hour for young children and their caregivers will resume in March. 23. Story time for toddlers (18-36 months) will be […]]]>

By Kansan Staff

The pandemic and staff changes have caused a hiatus in storytime at the Newton Public Library, but the program is set to return.

The library recently announced that an eight-week spring story hour for young children and their caregivers will resume in March. 23.

Story time for toddlers (18-36 months) will be on Wednesdays at 10:30 a.m. Story time for preschoolers (3-5 years) will be available at 10:30 a.m. Thursday or Friday.

“In addition to the usual nursery rhymes, songs and storybooks, we plan to incorporate activity stations where parents can play with their children in an activity related to the storytime theme. The hope is that some of these activities will be things they can replicate at home with their children,” said Children’s Services Coordinator Sara Rickard.

StoryTime weekly programs are designed to meet children’s early literacy needs through stories, rhymes, songs and games – while strengthening the bond between child and caregiver and cultivating a love for the library .

“The goal is not just to get kids excited about books, words and stories, but also to equip parents with some skills they can use to encourage early literacy at home,” Rickard said. .

Encouraging early literacy means helping children recognize sounds, develop their vocabulary, understand how a story works, and express themselves through words and stories – foundational skills that will eventually lead to reading and to writing.

Along with the resumption of StoryTime, the children’s level play area will reopen after an extended closure due to COVID-19. The area will feature new toys to foster imaginative play, including a train table, interactive streetscape floor mat, play kitchen, and new puzzles and blocks.

“For example, we’re not going to teach a toddler to write their name, but we’ll talk about shapes, and once they’re familiar with shapes, they can eventually understand that ‘C’ is like a circle. , and that sort of thing,” Rickard said. “Children’s main job is to play, so if we can play with them while incorporating those things, that’s the best way for them to learn.”

Pre-registration is not required, parents and guardians are encouraged to subscribe to the library’s children’s services mailing list in order to receive the latest updates and reminders .

StoryTime participants ages 3 and up are welcome and encouraged to wear masks, but masks are not required. Free masks for children and adults are available at the library.

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Seattle Council Floats Using Seattle Public Library as Emergency Homeless Shelter https://savemynjlibrary.org/seattle-council-floats-using-seattle-public-library-as-emergency-homeless-shelter/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 23:17:42 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/seattle-council-floats-using-seattle-public-library-as-emergency-homeless-shelter/ The Seattle City Council has expressed interest in using the Seattle Public Library as an emergency shelter for the homeless. This idea was proposed on Wednesday when newly appointed Seattle Chief Librarian Tom Fay provided an overview of operations to the council. Councilor Lisa Herbold led a survey in Fay to determine the library’s position […]]]>

The Seattle City Council has expressed interest in using the Seattle Public Library as an emergency shelter for the homeless.

This idea was proposed on Wednesday when newly appointed Seattle Chief Librarian Tom Fay provided an overview of operations to the council. Councilor Lisa Herbold led a survey in Fay to determine the library’s position on the use of its space for emergency shelter capacity.

Seattle Libraries Selects New Chief Librarian Following Remote Work Controversy

“Does your plan consider the possibility of opening as a shelter – not using your staff, but using staff who can serve people staying in a shelter?” Herbold asked.

Herbold said the process would be structured the same way Seattle City Hall was used during the pandemic as a group shelter when the building was not otherwise in use. The Salvation Army staffed City Hall in 2020 with 70–80 accommodation beds on the lower levels of the building.

The council member further explained that the shelter would only open when the libraries do not have enough staff for traditional use, such as during a winter storm. In this case, she speculated that it might be possible for nonprofit staff to run the building as a collective shelter.

“The answer to that particular question is ‘no’ in the sense that if we’re going to open a building, the public expects library services to be offered from that building,” Fay replied. “It’s something that our staff are qualified and able to do, and that’s why we generally won’t consider it in our operations. Trying to maintain comprehensive services obviously requires qualified librarians to maintain the operations of the building. “

“I would say a lot of our buildings wouldn’t lend themselves to this simply because of their size,” Fay continued. “Most of them are quite small and don’t have any open spaces that could really accommodate that. I know the shelter at City Hall is quite large and wide open. It’s not something we considered at this point.

Fay added that libraries appearing to be open but also being used as shelter space could become a point of confusion for the public.

“It would be more problematic for us because they would have expectations of library services that couldn’t be delivered,” Fay said.

“At the start of the pandemic, Seattle Public Libraries saw an urgent need for people who depended on public restrooms, many of which were closed,” council member Herbold wrote to MyNorthwest.

“They responded by partially opening up five buildings, so people could use the restrooms, even though library services were unavailable. Libraries are owned by the City. We need them to bring a flexible spirit to the table during extreme weather emergencies. Staffing constraints caused some libraries to close during our last storm. When these closures occur during life-threatening events, why can’t some libraries operate as day warming centers, staffed by non-librarian staff? »

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Mesa Public Library Offers Rewards-Based Adventure For Area Newcomers – Los Alamos Reporter https://savemynjlibrary.org/mesa-public-library-offers-rewards-based-adventure-for-area-newcomers-los-alamos-reporter/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 06:16:40 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/mesa-public-library-offers-rewards-based-adventure-for-area-newcomers-los-alamos-reporter/ COUNTY NEWS RELEASE The Mesa Public Library, in partnership with several local institutions, hosts Newcomer Adventure: Welcome to Los Alamos for those new to the Los Alamos community and ready to explore! This program starts today, March 1st, is free to the public and operates year-round. Designed to help newcomers familiarize themselves with their surroundings, […]]]>

COUNTY NEWS RELEASE

The Mesa Public Library, in partnership with several local institutions, hosts Newcomer Adventure: Welcome to Los Alamos for those new to the Los Alamos community and ready to explore! This program starts today, March 1st, is free to the public and operates year-round. Designed to help newcomers familiarize themselves with their surroundings, the rewards-based program offers a fun and structured way to experience Los Alamos and White Rock.

To participate in the program, pick up the Newcomer Adventure flyer (which will provide additional instructions) at a participating location: Mesa Public Library, White Rock Branch Library, Los Alamos Chamber of Commerce, Los Alamos Visitor Center, White Rock Visitor Center, Betty Ehart Senior Center, White Rock Senior Center, Bradbury Science Museum, Los Alamos History Museum, Los Alamos County Animal Shelter, Los Alamos County Aquatic Center, Fuller Lodge Art Center, Los Alamos Nature Center (Pajarito Environmental Education Center) and Los Alamos Eco Station .

To complete the Newcomer’s Adventure, follow the instructions on the flyer to collect one token of each color – red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and purple – from at least six of the eleven pickup locations. For example, you can find your orange token at the Betty Ehart Senior Center or the White Rock Senior Center. When you’ve collected all six tokens, take them to the Mesa Public Library or White Rock Branch Library to exchange for a free Los Alamos-themed book. Twelve choices of books are available, limit of one book per household. There is no time or age limit for this adventure. All newcomers to Los Alamos are invited to participate!

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