university library – Save My NJ Library http://savemynjlibrary.org/ Sat, 12 Mar 2022 17:06:50 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://savemynjlibrary.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.png university library – Save My NJ Library http://savemynjlibrary.org/ 32 32 Clarkson University Libraries First University Library to Complete Sustainable Libraries… | News https://savemynjlibrary.org/clarkson-university-libraries-first-university-library-to-complete-sustainable-libraries-news/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 16:45:14 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/clarkson-university-libraries-first-university-library-to-complete-sustainable-libraries-news/ Potsdam, NY, March 11, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Clarkson University Libraries has just become the first university library to complete the rigorous Sustainable Libraries Initiative certification program. The academic certification program encourages collaboration with other campus sustainability efforts and reaches beyond the university to position the university library as a resource and leader in broader […]]]>

Potsdam, NY, March 11, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Clarkson University Libraries has just become the first university library to complete the rigorous Sustainable Libraries Initiative certification program. The academic certification program encourages collaboration with other campus sustainability efforts and reaches beyond the university to position the university library as a resource and leader in broader community resilience.

“Participation on various university committees over the past few years has helped us position Clarkson University Libraries as a critical agency in the campus sustainability mission. We know that environmental sustainability is at the heart of Clarkson’s business. The University has consistently achieved gold ratings from the Higher Education Sustainability Monitoring, Evaluation and Rating System (AASHE STARS). The mission of our libraries says: “Incorporate sustainability issues into all of our practices. From our perspective, this statement sets the tone for all faculty and staff to align their decisions, big and small, with environmental best practices, consideration of social equity and accountability. financial,” said Dean of Libraries Michelle Young. .

With all campus facilities working together to reduce waste and find ways to recycle as much as possible, there is a collaborative and transformational vision for sustainability that fosters new ideas. Newly renovated spaces on campus, including the libraries, feature Energy Star-qualified computers and appliances, LED lighting, and energy-efficient HVAC systems and low-flow plumbing fixtures. Clarkson University uses the Siemens tracking system to compile and monitor energy consumption across the campus. There is a 12-acre, 2-megawatt solar field to generate clean energy for the campus.

Libraries purchase paper products ensuring the highest possible recycled content and ban polystyrene products. Reusable utensils and dishes are used in the library kitchen. In addition to environmental sustainability, Clarkson University Libraries’ commitment to fiscal responsibility, community engagement, and social well-being is essential to meeting the full triple bottom line definition used by the SLCP. Both within the library and across campus, there is a stated commitment to equity, diversity, and inclusion. This has been demonstrated by actions such as the creation and publication of an anti-discrimination reading list, Expanding our Worldview, which includes a reading list and multimedia resources to help students consider new perspectives and challenge to find a broader context to understand the experiences of others.

Recent space renovations at Clarkson University Libraries have focused on their physical space and storage. Creating more study spaces and small groups accessible to the public resulted in a reduction in storage of 1.25 miles of print journals. With more archives available electronically, the library has maintained access to most of these holdings without the need for physical space. Limited space for printed materials is both a challenge and an advantage. The libraries’ willingness to try an innovative open floor plan earned them the respect of faculty, colleagues, and university administration and helped promote the library as a modern institution on campus. The challenge of holding limited print resources has led to marketing and outreach efforts that seek to redefine library services for their campus community. Libraries participate in campus events focused on sustainability. Together with the Institute for Environmental Sustainability, they are planning an Earth Day celebration this year.

The Sustainable Libraries Initiative will continue to pilot its academic library certification program with a full national rollout of the program expected later this year. To learn more about the Sustainable Libraries Initiative, click here: https://sustainablelibrariesinitiative.org/

Attachment

Clarkson Library

Melissa Lindell Clarkson University 315-268-6716 mlindell@clarkson.edu

Copyright 2022 GlobeNewswire, Inc.

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Clarkson University Libraries is the first university library to complete the Sustainable Library Certification Program https://savemynjlibrary.org/clarkson-university-libraries-is-the-first-university-library-to-complete-the-sustainable-library-certification-program/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 19:36:37 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/clarkson-university-libraries-is-the-first-university-library-to-complete-the-sustainable-library-certification-program/ Clarkson University Libraries has just become the first university library to complete the rigorous Sustainable Libraries Initiative certification program. The academic certification program encourages collaboration with other campus sustainability efforts and reaches beyond the university to position the university library as a resource and leader in broader community resilience. “Participation on various university committees over […]]]>

Clarkson University Libraries has just become the first university library to complete the rigorous Sustainable Libraries Initiative certification program. The academic certification program encourages collaboration with other campus sustainability efforts and reaches beyond the university to position the university library as a resource and leader in broader community resilience.

“Participation on various university committees over the past few years has helped us position Clarkson University Libraries as a critical agency in the campus sustainability mission. We know that environmental sustainability is at the heart of Clarkson’s business. The University has consistently achieved gold ratings from the Higher Education Sustainability Monitoring, Evaluation and Rating System (AASHE STARS). The mission of our libraries says: “Incorporate sustainability issues into all of our practices. From our perspective, this statement sets the tone for all faculty and staff to align their decisions, big and small, with environmental best practices, consideration of social equity and accountability. financial,” said Dean of Libraries Michelle Young. .

With all campus facilities working together to reduce waste and find ways to recycle as much as possible, there is a collaborative and transformational vision for sustainability that fosters new ideas. Newly renovated spaces on campus, including the libraries, feature Energy Star-qualified computers and appliances, LED lighting, and energy-efficient HVAC systems and low-flow plumbing fixtures. Clarkson University uses the Siemens tracking system to compile and monitor energy consumption across the campus. There is a 12-acre, 2-megawatt solar field to generate clean energy for the campus.

Libraries purchase paper products ensuring the highest possible recycled content and ban polystyrene products. Reusable utensils and dishes are used in the library kitchen. In addition to environmental sustainability, Clarkson University Libraries’ commitment to fiscal responsibility, community engagement, and social well-being is essential to meeting the full triple bottom line definition used by the SLCP. Both within the library and across campus, there is a stated commitment to equity, diversity, and inclusion. This has been demonstrated by actions such as the creation and publication of an anti-discrimination reading list, Expanding our Worldview, which includes a reading list and multimedia resources to help students consider new perspectives and challenge to find a broader context to understand the experiences of others.

Recent space renovations at Clarkson University Libraries have focused on their physical space and storage. Creating more study spaces and small groups accessible to the public resulted in a reduction in storage of 1.25 miles of print journals. With more archives available electronically, the library has maintained access to most of these holdings without the need for physical space. Limited space for printed materials is both a challenge and an advantage. The libraries’ willingness to try an innovative open floor plan earned them the respect of faculty, colleagues, and university administration and helped promote the library as a modern institution on campus. The challenge of holding limited print resources has led to marketing and outreach efforts that seek to redefine library services for their campus community. Libraries participate in campus events focused on sustainability. Together with the Institute for Environmental Sustainability, they are planning an Earth Day celebration this year.

The Sustainable Libraries Initiative will continue to pilot its academic library certification program with a full national rollout of the program expected later this year. To learn more about the Sustainable Libraries Initiative, click here: https://sustainablelibrariesinitiative.org/

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New from ACRL – “Once Upon a Time in the University Library: Storytelling Skills for Librarians” https://savemynjlibrary.org/new-from-acrl-once-upon-a-time-in-the-university-library-storytelling-skills-for-librarians/ Wed, 26 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/new-from-acrl-once-upon-a-time-in-the-university-library-storytelling-skills-for-librarians/ CHICAGO – The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) announces the publication of “Once Upon a Time in the University Library: Storytelling Skills for Librarians», edited by Maria Barefoot, Sara Parme and Elin Woods. This fun and eminently readable guide offers innovative ideas for integrating storytelling into your teaching and communication, and can inspire […]]]>

CHICAGO – The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) announces the publication of “Once Upon a Time in the University Library: Storytelling Skills for Librarians», edited by Maria Barefoot, Sara Parme and Elin Woods. This fun and eminently readable guide offers innovative ideas for integrating storytelling into your teaching and communication, and can inspire you to invent new ways to use it in your work.

You could say that telling stories is being human. Storytelling has evolved alongside us to provide entertainment through literature, drama and visual arts. He helps shape society through parables, moral tales, and religion. Storytelling plays a role in business, law, medicine, and education in modern society.

Academic librarians can apply storytelling the same way teachers, artists, lawyers, and businesspeople have done for centuries, as education as part of teaching mastery of information and as communication in the areas of referral, awareness, management, evaluation, etc. “Once Upon a Time in the College Library” explores the applications of storytelling in college librarianship in three sections:

  • The Information Literacy Classroom
  • Batteries
  • Physical and virtual spaces of the library

An in-depth introduction addresses the historical and theoretical roots of storytelling, as well as the mechanisms and applications of social justice. Chapter authors demonstrate the use of storytelling to share diverse perspectives that connect with their users, and each chapter contains practical examples of how storytelling can be used in the library and cultural considerations for audiences . The first section focuses on storytelling as a teaching tool; the others include examples of how storytelling has been used as a method of communication in collection sharing and development, at service points and in online spaces.

“Once Upon a Time in the University Library” is available for purchase in to print and as Ebook through the ALA online store; in print via Amazon.com; and by phone order at (866) 746-7252 in the United States or (770) 442-8633 for international customers.

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The Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) is the higher education association for college libraries and librarians. Representing nearly 9,000 people and libraries, ACRL (a division of the American Library Association) develops programs, products and services to help those who work in academic and research libraries learn, innovate and lead within the university community. Founded in 1940, ACRL is committed to advancing learning, transforming scholarship, and building diverse and inclusive communities. Find the ACRL on the the Web, Facebook, Twitter, instagramand Youtube.

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Communities of practice in the university library https://savemynjlibrary.org/communities-of-practice-in-the-university-library/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/communities-of-practice-in-the-university-library/ CHICAGO — How can academic librarians strengthen their teaching practice and provide education through access to information, using intentional efforts to learn and share in a social context? Building and fostering Communities of Practice (CoP) is the ideal path, as Michelle Reale demonstrates in her new book “Communities of Practice in the Academic Library: Strategies […]]]>

CHICAGO — How can academic librarians strengthen their teaching practice and provide education through access to information, using intentional efforts to learn and share in a social context? Building and fostering Communities of Practice (CoP) is the ideal path, as Michelle Reale demonstrates in her new book “Communities of Practice in the Academic Library: Strategies for Implementation», published by ALA Editions. Thanks to his advice, readers will be able to:

  • understand how coming together in the pursuit of common knowledge and goals can lead to a more fulfilling work environment and better professional results;
  • get guidance on how to get started with simple, laid-back collaborative efforts that won’t conflict with busy schedules;
  • learn from Reale’s personal stories of how the CoP took root in its own institution and how it continued to thrive during the shutdowns necessitated by the pandemic;
  • receive a flexible CoP framework for implementation that can be adapted to meet their own needs and goals;
  • see how to nurture conversation, participation, collaborative inquiry and mindfulness, all essential ingredients of the CoP;
  • feel comfortable using personal stories as tools for creating meaning within the CoP as well as ongoing individual learning and growth; and
  • be encouraged to follow through and stick to it, using the reflection questions and activities at the end of each chapter.

Reale is a professor at Arcadia University. His other books include “Meeting the Challenge of Teaching Information Literacy,” “The essential university librarian: teaching and collaborating for change,” “Supervision and management of students of the university library,” and “Becoming a Reflective Librarian and Teacher: Strategies for Mindful Academic Practice.”

Many retailers and book distributors are experiencing service disruptions or delays, including Amazon. For faster service, order directly from the ALA store. ALA Store purchases fund advocacy, outreach and accreditation programs for library and information professionals worldwide. ALA Publishing | ALA Neal Schuman publishes resources used by library and information professionals, scholars, students and educators to improve programs and services, build on best practices, improve pedagogy, share research, develop leadership and promote advocacy. ALA authors and developers are leaders in their fields and their content is published in a variety of print and electronic formats. Contact ALA editions | ALA Neal-Schuman at editionsmarketing@ala.org.

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National Library of Israel Adds 1,600 Ancient Christian Manuscripts to Online Archives | JNS https://savemynjlibrary.org/national-library-of-israel-adds-1600-ancient-christian-manuscripts-to-online-archives-jns/ Thu, 23 Dec 2021 19:33:00 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/national-library-of-israel-adds-1600-ancient-christian-manuscripts-to-online-archives-jns/ Ancient documents, photos and manuscripts from a monastery on the Sinai Peninsula are now available for free on the website of the National Library of Israel. The collection of Saint Catherine’s Monastery includes objects from the 12e century. The monastery library is considerably older as it was founded in the 6th century by the Byzantine […]]]>


Ancient documents, photos and manuscripts from a monastery on the Sinai Peninsula are now available for free on the website of the National Library of Israel.

The collection of Saint Catherine’s Monastery includes objects from the 12e century. The monastery library is considerably older as it was founded in the 6th century by the Byzantine Emperor Justinian the first and is considered the oldest working library.

It contains works in a variety of languages, including Greek, Arabic, Syriac, Georgian, Armenian, and more, which library officials say are a “treasure trove” of texts related to early Christianity.

In addition, the archives contain photos of the monastery and the surrounding land in the aftermath of the Six Day War in 1967, as well as rare colored images filmed by Jacques Soussana, director of photography, photographer and former employee of the National Library, including the woman recently donated the film to the library. The film was digitized with the assistance of the Steven Spielberg Jewish Film Archive and the Jerusalem Cinematheque.

“The digital images of these manuscripts are truly invaluable, especially for scholars of Greek Orthodox Christianity,” said Dr. Stefan Litt, curator of the Humanities Collection at the National Library of Israel, who oversaw the project. “They show us what the manuscripts in the collection looked like over 50 years ago and are now safe and long-term.”

Israel initially created microfilms of some 1,600 manuscripts in the 1960s after reaching an agreement with the Greek Orthodox Archbishop and following a similar archival project carried out by the United States Library of Congress. The microfilms created by what was then called the Jewish National and University Library were rapidly deteriorating, prompting the National Library, as it is now called, to undertake this new digital enterprise.

The post office National Library of Israel adds 1,600 ancient Christian manuscripts to online archive appeared first on JNS.org.


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The 8 main functions of the university library that every student should know ▷ Legit.ng https://savemynjlibrary.org/the-8-main-functions-of-the-university-library-that-every-student-should-know-%e2%96%b7-legit-ng/ Thu, 26 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/the-8-main-functions-of-the-university-library-that-every-student-should-know-%e2%96%b7-legit-ng/ Every educated person studies and learns something new for most of their life. And this is not surprising, because the world is changing very fast, early every minute. So more and more people tend to have more than one degree, they are not afraid to learn, change and adapt to all innovations. And the best […]]]>


Every educated person studies and learns something new for most of their life. And this is not surprising, because the world is changing very fast, early every minute. So more and more people tend to have more than one degree, they are not afraid to learn, change and adapt to all innovations. And the best place to do it is university libraries. So, let’s discuss what it is, as well as the functions of university libraries that are part of the education system.

Functions of the university library. Photo: pixabay.com
Source: UGC

What is the main function of the university library

The university library is usually established in any higher education institution, such as a college, university or institution, and can in a way be called the knowledge center for students. And this is not surprising since it has various collections of books for each faculty or department of a university aimed at helping both students and professors in their research, work and even some leisure activities.

Read also

A handy user interface portal guide for all University of Ibadan students!

However, some of you may not fully understand its objectives and wish to discuss the main functions of the university library in correspondence with the public or locals. So, the main difference between them is in the collection of books presented in libraries.

Therefore, the first and foremost function of the university library among all others is to support all students, professors and other academic staff in their educational pursuit. That’s why it offers not only local volumes of non-fiction, history and archives, but also a selection of non-fiction, classics, modern fiction and scientific literature.

Functions of the university library
The university library is usually established in any higher education. Photo: pixabay.com
Source: UGC

What are the other functions of the university library in teaching and learning

Having already indicated the difference between the types of knowledge houses, let us now highlight all the functions and services of the university library.

The functions of the university library in teaching and learning are as follows:

Read also

What are the people management skills? Find out here and become a good specialist

  1. provide the necessary calm environment for reading, study and research;
  2. provide all students with essential research and reference documents such as bibliographies, biographies, glossaries, summaries, dictionaries, encyclopedias, textbooks, atlases, geographic directories, monographs, etc. ;
  3. inform the university community of the latest scientific and technological developments;
  4. help new students orient themselves on how to research and find needed materials quickly and correctly;
  5. to keep all textbooks, including textbooks and fictions, which are specific to a particular educational institution, in particular those written by its founders and teachers, and relating to its history, its teaching program, etc.
  6. provide students and teachers with bibliographic instruction, interlibrary loan services and research assistance;
  7. help professors write research articles, theses and scientific publications;
  8. and last but not least is to maintain these thousands of years old books so that they can be used and studied.

Read also

What is non-formal education? Methods, definition, types?

But what about his services? Let’s see.

The teaching and learning services of the university library are as follows:

  • study rooms of different sizes for groups of students to study together;
  • the simple or electronic tool presented for collaborative work, such as a dry-erase board, a smart board or any other device for sharing electronic resources;
  • all the necessary computer resources with a wide variety of various specialized software;
  • the most recent technological tools;
  • various printing, scanning and copying resources as well;
  • a systemic system of educational materials needed to support the programs offered in the institution;
  • available field specialists (librarians) who can help students and faculty with research.
Functions of the university library
University library services in teaching and learning. Photo: pixabay.com
Source: UGC

Librarians – as the most important human service in university libraries

Librarians are at the heart of every university library. All of the hard work of maintaining and supporting the entire library alongside the students and educational materials depends on them. They have to process acquisitions, support electronic resources, as well as assist students and faculty while studying and doing research, also finding the necessary information in books and online resources.

Read also

Explore the horizons of science lab technology specialists in Nigeria

However, not everyone can become a librarian. These are usually educated men or women with even double doctorates who specialize in specific types of books. And it’s a pretty hard and demanding job, so they often visit and study various courses, instructions, and sources to do their best on the job.

So you now see how important university libraries are to all students, researchers, scientists and teachers. And how much effort librarians make every day to maintain all functions and services of the library, so that people can easily acquire new knowledge without obstacles.

READ ALSO: List of 20 best Nigerian universities in 2021

Legit.ng published an article on the list of Top 20 Nigerian Universities. Webometrics has released the July 2021 edition of its ranking of universities and other higher education institutions around the world. A review of the rankings shows that the University of Ibadan, Covenant University and Obafemi Awolowo University were in the top three places respectively. Read more in the article.

Read also

Top 3 dramatic functions that influence our society

Source: Legit


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SUNY Geneseo receives the honor of “University Library of the Year” | Local News https://savemynjlibrary.org/suny-geneseo-receives-the-honor-of-university-library-of-the-year-local-news/ Sun, 23 May 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/suny-geneseo-receives-the-honor-of-university-library-of-the-year-local-news/ SUNY Geneseo’s Milne Library was named University Library of the Year by the Rochester Regional Library Council. Milne was chosen from libraries in an area of ​​five counties, including Monroe and Livingston. Council members cited the efforts of Milne staff to provide access to library materials and support students and faculty, including in a virtual […]]]>


SUNY Geneseo’s Milne Library was named University Library of the Year by the Rochester Regional Library Council.

Milne was chosen from libraries in an area of ​​five counties, including Monroe and Livingston.

Council members cited the efforts of Milne staff to provide access to library materials and support students and faculty, including in a virtual environment, during the pandemic, an unplanned library closure and the relocation of the library. library, as well as processing collections in two different storage areas.

Library services are provided to the new Fraser Hall library while Milne is undergoing a $ 35 million renovation. The new facility is expected to open in 2024-2025. The renovation project is a collaboration between the State University Construction Fund and the Provost Marshal’s office at SUNY Geneseo, and the facilities and library teams.

“I am so proud and privileged to work with such an incredible team of dedicated library staff,” said Corey Ha, Director of the Library. “Over the past 18 months, we have been through so many challenges that some libraries may face in their lifetime. However, we persevered, stayed together, worked hard to provide the best library services to our users.

The library has been closed since January 6, 2020, after asbestos particles were first discovered on January 6 by library supervisory staff. It appeared that the particles had fallen from the acoustic ceiling of the library, and the library was closed later that day.

The college’s original intention was to remove asbestos in a one-semester reduction, but in February 2020 SUNY Geneseo President Denise Battles announced her decision to go ahead with a $ 35 million redesign of the space that was due to begin in 2022.

“While it is true that the presence of asbestos in a building does not pose a threat to health and that air quality tests show that the air in Milne is safe, we wanted everyone to everyone feels perfectly at ease visiting our library, ”Battles said in an email to students and staff. “We believe that reducing asbestos would be a temporary solution, one that will inevitably delay our ultimate goal: to completely modernize our library and improve its resources.

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University library leaders concerned about diversity, equity and inclusion https://savemynjlibrary.org/university-library-leaders-concerned-about-diversity-equity-and-inclusion/ Wed, 14 Apr 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/university-library-leaders-concerned-about-diversity-equity-and-inclusion/ The resurgence of the Black Lives Matter movement in 2020 has had a measurable impact on library leaders’ appreciation of the importance of diversity, equity and inclusion, a recent survey of library leaders found. academic libraries of the Ithaka S + R nonprofit research and strategy group. More and more university library leaders are asserting […]]]>


The resurgence of the Black Lives Matter movement in 2020 has had a measurable impact on library leaders’ appreciation of the importance of diversity, equity and inclusion, a recent survey of library leaders found. academic libraries of the Ithaka S + R nonprofit research and strategy group.

More and more university library leaders are asserting their desire to implement anti-racist policies in the wake of national racial justice movements, according to the survey. But most are still concerned that their staffing and fundraising strategies do not adequately support these goals. Many library executives also failed to recognize how the COVID-19 budget cuts likely disproportionately impacted employees of color.

The survey was conducted in the fall of 2020 and includes responses from 638 library directors in four-year institutions. This was the subject of an Ithaka S + R webinar yesterday on the effects of national racial justice movements on library strategy, staff and collections.

Survey respondents were three times more likely to say that the ability to foster equity, diversity and inclusion is one of the three most important skills for a library manager in 2020, compared to 2019. Good that this skill is valued more than before, it remains a low priority for library directors. Only 25% selected this ability for their top three, Jennifer Frederick, senior survey analyst at Ithaka S + R, told the webinar. Frederick co-wrote the investigation report with Christine Wolff-Eisenberg, head of investigation and research for the association.

The ability to manage change was the most valued skill for library managers, with 63% of respondents choosing it as one of their top three, up from 54% in 2019. This finding was highlighted by the panelist from the webinar Patricia Hswe, audience program manager. knowledge to the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, which asked what change library leaders think they are managing.

There is a recurring criticism from Black, Indigenous and Colored staff that change is happening very slowly in libraries, Hswe said. The ability to manage change is perhaps the skill most valued by library managers, but “where is the evidence for this change?” Hswe asked.

Discussions about diversity in a predominantly white profession have been going on for decades, but the number of black library leaders remains the same as it was 30 years ago, said Trevor A. Dawes, vice-president of libraries and libraries. museums and May Morris University librarian at the University of Delaware.

None of the webinar attendees, including Dawes, expressed surprise that the survey indicated little significant movement toward hiring, retaining and promoting more diverse staff and faculty.

Survey respondents reported feeling less confident in their staffing strategies related to equity, diversity, inclusion and accessibility in 2020 than in 2019. Overall, trust in institutional strategies and at the library level remained low, at 26% and 31%, respectively.

Administrators may feel less confident than before because they are now starting to realize that “white supremacy is still prevalent in libraries and society after all the marches and statements,” said Karim Boughida, Dean of Libraries University of Rhode Island scholars, in an email.

Although many institutions issued statements denouncing racism last summer, few have actually taken meaningful steps to support their black and brown students, faculty and staff, said Kaetrena Davis Kendrick, dean. from the Ida Jane Dacus Library and the Louise Pettus Archives and Special Collections at Winthrop. University, during the webinar.

“One of my direct reports recently asked me if I was going to write an anti-racism statement for the library, and I said no. I would prefer that we do certain things and then have something to write about, ”said Davis Kendrick.

The survey found that 84% of library managers did not expect employees of color to be disproportionately affected by cuts due to the pandemic. But Ithaka S + R’s analysis suggested that library positions with a higher percentage of non-white employees were more likely to be affected than other positions.

“I remain concerned, given my work on morale and the way people are treated at work, that leaders don’t know who is affected,” said Davis Kendrick. Library staff of color feel they are in a much more precarious position than their white colleagues in terms of maintaining their posts, she said.

In discussing concrete steps libraries can take to improve their diversity, equity, inclusion and accessibility strategies, panelists agreed that it is not helpful for library leaders to say that they prioritize diversity if it is not an issue that concerns them.

In order to design meaningful strategies, you need to train yourself and hire real experts as consultants and trainers, Boughida said.

“Realize that white supremacy is systemic and not situational, start working intentionally on correcting inequalities,” Boughida said. “Realize that this work is very long term.”

Efforts to diversify the collections should be undertaken in collaboration with faculty members and students so that the material is truly integrated into the curricula, Dawes said. Additionally, staff of color should not be expected to shoulder the burden of diversity work without regular breaks.

“No time to think, but time to get away from work,” said Davis Kendrick.

It can take a long time for libraries to get to a place where they are able to prioritize work on diversity, equity and inclusion, Dawes said. The University of Delaware and the University of Binghamton are both working with Ithaka S + R to undertake an audit of their talent management, from hiring through to when staff members leave the institution.

It took the library four years to get to the point where Dawes felt ready to do such an audit. The results can be difficult to compare, but they will give the institution a baseline against which to measure success, he said.


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New from ACRL – “Leading Together: Academic Library Consortia and Advocacy” https://savemynjlibrary.org/new-from-acrl-leading-together-academic-library-consortia-and-advocacy/ Mon, 12 Apr 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/new-from-acrl-leading-together-academic-library-consortia-and-advocacy/ CHICAGO – The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) announces the publication of “Leading Together: University Library Consortia and Advocacyby Irene MH Herold, a detailed overview of the current work of library consortia and how library and consortia staff can develop and execute advocacy plans. University library consortia have advocacy power. Historically, consortia work […]]]>

CHICAGO – The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) announces the publication of “Leading Together: University Library Consortia and Advocacyby Irene MH Herold, a detailed overview of the current work of library consortia and how library and consortia staff can develop and execute advocacy plans.

University library consortia have advocacy power. Historically, consortia work with their members to create plans and tools around purchasing and sharing materials, advancing the use of open educational resources with your faculty, and many other important issues where influence and the group’s expertise can be put to good use. Advocating for the library within your institution, to stakeholders, and across the system in a unified way is an ever-evolving goal of consortia member leadership.

“Leading Together: Academic Library Consortia and Advocacy” aims to fill the void in the LIS literature of model consortia advocacy plans, actions, and evaluations. It provides an overview of the current landscape of consortia work, consortium advocacy frameworks and other groups, a workshop agenda that can be used to develop an advocacy plan and thoughts for the future.

There is strength in the voice of a consortium – it provides the opportunity to lead together under a unified plan and reinforces the concept that each library contributes the cohesive message needed to influence and persuade the agreed goals of the consortium. “Leading Together” provides tools for staff of university libraries belonging to consortia, staff of consortia and those interested in advocacy work.

“Leading Together: Academic Library Consortia and Advocacy” is available for purchase from to print and as Ebook through the ALA online store; in print via Amazon.com; and by phone order at (866) 746-7252 in the United States or (770) 442-8633 for international customers.

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The Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) is the higher education association for college libraries and librarians. Representing more than 9,000 people and libraries, ACRL (a division of the American Library Association) develops programs, products and services to help those who work in academic and research libraries learn, innovate and lead within the university community. Founded in 1940, ACRL is committed to advancing learning, transforming scholarship, and building diverse and inclusive communities. Find the ACRL on the the Web, Facebook, Twitter, instagramand Youtube.

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“University Library Trends and Statistics 2019” Now Available from ACRL https://savemynjlibrary.org/university-library-trends-and-statistics-2019-now-available-from-acrl/ Thu, 29 Oct 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://savemynjlibrary.org/university-library-trends-and-statistics-2019-now-available-from-acrl/ CHICAGO – The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) announces the publication of “Academic Library Trends and Statistics 2019“, the latest in a series of annual publications describing the collections, staff, expenditures and service activities of academic libraries across all Carnegie classifications. Data from the 2019 survey is available through ACRL Metrics, a service […]]]>

CHICAGO – The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) announces the publication of “Academic Library Trends and Statistics 2019“, the latest in a series of annual publications describing the collections, staff, expenditures and service activities of academic libraries across all Carnegie classifications. Data from the 2019 survey is available through ACRL Metrics, a service of online subscription which provides access to ACRL survey data from 1999 to 2019. Survey respondents can access summary data on ACRL Metrics website.

Data from 2019 shows that library spending on collectibles averaged $5.6 million for institutions granting doctoral degrees; $724,124 for institutions granting full degrees; $486,972 for baccalaureate schools and $134,364 for institutions granting associate degrees. On average, institutions delivering doctorates spent 79.2% of their material budgets on ongoing subscription commitments in 2019; comprehensive schools spent an average of 82.6%; baccalaureate schools spent an average of 79.9%; and institutions granting associate degrees spent an average of 63.6%.

Data from 2019 shows that spending on wages and salaries averaged 61% of total library spending. Salaries and wages accounted for 80.3% of total library expenditures for associate degree institutions, 57.6% for bachelor’s degrees, 58.4% for comprehensive schools, and 47.9% for doctoral institutions /of research.

Spending per FTE student averaged $66 for associate degree institutions, $401 for bachelor’s degree schools, $255 for comprehensive universities, and $577 for doctoral/research institutions. The staff of institutions granting associate degrees averaged 4.6 FTE librarians, 5.4 FTE librarians in baccalaureate schools, 7.9 FTE librarians in comprehensive universities and 30.5 FTE librarians in doctoral institutions / of research.

Nearly half of the 1,516 libraries in the United States reported an OER initiative at their institution, with 12 estimating that OER saved students more than $1 million in the past fiscal year. Community colleges reported the highest percentage of OER initiatives at 62%, followed by doctoral institutions at 55%, colleges and master’s institutions at 42%, and colleges leading to a bachelor’s degree at 31%.

The 2019 survey includes data from 1,642 academic libraries in five broad categories:

  • Collections (including owned titles, volumes and e-books)
  • Expenses (library materials, salaries and wages, etc.)
  • Library services
  • Recruitment
  • OER initiatives

The survey also provides analysis of selected variables and summary data (high, low, medium and median) for all items. Data from 2019 can be used for self-study, budgeting, strategic planning, annual reports, grant applications and benchmarking.

“University Library Trends and Statistics 2019” is available for purchase through the ALA Online Store and by phone order at (866) 746-7252 in the United States or (770) 442-8633 for international customers.

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The Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) is the higher education association for college libraries and library workers. Representing nearly 10,000 people and libraries, ACRL (a division of the American Library Association) develops programs, products and services to help those who work in academic and research libraries learn, innovate and lead within the university community. Founded in 1940, ACRL is committed to advancing learning, transforming scholarship, and building diverse and inclusive communities. Find the ACRL on the the Web, Facebook, Twitter, instagram, and Youtube.

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